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View Full Version : Re: Hourly rate for computer repair?


Bob
July 2nd 03, 02:50 AM
"George" > wrote in message news:Lg0La.19264
> I think it is because unless you understand how they work most people
think
> repairing them consists of clicking somewhere. And since anyone can click
> it has no or little value.

It's not that you click, it's knowing where to click?

Bob

Colt
July 2nd 03, 01:46 PM
Old_Timer wrote:
>
> On Sun, 29 Jun 2003 08:54:07 -0400, Pat Meadows >
> wrote:
>
> >On Sun, 29 Jun 2003 08:35:36 -0400, Me >
> >wrote:
> >
> >
> >>This depends on several factors. What kind of computer? Is it business
> >>or commercial? What time of day? Weekends and nights are more expensive
> >>than standard business hours. I have paid $200 an hour for repairs on a
> >>Sun Enterprise server, plus travel time, plus parts. Every once in a
> >>while, I do work for a private office and I bill them $50 an hour to
> >>work on their Mac. Frankly, paying more than $100 to repair a PC for
> >>personal use is probably a bad investment. Just do regular backups and
> >>replace the computer if it fails.
> >
> >I'd add to that: And learn how to use your next computer -
> >using a firewall program, an anti-virus programs, getting
> >the critical Windows updates, doing the occasional scandisk
> >and defrag, making regular backups, etc.
> >
> >Some people will go out and buy a new PC and promptly make
> >the same mistakes on the new one....so they're no better off
> >than with the old computer, and even if they're only $500
> >poorer, it's a shame to waste the $500. For some people,
> >that's a substantial sum of money: it would be for us.
> >
> >Pat
>
> In a conversation with a friend who owns a computer shop we discussed
> the charge for PC repair. I mentioned to him that sometimes I run
> into difficult to resolve problems that take me far longer to resolve
> that I thought it would. I asked him if this happened to him in his
> store and wouldn't that make the repair bill more than the worth of
> the computer. (I think his posted repair charge is $50 per hour)
>
> He replied that indeed this does happen to him at times. He said that
> on the invoice he will list and charge for less time than it actually
> took all in the interests of maintaining good will and a good rep.
> Much of his business comes as a result of "word of mouth".
> He says that it would be counter productive for him to try to charge a
> customer $400 to repair a computer that is only worth $200.
> I have little doubt that he will try to convince the customer to
> either upgrade or buy a new computer from him.
> He also mentioned that sometimes he will simply inform the customer
> that his computer is beyond economical repair.
>
> Old_Timer


This happens once or twice a week in my husband's business, too. He
will just charge 100 bucks or so even if he has spent several hours
working on the computer (sometimes he brings the computers home and
spends all weekend, on and off, working on them).

On the other hand, if it's a newer computer that's just been totally
screwed up by viruses, he will generally charge his full hourly price to
fix it and will make sure the computer has a good anti-virus program and
that the owner has written instructions re: how to update the program
regularly (and why it's important to do so). He routinely adds
anti-virus, anti-spyware, anti-popup, and firewall software to the
computers of customers who need them.

Sometimes he has to charge $200 to fix a $400 computer, but you have to
realize that MOST people call him because they are having software
problems, not hardware problems. These problems will not be fixed by
running out and buying a new computer--generally people need to save the
data on their old computer and find a way to access it.

He always tells people when he thinks their computer is not worth
fixing. You would be surprised at the number of people who want their
computers fixed anyway--they're willing to pay $100-$200 for repair but
not $400-$500 for a new computer.

One of his clients had brought a printer to a repair shop and had been
given an estimate of $250 for repair. He called my husband, who took a
look at the printer and told him he could buy a new one just like it for
about $150--the other repair shop had not told him this! My husband gets
lots of word-of-mouth referrals because he's knowledgeable, competent,
honest, and inexpensive--these qualities apparently can be difficult to
find in combination :-).

Colt
July 2nd 03, 01:46 PM
Old_Timer wrote:
>
> On Sun, 29 Jun 2003 08:54:07 -0400, Pat Meadows >
> wrote:
>
> >On Sun, 29 Jun 2003 08:35:36 -0400, Me >
> >wrote:
> >
> >
> >>This depends on several factors. What kind of computer? Is it business
> >>or commercial? What time of day? Weekends and nights are more expensive
> >>than standard business hours. I have paid $200 an hour for repairs on a
> >>Sun Enterprise server, plus travel time, plus parts. Every once in a
> >>while, I do work for a private office and I bill them $50 an hour to
> >>work on their Mac. Frankly, paying more than $100 to repair a PC for
> >>personal use is probably a bad investment. Just do regular backups and
> >>replace the computer if it fails.
> >
> >I'd add to that: And learn how to use your next computer -
> >using a firewall program, an anti-virus programs, getting
> >the critical Windows updates, doing the occasional scandisk
> >and defrag, making regular backups, etc.
> >
> >Some people will go out and buy a new PC and promptly make
> >the same mistakes on the new one....so they're no better off
> >than with the old computer, and even if they're only $500
> >poorer, it's a shame to waste the $500. For some people,
> >that's a substantial sum of money: it would be for us.
> >
> >Pat
>
> In a conversation with a friend who owns a computer shop we discussed
> the charge for PC repair. I mentioned to him that sometimes I run
> into difficult to resolve problems that take me far longer to resolve
> that I thought it would. I asked him if this happened to him in his
> store and wouldn't that make the repair bill more than the worth of
> the computer. (I think his posted repair charge is $50 per hour)
>
> He replied that indeed this does happen to him at times. He said that
> on the invoice he will list and charge for less time than it actually
> took all in the interests of maintaining good will and a good rep.
> Much of his business comes as a result of "word of mouth".
> He says that it would be counter productive for him to try to charge a
> customer $400 to repair a computer that is only worth $200.
> I have little doubt that he will try to convince the customer to
> either upgrade or buy a new computer from him.
> He also mentioned that sometimes he will simply inform the customer
> that his computer is beyond economical repair.
>
> Old_Timer


This happens once or twice a week in my husband's business, too. He
will just charge 100 bucks or so even if he has spent several hours
working on the computer (sometimes he brings the computers home and
spends all weekend, on and off, working on them).

On the other hand, if it's a newer computer that's just been totally
screwed up by viruses, he will generally charge his full hourly price to
fix it and will make sure the computer has a good anti-virus program and
that the owner has written instructions re: how to update the program
regularly (and why it's important to do so). He routinely adds
anti-virus, anti-spyware, anti-popup, and firewall software to the
computers of customers who need them.

Sometimes he has to charge $200 to fix a $400 computer, but you have to
realize that MOST people call him because they are having software
problems, not hardware problems. These problems will not be fixed by
running out and buying a new computer--generally people need to save the
data on their old computer and find a way to access it.

He always tells people when he thinks their computer is not worth
fixing. You would be surprised at the number of people who want their
computers fixed anyway--they're willing to pay $100-$200 for repair but
not $400-$500 for a new computer.

One of his clients had brought a printer to a repair shop and had been
given an estimate of $250 for repair. He called my husband, who took a
look at the printer and told him he could buy a new one just like it for
about $150--the other repair shop had not told him this! My husband gets
lots of word-of-mouth referrals because he's knowledgeable, competent,
honest, and inexpensive--these qualities apparently can be difficult to
find in combination :-).

Halcitron
July 3rd 03, 11:07 PM
>From: Colt

>Newsgroups: misc.consumers.frugal-living

>Date: Wed, 02 Jul 2003 07:46:39 -0400

>
>
>This happens once or twice a week in my husband's business, too. He
>will just charge 100 bucks or so even if he has spent several hours
>working on the computer (sometimes he brings the computers home and
>spends all weekend, on and off, working on them).
>
>On the other hand, if it's a newer computer that's just been totally
>screwed up by viruses, he will generally charge his full hourly price to
>fix it and will make sure the computer has a good anti-virus program and
>that the owner has written instructions re: how to update the program
>regularly (and why it's important to do so). He routinely adds
>anti-virus, anti-spyware, anti-popup, and firewall software to the
>computers of customers who need them.
>
>Sometimes he has to charge $200 to fix a $400 computer, but you have to
>realize that MOST people call him because they are having software
>problems, not hardware problems. These problems will not be fixed by
>running out and buying a new computer--generally people need to save the
>data on their old computer and find a way to access it.
>
>He always tells people when he thinks their computer is not worth
>fixing. You would be surprised at the number of people who want their
>computers fixed anyway--they're willing to pay $100-$200 for repair but
>not $400-$500 for a new computer.
>
>One of his clients had brought a printer to a repair shop and had been
>given an estimate of $250 for repair. He called my husband, who took a
>look at the printer and told him he could buy a new one just like it for
>about $150--the other repair shop had not told him this! My husband gets
>lots of word-of-mouth referrals because he's knowledgeable, competent,
>honest, and inexpensive--these qualities apparently can be difficult to
>find in combination :-).

I have been using Norton System Works for an annual cost of $100, it includes a
one year subscription to Free Online Updates and it automatically updates when
you go online.

I recently removed NSW2002 and installed NSW2003. NSW2003 is more automatic.
The One- Button Checkup (OBC) can be scheduled to run at anytime, but will run
in the background, without a problem. The OBC will automatically repair the
errors it finds. The Optimization meter in the windows System Doctor, will
automatically optimize/defrag at the alarm level you set.

When it comes to a new computer, I would like to be with the customer from
purchase through setup and monthly for check ups.


caveat lector

Halcitron misc.survivalism
Check your six and know when to duck.
NRA Member since 2002
The Law of the Land, is the weapon in your hand.

Smith & Wesson starts where the Bill of Rights stop.

Halcitron
July 3rd 03, 11:07 PM
>From: Colt

>Newsgroups: misc.consumers.frugal-living

>Date: Wed, 02 Jul 2003 07:46:39 -0400

>
>
>This happens once or twice a week in my husband's business, too. He
>will just charge 100 bucks or so even if he has spent several hours
>working on the computer (sometimes he brings the computers home and
>spends all weekend, on and off, working on them).
>
>On the other hand, if it's a newer computer that's just been totally
>screwed up by viruses, he will generally charge his full hourly price to
>fix it and will make sure the computer has a good anti-virus program and
>that the owner has written instructions re: how to update the program
>regularly (and why it's important to do so). He routinely adds
>anti-virus, anti-spyware, anti-popup, and firewall software to the
>computers of customers who need them.
>
>Sometimes he has to charge $200 to fix a $400 computer, but you have to
>realize that MOST people call him because they are having software
>problems, not hardware problems. These problems will not be fixed by
>running out and buying a new computer--generally people need to save the
>data on their old computer and find a way to access it.
>
>He always tells people when he thinks their computer is not worth
>fixing. You would be surprised at the number of people who want their
>computers fixed anyway--they're willing to pay $100-$200 for repair but
>not $400-$500 for a new computer.
>
>One of his clients had brought a printer to a repair shop and had been
>given an estimate of $250 for repair. He called my husband, who took a
>look at the printer and told him he could buy a new one just like it for
>about $150--the other repair shop had not told him this! My husband gets
>lots of word-of-mouth referrals because he's knowledgeable, competent,
>honest, and inexpensive--these qualities apparently can be difficult to
>find in combination :-).

I have been using Norton System Works for an annual cost of $100, it includes a
one year subscription to Free Online Updates and it automatically updates when
you go online.

I recently removed NSW2002 and installed NSW2003. NSW2003 is more automatic.
The One- Button Checkup (OBC) can be scheduled to run at anytime, but will run
in the background, without a problem. The OBC will automatically repair the
errors it finds. The Optimization meter in the windows System Doctor, will
automatically optimize/defrag at the alarm level you set.

When it comes to a new computer, I would like to be with the customer from
purchase through setup and monthly for check ups.


caveat lector

Halcitron misc.survivalism
Check your six and know when to duck.
NRA Member since 2002
The Law of the Land, is the weapon in your hand.

Smith & Wesson starts where the Bill of Rights stop.

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