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Nina
July 1st 03, 05:00 AM
http://community.webshots.com/album/79162279OYIizs

I guess it would be on topic since
1. its a cheap way of occupying a lot of time
2. saves landscaping costs
3. uh.....cuz when the flowers bloom I can cut them, saving me from paying
the florist.
Nina


--
A bride in June, a slave in September.

Nina
July 1st 03, 04:08 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 01 Jul 2003 03:00:12 GMT, "Nina"
> > wrote:
>
> >http://community.webshots.com/album/79162279OYIizs
> >
> >I guess it would be on topic since
> >1. its a cheap way of occupying a lot of time
> >2. saves landscaping costs
> >3. uh.....cuz when the flowers bloom I can cut them, saving me from
paying
> >the florist.
>
> Really nice, Nina. You're making beauty where none existed
> - what could be more frugal?

Not much. :) I paid for mulch, seeds and some dirt, but most of the stuff
has been free, I just had to work like a dog to get it in place. I am going
to save even more seeds this year, so next summer I wont have as much money
to spend.

Besides, I enjoy seeing the
> pictures and I'll bet a lot of other folks do too (so you're
> providing us with frugal recreation, so there!) <g>

I mostly posted them with you in mind, I know you are over there working on
your gardening too.
>
> As the plants fill out, your areas are looking better and
> better of course.
>
Im excited about seeing some actual flowers. I kinda just tossed stuff in
there this year, I was desperate for something ,ANYTHING, in that yard.

> You're hooked, clearly - you're a gardener now. No point in
> resisting. :)
>

Yes, it seems I am. If I werent so tired (and mad at the short growing
season) I would have done a veggie garden,but its too much work to get
everything started in time,specially since we had 30 degree temps thru May.
I have the space to start things indoors, but the beasts (kids and pets)
would have had a field day with all that dirt in the house. In the meantime,
I have cilantro growing and it thrills me every time I have enough to pick.
I made salsa this weekend!!

> Old Chinese saying:
>
> Want to be happy for a day? Kill and roast a pig.
> Want to be happy for a week? Get married.
Haha. Just a week?
Nina

Nina
July 1st 03, 04:08 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 01 Jul 2003 03:00:12 GMT, "Nina"
> > wrote:
>
> >http://community.webshots.com/album/79162279OYIizs
> >
> >I guess it would be on topic since
> >1. its a cheap way of occupying a lot of time
> >2. saves landscaping costs
> >3. uh.....cuz when the flowers bloom I can cut them, saving me from
paying
> >the florist.
>
> Really nice, Nina. You're making beauty where none existed
> - what could be more frugal?

Not much. :) I paid for mulch, seeds and some dirt, but most of the stuff
has been free, I just had to work like a dog to get it in place. I am going
to save even more seeds this year, so next summer I wont have as much money
to spend.

Besides, I enjoy seeing the
> pictures and I'll bet a lot of other folks do too (so you're
> providing us with frugal recreation, so there!) <g>

I mostly posted them with you in mind, I know you are over there working on
your gardening too.
>
> As the plants fill out, your areas are looking better and
> better of course.
>
Im excited about seeing some actual flowers. I kinda just tossed stuff in
there this year, I was desperate for something ,ANYTHING, in that yard.

> You're hooked, clearly - you're a gardener now. No point in
> resisting. :)
>

Yes, it seems I am. If I werent so tired (and mad at the short growing
season) I would have done a veggie garden,but its too much work to get
everything started in time,specially since we had 30 degree temps thru May.
I have the space to start things indoors, but the beasts (kids and pets)
would have had a field day with all that dirt in the house. In the meantime,
I have cilantro growing and it thrills me every time I have enough to pick.
I made salsa this weekend!!

> Old Chinese saying:
>
> Want to be happy for a day? Kill and roast a pig.
> Want to be happy for a week? Get married.
Haha. Just a week?
Nina

Dennis
July 1st 03, 06:42 PM
On Tue, 01 Jul 2003 03:00:12 GMT, "Nina" >
wrote:

>http://community.webshots.com/album/79162279OYIizs
>
>I guess it would be on topic since
>1. its a cheap way of occupying a lot of time
>2. saves landscaping costs
>3. uh.....cuz when the flowers bloom I can cut them, saving me from paying
>the florist.

I cleared a patch of young alders that had sprouted in my woodlot a
while back, leaving me with a pile of 10-12 foot poles. My DW
suggested that use them to build an arbor for her beans to climb. I
sunk two rows of 4 poles vertically and lashed on some cross braces
with twine to form an arbor. The hope is that, with a person-sized
path down the middle, the beans will be easier tend than the
three-legged teepee-style supports we tried in the past. Photo posted
at:
http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/mcflfamilyalbum/lst

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
The honest man is the one who realizes that he cannot
consume more, in his lifetime, than he produces.

Dennis
July 1st 03, 06:42 PM
On Tue, 01 Jul 2003 03:00:12 GMT, "Nina" >
wrote:

>http://community.webshots.com/album/79162279OYIizs
>
>I guess it would be on topic since
>1. its a cheap way of occupying a lot of time
>2. saves landscaping costs
>3. uh.....cuz when the flowers bloom I can cut them, saving me from paying
>the florist.

I cleared a patch of young alders that had sprouted in my woodlot a
while back, leaving me with a pile of 10-12 foot poles. My DW
suggested that use them to build an arbor for her beans to climb. I
sunk two rows of 4 poles vertically and lashed on some cross braces
with twine to form an arbor. The hope is that, with a person-sized
path down the middle, the beans will be easier tend than the
three-legged teepee-style supports we tried in the past. Photo posted
at:
http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/mcflfamilyalbum/lst

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
The honest man is the one who realizes that he cannot
consume more, in his lifetime, than he produces.

July 1st 03, 08:50 PM
Dennis > wrote:

>I cleared a patch of young alders that had sprouted in my woodlot a
>while back, leaving me with a pile of 10-12 foot poles. My DW
>suggested that use them to build an arbor for her beans to climb. I
>sunk two rows of 4 poles vertically and lashed on some cross braces
>with twine to form an arbor.

Beans deserve better, but I'm sure they will thank you for doing the fava.
Alder best to you.

July 1st 03, 08:50 PM
Dennis > wrote:

>I cleared a patch of young alders that had sprouted in my woodlot a
>while back, leaving me with a pile of 10-12 foot poles. My DW
>suggested that use them to build an arbor for her beans to climb. I
>sunk two rows of 4 poles vertically and lashed on some cross braces
>with twine to form an arbor.

Beans deserve better, but I'm sure they will thank you for doing the fava.
Alder best to you.

Elaine Jackson
July 3rd 03, 02:37 AM
Pat Meadows wrote:
b>
>Our friends around-the-corner from us have a new ranch
>house: theirs was modular (built in a factory and arrives
>at the lot in 2 or 4 pieces). It's an exception to the
>'cheap cruddy new house syndrome' - it has a very liveable
>floor plan and nice large rooms.

Pat, I'd be interested in the manufacturer's name. Do you know, or could
you find out? The manufactured housing I've seen in this area loudly announces
"I'm cheap and expedient and every possible expense was spare in my
construction". TIA
Elaine J

Elaine Jackson
July 3rd 03, 02:37 AM
Pat Meadows wrote:
b>
>Our friends around-the-corner from us have a new ranch
>house: theirs was modular (built in a factory and arrives
>at the lot in 2 or 4 pieces). It's an exception to the
>'cheap cruddy new house syndrome' - it has a very liveable
>floor plan and nice large rooms.

Pat, I'd be interested in the manufacturer's name. Do you know, or could
you find out? The manufactured housing I've seen in this area loudly announces
"I'm cheap and expedient and every possible expense was spare in my
construction". TIA
Elaine J

jean and bill
July 3rd 03, 03:35 AM
In article >,
says...
> This is called a 'bi-level' house in places where I've
> lived. I lived in one for a while.
>
> I hate them too, I just detested the one we lived in. I
> don't like to live upstairs: I like to be on the ground.
>
> I think the reason so many bi-level homes were built is that
> they're a cheap way to get a relatively lot of square feet
> of space - no cellar.
>
>
Here on Long Island, they are called "high ranches", and there are lots
of them. They look like they are big houses, but apartments are what
they essentially are, and there is no storage space, unless you give up
a garage bay (most of these houses have two).

Jeannie
--
To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

jean and bill
July 3rd 03, 03:35 AM
In article >,
says...
> This is called a 'bi-level' house in places where I've
> lived. I lived in one for a while.
>
> I hate them too, I just detested the one we lived in. I
> don't like to live upstairs: I like to be on the ground.
>
> I think the reason so many bi-level homes were built is that
> they're a cheap way to get a relatively lot of square feet
> of space - no cellar.
>
>
Here on Long Island, they are called "high ranches", and there are lots
of them. They look like they are big houses, but apartments are what
they essentially are, and there is no storage space, unless you give up
a garage bay (most of these houses have two).

Jeannie
--
To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

Nina
July 3rd 03, 05:08 AM
"jean and bill" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> says...
> > This is called a 'bi-level' house in places where I've
> > lived. I lived in one for a while.
> >
> > I hate them too, I just detested the one we lived in. I
> > don't like to live upstairs: I like to be on the ground.
> >
> > I think the reason so many bi-level homes were built is that
> > they're a cheap way to get a relatively lot of square feet
> > of space - no cellar.
> >
> >
> Here on Long Island, they are called "high ranches", and there are lots
> of them. They look like they are big houses, but apartments are what
> they essentially are, and there is no storage space, unless you give up
> a garage bay (most of these houses have two).

Thats exactly it, this place is like 2 small apartments stacked on top of
one another.

Nina
July 3rd 03, 05:08 AM
"jean and bill" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> says...
> > This is called a 'bi-level' house in places where I've
> > lived. I lived in one for a while.
> >
> > I hate them too, I just detested the one we lived in. I
> > don't like to live upstairs: I like to be on the ground.
> >
> > I think the reason so many bi-level homes were built is that
> > they're a cheap way to get a relatively lot of square feet
> > of space - no cellar.
> >
> >
> Here on Long Island, they are called "high ranches", and there are lots
> of them. They look like they are big houses, but apartments are what
> they essentially are, and there is no storage space, unless you give up
> a garage bay (most of these houses have two).

Thats exactly it, this place is like 2 small apartments stacked on top of
one another.

Nina
July 3rd 03, 11:56 PM
"Tsu Dho Poster" >
>
> ps: R U near any of the dogtracks in Colo.?
>
>
Dog tracks? Thats whats in the back yard from Balto's pacing.
I dont know, I havent seen any billboards or anything, so I will assume we
arent.
Nina
dreaming of a wraparound porch and a magnolia tree

Nina
July 3rd 03, 11:56 PM
"Tsu Dho Poster" >
>
> ps: R U near any of the dogtracks in Colo.?
>
>
Dog tracks? Thats whats in the back yard from Balto's pacing.
I dont know, I havent seen any billboards or anything, so I will assume we
arent.
Nina
dreaming of a wraparound porch and a magnolia tree

Nina
July 4th 03, 05:20 AM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...
> Nina wrote:
>
> > dreaming of a wraparound porch and a magnolia tree
>
> Unless you hire pro gardeners, magnolias are the trees from hell. They
> drop huge leaves that are hard to get rid of, especially if you have ice
> plant under the tree, and in season they drop grenades for unwary bikers
> and runners to trip over. They also drop limbs in the slightest wind and
> their flowers are too high up to enjoy. If I didn't regard killing trees
> as a sin, the one in our parking strip would have ended its pitiful life
> in a friend's fireplace long ago.
>
> They have them as street trees all over here, and they look infinitely
> crappy because they don't get trimmed often or skillfully enough. The
> rich people's magnolias are very nice, though -- enviable, even -- but
> nowhere near as nice as jacarandas.
>

These are the kind we had in GA. Large flowers, low hung branches.

http://www.thejump.net/hunting/plant-id/southern-magnolia.htm

Most of them were about this size and the flowers were within reach of an
average adult.
http://www.noble.org/imagegallery/woodhtml/SouthernMagnolia.html

Nina
July 4th 03, 05:20 AM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...
> Nina wrote:
>
> > dreaming of a wraparound porch and a magnolia tree
>
> Unless you hire pro gardeners, magnolias are the trees from hell. They
> drop huge leaves that are hard to get rid of, especially if you have ice
> plant under the tree, and in season they drop grenades for unwary bikers
> and runners to trip over. They also drop limbs in the slightest wind and
> their flowers are too high up to enjoy. If I didn't regard killing trees
> as a sin, the one in our parking strip would have ended its pitiful life
> in a friend's fireplace long ago.
>
> They have them as street trees all over here, and they look infinitely
> crappy because they don't get trimmed often or skillfully enough. The
> rich people's magnolias are very nice, though -- enviable, even -- but
> nowhere near as nice as jacarandas.
>

These are the kind we had in GA. Large flowers, low hung branches.

http://www.thejump.net/hunting/plant-id/southern-magnolia.htm

Most of them were about this size and the flowers were within reach of an
average adult.
http://www.noble.org/imagegallery/woodhtml/SouthernMagnolia.html

The Real Bev
July 4th 03, 05:34 AM
Nina wrote:
>
> "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Nina wrote:
> >
> > > dreaming of a wraparound porch and a magnolia tree
> >
> > Unless you hire pro gardeners, magnolias are the trees from hell. They
> > drop huge leaves that are hard to get rid of, especially if you have ice
> > plant under the tree, and in season they drop grenades for unwary bikers
> > and runners to trip over. They also drop limbs in the slightest wind and
> > their flowers are too high up to enjoy. If I didn't regard killing trees
> > as a sin, the one in our parking strip would have ended its pitiful life
> > in a friend's fireplace long ago.
> >
> > They have them as street trees all over here, and they look infinitely
> > crappy because they don't get trimmed often or skillfully enough. The
> > rich people's magnolias are very nice, though -- enviable, even -- but
> > nowhere near as nice as jacarandas.
> >
>
> Well, I am willing to deal with the mess. My mother doesn't want one because
> they are messy, but I adore them. Having spent 16 years on and off in the
> south, mostly GA, I am quite familiar with the trees. The trees in most of
> the neighborhoods I have been to had the magnolias set far back enough that
> they didnt drop anything into the streets, just the yard.

It's roughly 2 feet from the curb and two feet from the sidewalk. If it
dropped its crap only in the street I wouldn't mind so much, but NOOOOO!
Perhaps in the south the leaves disintegrate sooner -- here they can
probably last forever unless you pick them up and throw them away.

> I never noticed
> anyone really having a problem with the upkeep. And as far as the flowers,
> all of the ones I have seen have had flowers as low as 5 feet. I used to
> pick them and float them in water. My last stint in GA, I lived next to a
> cemetery with dozens of trees, I would go a few times a week and collect
> flowers. I also harvested pine cones, BEAUTIFUL ones, for use in decorating.
> Perhaps its a regional thing? Where do you live?? Are there different
> varieties that have height differences??

Southern California. I think most of them are the same variety, at least
they all look alike. Height and shape depends on the care they're given.
The stupid thing in front of our house has been there longer than the 36
years we've owned the house, and it's perhaps 15 feet tall with leaves
beginning at 8 feet and a 7-inch diameter trunk. A few years ago it lost
half its crown in a windstorm and the whole tree lists at perhaps 40
degrees off plumb. I've never watered it or fed it -- if it wants to
survive it can damn well get along with what water I give the ice plant
beneath it.

> Nina
> who cleans up after kids, cats and dogs, so wouldnt mind a nice quiet
> magnolia's mess.

Kids and dogs, and even cats, give something back. All the stupid
magnolia does is drop annoyances. And don't get me started about Chinese
elms...

Now if you want a GOOD tree, plant a Moreton Bay fig. Beautiful trees,
and apparently well-suited to neglected areas. I recently noticed that
there are a number of them planted on local freeway embankments (the
freeway came through perhaps 30 years ago) and their trunks are perhaps 6
feet thick with all those LOVELY surface roots. They may have bad habits
that I don't know about, but they're so beautiful I would probably forgive
them.

--
Cheers,
Bev
---------------------------------------------------
Don't you just KNOW that there is more than one
Sierra Club member who is absolutely sure that the
dinosaurs died out because of something humans did?

The Real Bev
July 4th 03, 05:34 AM
Nina wrote:
>
> "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Nina wrote:
> >
> > > dreaming of a wraparound porch and a magnolia tree
> >
> > Unless you hire pro gardeners, magnolias are the trees from hell. They
> > drop huge leaves that are hard to get rid of, especially if you have ice
> > plant under the tree, and in season they drop grenades for unwary bikers
> > and runners to trip over. They also drop limbs in the slightest wind and
> > their flowers are too high up to enjoy. If I didn't regard killing trees
> > as a sin, the one in our parking strip would have ended its pitiful life
> > in a friend's fireplace long ago.
> >
> > They have them as street trees all over here, and they look infinitely
> > crappy because they don't get trimmed often or skillfully enough. The
> > rich people's magnolias are very nice, though -- enviable, even -- but
> > nowhere near as nice as jacarandas.
> >
>
> Well, I am willing to deal with the mess. My mother doesn't want one because
> they are messy, but I adore them. Having spent 16 years on and off in the
> south, mostly GA, I am quite familiar with the trees. The trees in most of
> the neighborhoods I have been to had the magnolias set far back enough that
> they didnt drop anything into the streets, just the yard.

It's roughly 2 feet from the curb and two feet from the sidewalk. If it
dropped its crap only in the street I wouldn't mind so much, but NOOOOO!
Perhaps in the south the leaves disintegrate sooner -- here they can
probably last forever unless you pick them up and throw them away.

> I never noticed
> anyone really having a problem with the upkeep. And as far as the flowers,
> all of the ones I have seen have had flowers as low as 5 feet. I used to
> pick them and float them in water. My last stint in GA, I lived next to a
> cemetery with dozens of trees, I would go a few times a week and collect
> flowers. I also harvested pine cones, BEAUTIFUL ones, for use in decorating.
> Perhaps its a regional thing? Where do you live?? Are there different
> varieties that have height differences??

Southern California. I think most of them are the same variety, at least
they all look alike. Height and shape depends on the care they're given.
The stupid thing in front of our house has been there longer than the 36
years we've owned the house, and it's perhaps 15 feet tall with leaves
beginning at 8 feet and a 7-inch diameter trunk. A few years ago it lost
half its crown in a windstorm and the whole tree lists at perhaps 40
degrees off plumb. I've never watered it or fed it -- if it wants to
survive it can damn well get along with what water I give the ice plant
beneath it.

> Nina
> who cleans up after kids, cats and dogs, so wouldnt mind a nice quiet
> magnolia's mess.

Kids and dogs, and even cats, give something back. All the stupid
magnolia does is drop annoyances. And don't get me started about Chinese
elms...

Now if you want a GOOD tree, plant a Moreton Bay fig. Beautiful trees,
and apparently well-suited to neglected areas. I recently noticed that
there are a number of them planted on local freeway embankments (the
freeway came through perhaps 30 years ago) and their trunks are perhaps 6
feet thick with all those LOVELY surface roots. They may have bad habits
that I don't know about, but they're so beautiful I would probably forgive
them.

--
Cheers,
Bev
---------------------------------------------------
Don't you just KNOW that there is more than one
Sierra Club member who is absolutely sure that the
dinosaurs died out because of something humans did?

The Real Bev
July 4th 03, 07:23 AM
Nina wrote:
>
> "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Nina wrote:
> >
> > > dreaming of a wraparound porch and a magnolia tree
> >
> > Unless you hire pro gardeners, magnolias are the trees from hell. They
> > drop huge leaves that are hard to get rid of, especially if you have ice
> > plant under the tree, and in season they drop grenades for unwary bikers
> > and runners to trip over. They also drop limbs in the slightest wind and
> > their flowers are too high up to enjoy. If I didn't regard killing trees
> > as a sin, the one in our parking strip would have ended its pitiful life
> > in a friend's fireplace long ago.
> >
> > They have them as street trees all over here, and they look infinitely
> > crappy because they don't get trimmed often or skillfully enough. The
> > rich people's magnolias are very nice, though -- enviable, even -- but
> > nowhere near as nice as jacarandas.
>
> These are the kind we had in GA. Large flowers, low hung branches.
>
> http://www.thejump.net/hunting/plant-id/southern-magnolia.htm
>
> Most of them were about this size and the flowers were within reach of an
> average adult.
> http://www.noble.org/imagegallery/woodhtml/SouthernMagnolia.html

Yup, those are the nasty things! The nice ones have been pruned to a
single main trunk with sparsely placed horizontal branches, much like a
pine tree, with lots of air space between. Left to their own devices they
form a blob-shaped crown, which is frequently hacked back to clear phone
and power lines, and chunks break off in windstorms. BIG chunks.
Car-killing chunks.

Interesting factoid: The trees belong to the City, so you're not supposed
to trim them. The City trims them when it has to. Recently a branch fell
off one of them, smashing the brand new car parked beneath. It turns out
that the City claims it's not liable because nobody notified The
Authorities that the tree was dangerous. I would have sued, but in the
last article I read about it the owners seemed resigned to their fate.

This provides a frugal source of fun: Report (phone and/or email, why
waste a stamp?) any possible dangerous condition you see to The Proper
Authorities, making sure you know that they are now legally liable for any
damage done by the <offending item>. I reported a heaved block of
sidewalk, asking that they fix it before some lawyer's mother trips her
wheelchair on it, requiring that they spend MY money to settle the
lawsuit. Within a week they'd smoothed the area out with blacktop -- ugly
and not truly functional, but better than it was. HAH-ha!

--
Cheers,
Bev
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I don't need instructions, I have a hammer."
-- T.W. Wier

The Real Bev
July 4th 03, 07:23 AM
Nina wrote:
>
> "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Nina wrote:
> >
> > > dreaming of a wraparound porch and a magnolia tree
> >
> > Unless you hire pro gardeners, magnolias are the trees from hell. They
> > drop huge leaves that are hard to get rid of, especially if you have ice
> > plant under the tree, and in season they drop grenades for unwary bikers
> > and runners to trip over. They also drop limbs in the slightest wind and
> > their flowers are too high up to enjoy. If I didn't regard killing trees
> > as a sin, the one in our parking strip would have ended its pitiful life
> > in a friend's fireplace long ago.
> >
> > They have them as street trees all over here, and they look infinitely
> > crappy because they don't get trimmed often or skillfully enough. The
> > rich people's magnolias are very nice, though -- enviable, even -- but
> > nowhere near as nice as jacarandas.
>
> These are the kind we had in GA. Large flowers, low hung branches.
>
> http://www.thejump.net/hunting/plant-id/southern-magnolia.htm
>
> Most of them were about this size and the flowers were within reach of an
> average adult.
> http://www.noble.org/imagegallery/woodhtml/SouthernMagnolia.html

Yup, those are the nasty things! The nice ones have been pruned to a
single main trunk with sparsely placed horizontal branches, much like a
pine tree, with lots of air space between. Left to their own devices they
form a blob-shaped crown, which is frequently hacked back to clear phone
and power lines, and chunks break off in windstorms. BIG chunks.
Car-killing chunks.

Interesting factoid: The trees belong to the City, so you're not supposed
to trim them. The City trims them when it has to. Recently a branch fell
off one of them, smashing the brand new car parked beneath. It turns out
that the City claims it's not liable because nobody notified The
Authorities that the tree was dangerous. I would have sued, but in the
last article I read about it the owners seemed resigned to their fate.

This provides a frugal source of fun: Report (phone and/or email, why
waste a stamp?) any possible dangerous condition you see to The Proper
Authorities, making sure you know that they are now legally liable for any
damage done by the <offending item>. I reported a heaved block of
sidewalk, asking that they fix it before some lawyer's mother trips her
wheelchair on it, requiring that they spend MY money to settle the
lawsuit. Within a week they'd smoothed the area out with blacktop -- ugly
and not truly functional, but better than it was. HAH-ha!

--
Cheers,
Bev
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"I don't need instructions, I have a hammer."
-- T.W. Wier

Nina
July 4th 03, 08:30 AM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...
> Nina wrote:
> >
> > "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > Nina wrote:
> > >
> > > > dreaming of a wraparound porch and a magnolia tree
> > >
> > > Unless you hire pro gardeners, magnolias are the trees from hell.
They
> > > drop huge leaves that are hard to get rid of, especially if you have
ice
> > > plant under the tree, and in season they drop grenades for unwary
bikers
> > > and runners to trip over. They also drop limbs in the slightest wind
and
> > > their flowers are too high up to enjoy. If I didn't regard killing
trees
> > > as a sin, the one in our parking strip would have ended its pitiful
life
> > > in a friend's fireplace long ago.
> > >
> > > They have them as street trees all over here, and they look infinitely
> > > crappy because they don't get trimmed often or skillfully enough. The
> > > rich people's magnolias are very nice, though -- enviable, even -- but
> > > nowhere near as nice as jacarandas.
> >
> > These are the kind we had in GA. Large flowers, low hung branches.
> >
> > http://www.thejump.net/hunting/plant-id/southern-magnolia.htm
> >
> > Most of them were about this size and the flowers were within reach of
an
> > average adult.
> > http://www.noble.org/imagegallery/woodhtml/SouthernMagnolia.html
>
> Yup, those are the nasty things! The nice ones have been pruned to a
> single main trunk with sparsely placed horizontal branches, much like a
> pine tree, with lots of air space between. Left to their own devices they
> form a blob-shaped crown, which is frequently hacked back to clear phone
> and power lines, and chunks break off in windstorms. BIG chunks.
> Car-killing chunks.

Hmm, normally in GA they weren't very close to the road, I suppose that
makes a difference. I can't remember seeing any anywhere but squarely in the
middle of a lawn, no need to hack for power lines etc.

>

Nina
July 4th 03, 08:30 AM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...
> Nina wrote:
> >
> > "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > Nina wrote:
> > >
> > > > dreaming of a wraparound porch and a magnolia tree
> > >
> > > Unless you hire pro gardeners, magnolias are the trees from hell.
They
> > > drop huge leaves that are hard to get rid of, especially if you have
ice
> > > plant under the tree, and in season they drop grenades for unwary
bikers
> > > and runners to trip over. They also drop limbs in the slightest wind
and
> > > their flowers are too high up to enjoy. If I didn't regard killing
trees
> > > as a sin, the one in our parking strip would have ended its pitiful
life
> > > in a friend's fireplace long ago.
> > >
> > > They have them as street trees all over here, and they look infinitely
> > > crappy because they don't get trimmed often or skillfully enough. The
> > > rich people's magnolias are very nice, though -- enviable, even -- but
> > > nowhere near as nice as jacarandas.
> >
> > These are the kind we had in GA. Large flowers, low hung branches.
> >
> > http://www.thejump.net/hunting/plant-id/southern-magnolia.htm
> >
> > Most of them were about this size and the flowers were within reach of
an
> > average adult.
> > http://www.noble.org/imagegallery/woodhtml/SouthernMagnolia.html
>
> Yup, those are the nasty things! The nice ones have been pruned to a
> single main trunk with sparsely placed horizontal branches, much like a
> pine tree, with lots of air space between. Left to their own devices they
> form a blob-shaped crown, which is frequently hacked back to clear phone
> and power lines, and chunks break off in windstorms. BIG chunks.
> Car-killing chunks.

Hmm, normally in GA they weren't very close to the road, I suppose that
makes a difference. I can't remember seeing any anywhere but squarely in the
middle of a lawn, no need to hack for power lines etc.

>

juliehh
July 4th 03, 09:12 PM
Nina > wrote in message
...
> These are the kind we had in GA. Large flowers, low hung branches.
>
> http://www.thejump.net/hunting/plant-id/southern-magnolia.htm

the leaves are beautiful when they turn brown - i took one and matched it to
paint a bedroom.
julie

juliehh
July 4th 03, 09:12 PM
Nina > wrote in message
...
> These are the kind we had in GA. Large flowers, low hung branches.
>
> http://www.thejump.net/hunting/plant-id/southern-magnolia.htm

the leaves are beautiful when they turn brown - i took one and matched it to
paint a bedroom.
julie

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