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View Full Version : That new "Poly Pill".....D I Y?


Tsu Dho Poster
July 1st 03, 02:26 PM
Poly Pill as Poly-Baloney

When I turned on the TV Sunday, I was greeted with the news of this
exciting new discovery:
A Poly Pill which could slash the death rates from ht attacks & strokes by
80%! (WOW)

When I saw the (proposed) list of ingredients, I asked myself: "What's new
here?" Combining beta blockers with diuretics is rarely done anymore,
probably for good reason(s)? Also, the 6-year, 40,000 patient ALLHAT study
of B-pressure drugs showed that none were better the others. I thought
maybe, (but not seriously) this might just be a gimmick to offload some
slow-selling merchandise.

Lo and behold....this article states:
<snipped>
The pill could also be produced cheaply, says Wald, as the patents on many
of the components have expired or will do soon.
<snip>
LOL That's it.... recycling old drugs!

Seems to me, if saving lives were their main concern, they'd advise ppl to
start taking this combo now, and not wait for the completion of clinical
trials. After all, they intend for patients to just pop the combo without
even a medical exam!
The advantage of taking these singularly is, you could more easily discern
which pill is causing the most unpleasant side effects. Taking that Poly
pill, how would you know which ingredient is the culprit??

One article,(not even worthy of Usenet, imo)

'Polypill' could slash heart attacks and strokes
http://tinyurl.com/fnqd

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<some snippettes on statin drugs>

UK HEART FAILURE WARNING

Thousands of people in Britain may be at risk of death from heart failure
brought on by 'life-saving' drugs, a new study warned.
The results of the research suggest statin drugs could cause an "epidemic"
of heart failure.

Statin drugs are taken by one million people each day in the UK to reduce
the risk of heart disease and strokes.
Hailed as a "wonder drug", they block the body's production of cholesterol
leading to heart attacks and strokes.

But a new study in the US reveals the drugs also deplete the body's ability
to produce coenzyme Q10, (CoQ10).
Reduced levels of this vital nutrient results in heart failure and death,
the research suggests.

US cardiologist Dr Peter Langsjoen, the author of the study, will present
his findings at a medical conference in central London.
He said: "I think people taking statins should be very worried. I don't
think this can be ignored."

Statins, costing £1 per pill, are currently restricted to people who have
heart disease and raised cholesterol.
They were first used in the UK in 1996

http://www.sky.com/skynews/article/0,,30100-12175258,00.html

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-----------------------

STATIN-INDUCED CARDIOMYOPATHY

By Peter H. Langsjoen, MD

The medical profession has, after more than 30 years of excellent
propaganda, successfully created the wholly iatrogenic - "pseudo-disease"
dubbed "hypercholesterolemia" and the associated malady "cholesterol
neurosis". After decades of dismal failure to cure this "disease" of numbers
with low fat diets and a host of cholesterol lowering drugs, the medical
profession stumbled upon the magic bullet, the cure for this dreaded
artificial disease - statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors). First released
on the US market in 1987, statins have rapidly grown into one of the most
widely prescribed class of drugs in history. Statins do three things:

1. They block the body's ability to make cholesterol, thus lowering the
blood level of cholesterol, thereby curing cholesterol neurosis. Doctors and
patients equally neurotic have immediate gratification. The "evil" high
cholesterol has been dramatically lowered and the future is bright and
promising. So far...so good.

2. Unrelated to their cholesterol lowering, statins have been found to have
anti-inflammatory, plaque-stabilizing properties which have a slight benefit
in coronary heart disease.

3. Statins kill people - lots of people - and they wound many, many more.
All patients taking statins become depleted in Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10),
eventually - those patients who start with a relatively low CoQ10 levels
(the elderly and patients with heart failure) begin to manifest
signs/symptoms of CoQ10 deficiency relatively rapidly - in 6 to 12 months.
Younger, healthier people who's only "illness" is the non-illness
"hypercholesterolemia" can tolerate statins for several years before getting
into trouble with fatigue, muscle weakness and soreness (usually with normal
muscle enzyme CPK tests) and most ominously - heart failure.

In my practice of 17 years in Tyler, Texas, I have seen a frightening
increase in heart failure secondary to statin usage, "statin
cardiomyopathy". Over the past five years, statins have become more potent,
are being prescribed in higher doses, and are being used with reckless
abandon in the elderly and in patients with "normal" cholesterol levels. We
are in the midst of a CHF epidemic in the US with a dramatic increase over
the past decade. Are we causing this epidemic through our zealous use of
statins? In large part I think the answer is yes. We are now in a position
to witness the unfolding of the greatest medical tragedy of all time - never
before in history has the medical establishment knowingly (Merck & Co., Inc.
has two 1990 patents combining CoQ10 with statins to prevent CoQ10 depletion
and attendant side effects) created a life threatening nutrient deficiency
in millions of otherwise healthy people, only to then sit back with
arrogance and horrific irresponsibility and watch to see what happens - as I
see two to three new statin cardiomyopathies per week in my practice, I
cannot help but view my once great profession with a mixture of sorrow and
contempt.

Statin-induced CoQ10 depletion is the topic of a recent petition to the FDA
requesting that this drug/nutrient interaction be identified in a black box
warning as part of statin package insert information. A comprehensive review
of animal and human trials addressing this issue has been submitted to the
FDA as a supporting document. We, of course, do not expect any response from
the FDA, but 10 years from now when the full extent of statin toxicity
becomes painfully evident, at least we can, in good conscience, know that we
tried and who knows, sometimes small sparks may spread in dry grass.

http://www.redflagsweekly.com/features/2002_july08P.html

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Cholesterol Drugs And The Depletion Of Coenzyme Q10: A Review Of Human And
Animal Data.
By Peter H. Langsjoen, MD
http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/dailys/02/May02/052902/02p-0244-cp00001-02-
Exhibit_A-vol1.pdf

<snipped>
The peer-reviewed scientific evidence supports the following findings:

1. Statins block the endogenous biosynthesis of both cholesterol and CoQlo
by inhibiting the
enzyme HMG CoA reductase, thus decreasing mevalonate, the precursor of both
cholesterol and
CoQio.

2. CoQlo is essential for mitochondrial ATP production and is a potent lipid
soluble antioxidant
present in cell membranes and carried in the blood by LDL. CoQl 0 is
biosynthesized in the
body and available fiom dietary sources.

3. Statin-induced decreases in CoQlo are more than just hypothetical
drug-nutrient interactions.
Good evidence exists of significant CoQlo depletion in humans and animals
during statin
therapy.

4. Scientific evidence confirms the existence of detrimental cardiac
consequences from statin-
induced CoQlO deficiencies in man and animals.

Lee K
July 1st 03, 04:10 PM
Hey, Tsu Dho, are you in any way related to Bo Thai?

Lee K
July 1st 03, 04:10 PM
Hey, Tsu Dho, are you in any way related to Bo Thai?

The Real Bev
July 2nd 03, 06:55 AM
Derald Martin wrote:
>
> Hey; do think that maybe if I read that all over again I'd have a
> clue what in hell you (and they) 're talking about? Not likely, huh? Oh,
> well... ****, this stuff must be better than I thought; and I missed it.
> What was that about, anyway?, I ax. What's a "poly pill"; is it anything
> like "poly fill" or "poly pellets"? Hum-m-m-m?

Google is your friend.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/sophie_scott/newsitems/s890094.htm just
happened to be the first thing I found:

================================================== ========================

Friday, June 27, 2003 . Posted: 00:00:00 (AEDT)
Experimental pill offers dramatic benefits

It is nicknamed the 'poly pill' and British researchers say it is one of
the most important medical advances in 50 years.

They have combined six common medicines in a single tablet which they
believe can prevent 80 per cent of heart attacks and strokes, and they say
anyone over 55 should be taking it.

"The expected benefits are really very large with an estimated 88 per cent
reduction in risk of heart attacks," chief researcher Prof Nick Wald from
the University of London said.

Scientists examined the results of 750 trials, involving more than 500,000
patients.

They combined six commonly used drugs: a cholesterol lowering pill, three
blood pressure medications taken at half the standard dose, folic acid and
a small dose of aspirin.

Their study, published in today's issue of the British Medical Journal,
says that the "poly pill would be safe, and with widespread use could have
a greater impact on the prevention of disease than any other single
treatment."

But what about the cost of the poly pill?

Folic acid and aspirin can be manufactured quite cheaply, while the
patents covering the other ingredients in the drug mixture are about to
expire, meaning any pharmaceutical company could make them.

Australian experts say any combination pill is still a few years off.

"It is theoretical, we still need to show you can put these drugs together
in a tablet and not lose their efficacy," Professor Andrew Tonkin, from
the Heart Foundation said.

Doctors warn the pill would not be suitable for patients with asthma or
those sensitive to aspirin.

(c) 2003 Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Copyright information: http://abc.net.au/common/copyrigh.htm
Privacy information: http://abc.net.au/privacy.htm
================================================== ========================

The Real Bev
July 2nd 03, 06:55 AM
Derald Martin wrote:
>
> Hey; do think that maybe if I read that all over again I'd have a
> clue what in hell you (and they) 're talking about? Not likely, huh? Oh,
> well... ****, this stuff must be better than I thought; and I missed it.
> What was that about, anyway?, I ax. What's a "poly pill"; is it anything
> like "poly fill" or "poly pellets"? Hum-m-m-m?

Google is your friend.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/health/sophie_scott/newsitems/s890094.htm just
happened to be the first thing I found:

================================================== ========================

Friday, June 27, 2003 . Posted: 00:00:00 (AEDT)
Experimental pill offers dramatic benefits

It is nicknamed the 'poly pill' and British researchers say it is one of
the most important medical advances in 50 years.

They have combined six common medicines in a single tablet which they
believe can prevent 80 per cent of heart attacks and strokes, and they say
anyone over 55 should be taking it.

"The expected benefits are really very large with an estimated 88 per cent
reduction in risk of heart attacks," chief researcher Prof Nick Wald from
the University of London said.

Scientists examined the results of 750 trials, involving more than 500,000
patients.

They combined six commonly used drugs: a cholesterol lowering pill, three
blood pressure medications taken at half the standard dose, folic acid and
a small dose of aspirin.

Their study, published in today's issue of the British Medical Journal,
says that the "poly pill would be safe, and with widespread use could have
a greater impact on the prevention of disease than any other single
treatment."

But what about the cost of the poly pill?

Folic acid and aspirin can be manufactured quite cheaply, while the
patents covering the other ingredients in the drug mixture are about to
expire, meaning any pharmaceutical company could make them.

Australian experts say any combination pill is still a few years off.

"It is theoretical, we still need to show you can put these drugs together
in a tablet and not lose their efficacy," Professor Andrew Tonkin, from
the Heart Foundation said.

Doctors warn the pill would not be suitable for patients with asthma or
those sensitive to aspirin.

(c) 2003 Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Copyright information: http://abc.net.au/common/copyrigh.htm
Privacy information: http://abc.net.au/privacy.htm
================================================== ========================

Tsu Dho Poster
July 2nd 03, 10:55 PM
"Lee K" > wrote in message
...
> Hey, Tsu Dho, are you in any way related to Bo Thai?
>
lol! No...but during a brief pitstop at a tiny seaport South of Bangkok, I
encountered numerous "Thai Ho's"

Tsu Dho Poster
July 2nd 03, 10:55 PM
"Lee K" > wrote in message
...
> Hey, Tsu Dho, are you in any way related to Bo Thai?
>
lol! No...but during a brief pitstop at a tiny seaport South of Bangkok, I
encountered numerous "Thai Ho's"

Google