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poohbear
July 2nd 03, 06:11 PM
My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
outside air to circulate into the garage.

I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
the (air-conditioned) house.

My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
insulated. He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.

What do think?

PoohBear

Anthony Matonak
July 2nd 03, 06:44 PM
poohbear wrote:
> My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
> doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
> garage).
....

Get a couple of thermometers. Perhaps ones that records the highest
and lowest temperatures. Place one in the garage. Place out outside
the garage (in the shade). One hot summer day, leave the garage doors
open. Compare the outside and inside temperatures. Another hot summer
day, leave the garage doors closed. Compare the temperatures again.
See which one leaves the garage cooler.

Anthony

Anthony Matonak
July 2nd 03, 06:44 PM
poohbear wrote:
> My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
> doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
> garage).
....

Get a couple of thermometers. Perhaps ones that records the highest
and lowest temperatures. Place one in the garage. Place out outside
the garage (in the shade). One hot summer day, leave the garage doors
open. Compare the outside and inside temperatures. Another hot summer
day, leave the garage doors closed. Compare the temperatures again.
See which one leaves the garage cooler.

Anthony

July 2nd 03, 07:35 PM
poohbear > wrote:

>He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.

That can certainly be true here. Fortunately for us, there is only one
connecting wall.

The difference in heat leakage into the living space is probably not a
tremendous amount unless the garage feels like an oven in the afternoon.

July 2nd 03, 07:35 PM
poohbear > wrote:

>He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.

That can certainly be true here. Fortunately for us, there is only one
connecting wall.

The difference in heat leakage into the living space is probably not a
tremendous amount unless the garage feels like an oven in the afternoon.

Nick Pine
July 2nd 03, 07:57 PM
poohbear > wrote:

>My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
>doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
>garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
>outside air to circulate into the garage.

You might close the bedroom doors and AC vents during the day...

>I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
>hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
>the (air-conditioned) house.

Sounds reasonable.

>My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
>partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
>insulated. He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.
>
>What do think?

Why not fill the garage with flat poly film water ducts on welded-wire
shelves and lock the garage door partly open with a one-way plastic film
damper over the bottom gap and make a trap door over a ceiling fan to cool
the bedroom during the day, and add a whole house fan to a bedroom window
to cool everything at night. You might add a single layer of polycarbonate
air heater glazing over the sunny walls for wintertime solar house heating.

Now, would Monsieur Klipstein have an opinion as to the change in output
and lifetime after adding a) a 100 resistor or b) a diode in series with
a 120 V Philips 7 W clear incandescent night light bulb?

Nick

Nick Pine
July 2nd 03, 07:57 PM
poohbear > wrote:

>My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
>doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
>garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
>outside air to circulate into the garage.

You might close the bedroom doors and AC vents during the day...

>I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
>hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
>the (air-conditioned) house.

Sounds reasonable.

>My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
>partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
>insulated. He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.
>
>What do think?

Why not fill the garage with flat poly film water ducts on welded-wire
shelves and lock the garage door partly open with a one-way plastic film
damper over the bottom gap and make a trap door over a ceiling fan to cool
the bedroom during the day, and add a whole house fan to a bedroom window
to cool everything at night. You might add a single layer of polycarbonate
air heater glazing over the sunny walls for wintertime solar house heating.

Now, would Monsieur Klipstein have an opinion as to the change in output
and lifetime after adding a) a 100 resistor or b) a diode in series with
a 120 V Philips 7 W clear incandescent night light bulb?

Nick

JoelnCaryn
July 2nd 03, 08:08 PM
>My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
>doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
>garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
>outside air to circulate into the garage.
>
>I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
>hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
>the (air-conditioned) house.
>
>My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
>partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
>insulated. He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.

That can be true. I'd get a thermometer and test.

Are the walls between the house and the garage insulated? If they are, it
probably doesn't matter very much. If they aren't, I'd put Reflectix or a
similar reflective barrier on the inside of the garage doors, since you
indicate that they are sun-struck,at least until you can get around to
insulating them.

When I helped a friend of mine retrofit her house, we put a radiant barrier on
her south-facing garage door. The temperature in her garage dropped
substantially. Since the walls between the house and the garage were
uninsulated, it helped her power bill drop.

--
"...if my CURRENT-SUPPOSITIONS-intender malfunctions and tokens a |Jodie Foster
is president| when it should have tokened a |George W. Bush is president| ...
this may lead to certain false beliefs, such as the belief that I will probably
be wanting to watch more presidential addresses on television in the future..."

JoelnCaryn
July 2nd 03, 08:08 PM
>My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
>doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
>garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
>outside air to circulate into the garage.
>
>I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
>hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
>the (air-conditioned) house.
>
>My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
>partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
>insulated. He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.

That can be true. I'd get a thermometer and test.

Are the walls between the house and the garage insulated? If they are, it
probably doesn't matter very much. If they aren't, I'd put Reflectix or a
similar reflective barrier on the inside of the garage doors, since you
indicate that they are sun-struck,at least until you can get around to
insulating them.

When I helped a friend of mine retrofit her house, we put a radiant barrier on
her south-facing garage door. The temperature in her garage dropped
substantially. Since the walls between the house and the garage were
uninsulated, it helped her power bill drop.

--
"...if my CURRENT-SUPPOSITIONS-intender malfunctions and tokens a |Jodie Foster
is president| when it should have tokened a |George W. Bush is president| ...
this may lead to certain false beliefs, such as the belief that I will probably
be wanting to watch more presidential addresses on television in the future..."

July 2nd 03, 09:44 PM
(Nick Pine) wrote:

>Now, would Monsieur Klipstein have an opinion as to the change in output
>and lifetime after adding a) a 100 resistor or b) a diode in series with
>a 120 V Philips 7 W clear incandescent night light bulb?

A 100 resistor??? What about a .25 capacitor? Wouldn't that save some
kilohours? :-)

July 2nd 03, 09:44 PM
(Nick Pine) wrote:

>Now, would Monsieur Klipstein have an opinion as to the change in output
>and lifetime after adding a) a 100 resistor or b) a diode in series with
>a 120 V Philips 7 W clear incandescent night light bulb?

A 100 resistor??? What about a .25 capacitor? Wouldn't that save some
kilohours? :-)

Steve
July 2nd 03, 09:45 PM
"poohbear" > wrote in message
...
:
: My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
: doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
: garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
: outside air to circulate into the garage.
:
: I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
: hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
: the (air-conditioned) house.
:
: My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
: partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
: insulated. He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
: when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.
:
: What do think?
:
: PoohBear

The closed garage = a plenum chamber.
The heated air within the plenum will expand and create a higher pressure in
relation to the outside.
*Cracking* open the garage door by only about 6-inches or less *will* make
a difference -- the heated air within will flow outwards (albeit slowly).
The temperature difference might be slight ( ~ 5 degrees) or even quite
noticeable.
OTH, having the garage door fully open would have zero net effect due to
stasis.
--
Steve
www.ApacheTrail.com/ww/
Mesa, AZ
Penury Is the Mother of Invention

Steve
July 2nd 03, 09:45 PM
"poohbear" > wrote in message
...
:
: My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
: doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
: garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
: outside air to circulate into the garage.
:
: I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
: hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
: the (air-conditioned) house.
:
: My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
: partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
: insulated. He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
: when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.
:
: What do think?
:
: PoohBear

The closed garage = a plenum chamber.
The heated air within the plenum will expand and create a higher pressure in
relation to the outside.
*Cracking* open the garage door by only about 6-inches or less *will* make
a difference -- the heated air within will flow outwards (albeit slowly).
The temperature difference might be slight ( ~ 5 degrees) or even quite
noticeable.
OTH, having the garage door fully open would have zero net effect due to
stasis.
--
Steve
www.ApacheTrail.com/ww/
Mesa, AZ
Penury Is the Mother of Invention

poohbear
July 2nd 03, 11:36 PM
On Wed, 02 Jul 2003 16:11:31 GMT, poohbear > wrote:

Many thanks for all of your reponses.

PoohBear

poohbear
July 2nd 03, 11:36 PM
On Wed, 02 Jul 2003 16:11:31 GMT, poohbear > wrote:

Many thanks for all of your reponses.

PoohBear

Don Klipstein
July 3rd 03, 12:57 AM
In article >, Nick Pine wrote:

>Now, would Monsieur Klipstein have an opinion as to the change in output
>and lifetime after adding a) a 100 resistor or b) a diode in series with
>a 120 V Philips 7 W clear incandescent night light bulb?

With diode: Power consumption ~60% of original
Light output ~30% of original
Life expectancy ~70 times original supposedly, although
gain may be less since such a thin filament
will have substantial temperature variation
over the AC cycle with no power for half of
each cycle.

In my experience, I see nightlights with bulbs similar to these and with
diodes and the bulbs usually burn out after several years. I suspect
various vibrations passing through the house structure eventually gets to
them. They may last longer than just several years if nobody stomps their
feet nor drops heavy objects nor slams nearby doors nor the like.

With 100 ohm resistor: This drops about 5.75 volts.

power consumption bulb only ~92% of original
power consumption bulb & resistor ~97% of original
light output ~85% of original
life expectancy ~1.8 times original

- Don Klipstein )

Don Klipstein
July 3rd 03, 12:57 AM
In article >, Nick Pine wrote:

>Now, would Monsieur Klipstein have an opinion as to the change in output
>and lifetime after adding a) a 100 resistor or b) a diode in series with
>a 120 V Philips 7 W clear incandescent night light bulb?

With diode: Power consumption ~60% of original
Light output ~30% of original
Life expectancy ~70 times original supposedly, although
gain may be less since such a thin filament
will have substantial temperature variation
over the AC cycle with no power for half of
each cycle.

In my experience, I see nightlights with bulbs similar to these and with
diodes and the bulbs usually burn out after several years. I suspect
various vibrations passing through the house structure eventually gets to
them. They may last longer than just several years if nobody stomps their
feet nor drops heavy objects nor slams nearby doors nor the like.

With 100 ohm resistor: This drops about 5.75 volts.

power consumption bulb only ~92% of original
power consumption bulb & resistor ~97% of original
light output ~85% of original
life expectancy ~1.8 times original

- Don Klipstein )

Nick Pine
July 3rd 03, 01:26 AM
> wrote:

>>Now, would Monsieur Klipstein have an opinion as to the change in output
>>and lifetime after adding a) a 100 resistor...

>A 100 resistor???

Ommmmm... I'm trying to make some hard-to-replace bulbs last twice as long.

Nick

Nick Pine
July 3rd 03, 01:26 AM
> wrote:

>>Now, would Monsieur Klipstein have an opinion as to the change in output
>>and lifetime after adding a) a 100 resistor...

>A 100 resistor???

Ommmmm... I'm trying to make some hard-to-replace bulbs last twice as long.

Nick

Nick Pine
July 3rd 03, 01:40 AM
Steve > wrote:

>The closed garage = a plenum chamber.

And... I wonder why you wrote that.

>The heated air within the plenum will expand and create a higher pressure in
>relation to the outside.

Well, cooler air might flow in at the bottom and warmer air might flow out
at the top.

>*Cracking* open the garage door by only about 6-inches or less *will* make
>a difference -- the heated air within will flow outwards (albeit slowly).
>The temperature difference might be slight ( ~ 5 degrees) or even quite
>noticeable.

Opening the garage door at the bottom (which may also make a gap at the top
might lower the daytime temp rise from solar gain on the two walls, compared
to, vs keeping it closed. OTOH, the garage might be cooler if kept closed
during the day, with a coolish slab and a temp closer to the 24 hour average.

>OTH, having the garage door fully open would have zero net effect due to
>stasis.

If the "cracked door" makes the garage cooler, leaving the door wide open
should leave it even cooler during the day, with more airflow to carry away
the solar gain.

Nick

Nick Pine
July 3rd 03, 01:40 AM
Steve > wrote:

>The closed garage = a plenum chamber.

And... I wonder why you wrote that.

>The heated air within the plenum will expand and create a higher pressure in
>relation to the outside.

Well, cooler air might flow in at the bottom and warmer air might flow out
at the top.

>*Cracking* open the garage door by only about 6-inches or less *will* make
>a difference -- the heated air within will flow outwards (albeit slowly).
>The temperature difference might be slight ( ~ 5 degrees) or even quite
>noticeable.

Opening the garage door at the bottom (which may also make a gap at the top
might lower the daytime temp rise from solar gain on the two walls, compared
to, vs keeping it closed. OTOH, the garage might be cooler if kept closed
during the day, with a coolish slab and a temp closer to the 24 hour average.

>OTH, having the garage door fully open would have zero net effect due to
>stasis.

If the "cracked door" makes the garage cooler, leaving the door wide open
should leave it even cooler during the day, with more airflow to carry away
the solar gain.

Nick

Nick Pine
July 3rd 03, 01:48 AM
Don Klipstein > wrote:

>With 100 ohm resistor: This drops about 5.75 volts.
>
> power consumption bulb only ~92% of original
> power consumption bulb & resistor ~97% of original
> light output ~85% of original
> life expectancy ~1.8 times original

Thanks Don! I think I'll try this... I figured it would reduce
the voltage about 5% (with the bulb still using about 7 watts)
and increase the life by 1.05^14 = 1.98 from about 3K to 6K hrs.

Nick

----- The following addresses had permanent fatal errors -----...
(reason: 550 5.1.1 >... User unknown)

Nick Pine
July 3rd 03, 01:48 AM
Don Klipstein > wrote:

>With 100 ohm resistor: This drops about 5.75 volts.
>
> power consumption bulb only ~92% of original
> power consumption bulb & resistor ~97% of original
> light output ~85% of original
> life expectancy ~1.8 times original

Thanks Don! I think I'll try this... I figured it would reduce
the voltage about 5% (with the bulb still using about 7 watts)
and increase the life by 1.05^14 = 1.98 from about 3K to 6K hrs.

Nick

----- The following addresses had permanent fatal errors -----...
(reason: 550 5.1.1 >... User unknown)

lpogoda
July 3rd 03, 03:14 AM
poohbear wrote in message ...
>
>My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
>doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
>garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
>outside air to circulate into the garage.
>
>I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
>hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
>the (air-conditioned) house.
>
>My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
>partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
>insulated. He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.
>
I have exactly the same kind of arrangement, and have been living with it
for the last 12 years or so.

On a hot summer afternoon, after driving home from work, if I put the car in
the garage (my wife also drives home from work, so we're talking about two
cars here) and leave the doors open, the temperature in the garage will go
up by ten or more degrees. A fair amount of this heat seeps through the
insulation into the bedrooms above the garage - one of these rooms is used
as an office (I'm in it right now) and it can get pretty uncomfortable.

The situation is worse if the garage doors are closed. The garage
temperature will rise even more as the cars cool down, and the heat has to
go somewhere. I don't have a thermometer in the garage, but it feels like a
20-30 degree rise on a hot evening. That heat has to go somewhere, and some
of it ends up in the bedrooms.

In years past, we attempted to mitigate the rise in bedroom temperature by
1. Running a floor fan in the upstairs bedrooms if someone was in one of
the rooms
2. Buying a booster fan for the air conditioning duct to increase the flow
of cool air
3. Leaving the garage doors open until bedtime to let at least some of the
heat out

This all worked to some extent, but the bedrooms were still uncomfortably
hot. Then one summer morning I went to the garage to get my car and go to
work, and the place was a shambles - a raccoon had come in after dark before
we shut the doors for the night, couldn't get out when it wanted to, and
tore the place apart. Not only that, but I couldn't get it out - it
hunkered down in a corner behind some bags of fertilizer and mulch and the
more I tried to chivvy it out the more viciously it behaved. I decided
discretion was the better part of valor and left for work with the garage
door open about a foot, and thankfully it was gone when we got home that
afternoon.

So now, I leave the garage doors closed. On hot nights, we park the cars in
the driveway when we get home instead of in the garage. The garage is still
warmer than the conditioned temperature of the living space, but not as hot
as the outdoors. And the bedrooms are _much_ cooler. In the winter, of
course, parking warm cars in the garage and shutting the doors is
advantageous.

Anyway, if the garage interior is hotter than the outside air and the
upstairs rooms are warmer than you'd like, it makes sense to open the doors
to let the heat out. If it's warmer because you've parked a hot car inside
and closed the doors, it makes more sense to leave the car outside the
garage entirely.

lpogoda
July 3rd 03, 03:14 AM
poohbear wrote in message ...
>
>My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
>doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
>garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
>outside air to circulate into the garage.
>
>I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
>hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
>the (air-conditioned) house.
>
>My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
>partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
>insulated. He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.
>
I have exactly the same kind of arrangement, and have been living with it
for the last 12 years or so.

On a hot summer afternoon, after driving home from work, if I put the car in
the garage (my wife also drives home from work, so we're talking about two
cars here) and leave the doors open, the temperature in the garage will go
up by ten or more degrees. A fair amount of this heat seeps through the
insulation into the bedrooms above the garage - one of these rooms is used
as an office (I'm in it right now) and it can get pretty uncomfortable.

The situation is worse if the garage doors are closed. The garage
temperature will rise even more as the cars cool down, and the heat has to
go somewhere. I don't have a thermometer in the garage, but it feels like a
20-30 degree rise on a hot evening. That heat has to go somewhere, and some
of it ends up in the bedrooms.

In years past, we attempted to mitigate the rise in bedroom temperature by
1. Running a floor fan in the upstairs bedrooms if someone was in one of
the rooms
2. Buying a booster fan for the air conditioning duct to increase the flow
of cool air
3. Leaving the garage doors open until bedtime to let at least some of the
heat out

This all worked to some extent, but the bedrooms were still uncomfortably
hot. Then one summer morning I went to the garage to get my car and go to
work, and the place was a shambles - a raccoon had come in after dark before
we shut the doors for the night, couldn't get out when it wanted to, and
tore the place apart. Not only that, but I couldn't get it out - it
hunkered down in a corner behind some bags of fertilizer and mulch and the
more I tried to chivvy it out the more viciously it behaved. I decided
discretion was the better part of valor and left for work with the garage
door open about a foot, and thankfully it was gone when we got home that
afternoon.

So now, I leave the garage doors closed. On hot nights, we park the cars in
the driveway when we get home instead of in the garage. The garage is still
warmer than the conditioned temperature of the living space, but not as hot
as the outdoors. And the bedrooms are _much_ cooler. In the winter, of
course, parking warm cars in the garage and shutting the doors is
advantageous.

Anyway, if the garage interior is hotter than the outside air and the
upstairs rooms are warmer than you'd like, it makes sense to open the doors
to let the heat out. If it's warmer because you've parked a hot car inside
and closed the doors, it makes more sense to leave the car outside the
garage entirely.

lpogoda
July 3rd 03, 03:25 AM
JoelnCaryn wrote in message
>...
>>My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
>>doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
>>garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
>>outside air to circulate into the garage.
>>
>>I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
>>hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
>>the (air-conditioned) house.
>>
>>My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
>>partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
>>insulated. He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>>when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.
>
>That can be true. I'd get a thermometer and test.

It's not all that hard to tell if it's warmer or cooler in the garage or
outside. Just go stand in each place for a few seconds. Granted, that's a
qualitative evaluation, not a quantitative one, but we're not talking about
installing HVAC equipment, just whether opening or closing a door would be
helpful.

>Are the walls between the house and the garage insulated? If they are, it
>probably doesn't matter very much.

In my case, the garage ceiling (which is the floor of the front upstairs
bedrooms) and the connecting wall are insulated, and the difference in
comfort level in the upstairs rooms is big, depending on whether or not a
hot car or two is (are) sealed in the garage (see my other post in this
thread). In my case, on a hot day the garage is cooler than outside if the
doors are kept closed - the Sun shines directly on the doors (if closed) or
into the garage (if open) from dawn until around 11 AM (in the summer).

lpogoda
July 3rd 03, 03:25 AM
JoelnCaryn wrote in message
>...
>>My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
>>doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
>>garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
>>outside air to circulate into the garage.
>>
>>I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
>>hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
>>the (air-conditioned) house.
>>
>>My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
>>partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
>>insulated. He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>>when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.
>
>That can be true. I'd get a thermometer and test.

It's not all that hard to tell if it's warmer or cooler in the garage or
outside. Just go stand in each place for a few seconds. Granted, that's a
qualitative evaluation, not a quantitative one, but we're not talking about
installing HVAC equipment, just whether opening or closing a door would be
helpful.

>Are the walls between the house and the garage insulated? If they are, it
>probably doesn't matter very much.

In my case, the garage ceiling (which is the floor of the front upstairs
bedrooms) and the connecting wall are insulated, and the difference in
comfort level in the upstairs rooms is big, depending on whether or not a
hot car or two is (are) sealed in the garage (see my other post in this
thread). In my case, on a hot day the garage is cooler than outside if the
doors are kept closed - the Sun shines directly on the doors (if closed) or
into the garage (if open) from dawn until around 11 AM (in the summer).

JoelnCaryn
July 3rd 03, 07:32 AM
>>That can be true. I'd get a thermometer and test.
>
>It's not all that hard to tell if it's warmer or cooler in the garage or
>outside. Just go stand in each place for a few seconds. Granted, that's a
>qualitative evaluation, not a quantitative one, but we're not talking about
>installing HVAC equipment, just whether opening or closing a door would be
>helpful.

Depends on where you're located. I can't actually tell the difference between
115F outside standing in full sun but with my head pointed at sky and 125F
inside a closed but shady garage. They're both too damn hot.

And yes, that was with a thermometer. :-)

--
"...if my CURRENT-SUPPOSITIONS-intender malfunctions and tokens a |Jodie Foster
is president| when it should have tokened a |George W. Bush is president|
....this may lead to certain false beliefs, such as the belief that I will
probably be wanting to watch more presidential addresses on television in the
future..."

JoelnCaryn
July 3rd 03, 07:32 AM
>>That can be true. I'd get a thermometer and test.
>
>It's not all that hard to tell if it's warmer or cooler in the garage or
>outside. Just go stand in each place for a few seconds. Granted, that's a
>qualitative evaluation, not a quantitative one, but we're not talking about
>installing HVAC equipment, just whether opening or closing a door would be
>helpful.

Depends on where you're located. I can't actually tell the difference between
115F outside standing in full sun but with my head pointed at sky and 125F
inside a closed but shady garage. They're both too damn hot.

And yes, that was with a thermometer. :-)

--
"...if my CURRENT-SUPPOSITIONS-intender malfunctions and tokens a |Jodie Foster
is president| when it should have tokened a |George W. Bush is president|
....this may lead to certain false beliefs, such as the belief that I will
probably be wanting to watch more presidential addresses on television in the
future..."

Don K
July 4th 03, 01:01 AM
"Don Klipstein" > wrote in message
...
> In article >, Nick Pine wrote:
>
> >Now, would Monsieur Klipstein have an opinion as to the change in output
> >and lifetime after adding a) a 100 resistor or b) a diode in series with
> >a 120 V Philips 7 W clear incandescent night light bulb?

> With 100 ohm resistor: This drops about 5.75 volts.
>
> power consumption bulb only ~92% of original
> power consumption bulb & resistor ~97% of original
> light output ~85% of original
> life expectancy ~1.8 times original

Maybe this could be done more efficiently by choosing an
appropriate low voltage 2nd bulb to put in series with the 7W bulb.

At least it could put out more light than the resistor. ;-)

Don

Don K
July 4th 03, 01:01 AM
"Don Klipstein" > wrote in message
...
> In article >, Nick Pine wrote:
>
> >Now, would Monsieur Klipstein have an opinion as to the change in output
> >and lifetime after adding a) a 100 resistor or b) a diode in series with
> >a 120 V Philips 7 W clear incandescent night light bulb?

> With 100 ohm resistor: This drops about 5.75 volts.
>
> power consumption bulb only ~92% of original
> power consumption bulb & resistor ~97% of original
> light output ~85% of original
> life expectancy ~1.8 times original

Maybe this could be done more efficiently by choosing an
appropriate low voltage 2nd bulb to put in series with the 7W bulb.

At least it could put out more light than the resistor. ;-)

Don

Neil
July 4th 03, 07:24 AM
poohbear > wrote in message >...
> My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
> doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
> garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
> outside air to circulate into the garage.
>
> I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
> hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
> the (air-conditioned) house.

That's what I think also. Closing the garage will help insulate and
seal your air-conditioned house. With air conditioning (in summer) and
heating (in winter), you need to insulate your house as much as
possible from the outside air.

> My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
> partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
> insulated.

Just closing the garage door and keeping the house as sealed as
possible should keep the house better insulated and let the air
conditioning run less.

> He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
> when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.

I think the more air you have circulating, the less stable your
house's internal temperature will be. I'd keep all doors and windows
shut, even that garage door. The more air that circulates, the more
your cold air inside will leak out and dissipate

Think of your house as filled with cold water. The outside air is hot
water. To keep the water cold inside your house, you'll want to keep
it away from the hot water, right? So keep your home as closed as
possible, including keeping the garage door closed.

In the winter, you can think of your house as full of hot water that
you want to keep away from the cold water. So in the winter, you'll
also want to keep that garage door closed.

> What do think?

If you really want to save $$$, have a quieter home, cheaper utility
bills, and have less wear and tear on your air conditioning and
heating system, then add insulation to your house. More insulation
will keep your home's inside temperature more stable and cooler in
summer and warmer in winter.

Neil
July 4th 03, 07:24 AM
poohbear > wrote in message >...
> My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
> doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
> garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
> outside air to circulate into the garage.
>
> I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
> hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
> the (air-conditioned) house.

That's what I think also. Closing the garage will help insulate and
seal your air-conditioned house. With air conditioning (in summer) and
heating (in winter), you need to insulate your house as much as
possible from the outside air.

> My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
> partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
> insulated.

Just closing the garage door and keeping the house as sealed as
possible should keep the house better insulated and let the air
conditioning run less.

> He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
> when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.

I think the more air you have circulating, the less stable your
house's internal temperature will be. I'd keep all doors and windows
shut, even that garage door. The more air that circulates, the more
your cold air inside will leak out and dissipate

Think of your house as filled with cold water. The outside air is hot
water. To keep the water cold inside your house, you'll want to keep
it away from the hot water, right? So keep your home as closed as
possible, including keeping the garage door closed.

In the winter, you can think of your house as full of hot water that
you want to keep away from the cold water. So in the winter, you'll
also want to keep that garage door closed.

> What do think?

If you really want to save $$$, have a quieter home, cheaper utility
bills, and have less wear and tear on your air conditioning and
heating system, then add insulation to your house. More insulation
will keep your home's inside temperature more stable and cooler in
summer and warmer in winter.

lpogoda
July 4th 03, 06:05 PM
Neil wrote in message ...
>poohbear > wrote in message
>...
>> My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
>> doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
>> garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
>> outside air to circulate into the garage.
>>
>> I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
>> hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
>> the (air-conditioned) house.
>
>That's what I think also. Closing the garage will help insulate and
>seal your air-conditioned house. With air conditioning (in summer) and
>heating (in winter), you need to insulate your house as much as
>possible from the outside air.
>
>> My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
>> partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
>> insulated.
>
>Just closing the garage door and keeping the house as sealed as
>possible should keep the house better insulated and let the air
>conditioning run less.
>
>> He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>> when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.
>
>I think the more air you have circulating, the less stable your
>house's internal temperature will be. I'd keep all doors and windows
>shut, even that garage door. The more air that circulates, the more
>your cold air inside will leak out and dissipate
>
>Think of your house as filled with cold water. The outside air is hot
>water. To keep the water cold inside your house, you'll want to keep
>it away from the hot water, right? So keep your home as closed as
>possible, including keeping the garage door closed.

I guess you didn't read the full description - according to the original
post, the garage is HOTTER with the door closed than it would be if the door
was open.

lpogoda
July 4th 03, 06:05 PM
Neil wrote in message ...
>poohbear > wrote in message
>...
>> My husband and I disagree about whether or not to keep our garage
>> doors open on hot summer days (there are bedrooms above the 2 door
>> garage). He says it cools the house and garage by allowing the
>> outside air to circulate into the garage.
>>
>> I say keeping the garage (insulated) doors closed keeps the outside
>> hot air from coming into the garage and thereby heating up the rest of
>> the (air-conditioned) house.
>
>That's what I think also. Closing the garage will help insulate and
>seal your air-conditioned house. With air conditioning (in summer) and
>heating (in winter), you need to insulate your house as much as
>possible from the outside air.
>
>> My husband replies by indicating that the garage doors are only
>> partially insulated and the two walls (front and side) are not
>> insulated.
>
>Just closing the garage door and keeping the house as sealed as
>possible should keep the house better insulated and let the air
>conditioning run less.
>
>> He says it is hotter in the garage than the outside air,
>> when the sun hits the garage doors and un-insulated walls.
>
>I think the more air you have circulating, the less stable your
>house's internal temperature will be. I'd keep all doors and windows
>shut, even that garage door. The more air that circulates, the more
>your cold air inside will leak out and dissipate
>
>Think of your house as filled with cold water. The outside air is hot
>water. To keep the water cold inside your house, you'll want to keep
>it away from the hot water, right? So keep your home as closed as
>possible, including keeping the garage door closed.

I guess you didn't read the full description - according to the original
post, the garage is HOTTER with the door closed than it would be if the door
was open.

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