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dnrg
July 4th 03, 05:03 PM
Have anticavity rinses actually been proven (in more than one study of
course, and in peer-reviewed medical journals) to have an effect on
cavities? If so, how much of an effect? A significant effect?
Insignificant? Somewhere in between?


Thanks in advance.

- Dana

Don K
July 4th 03, 05:32 PM
"dnrg" > wrote in message
om...
> Have anticavity rinses actually been proven (in more than one study of
> course, and in peer-reviewed medical journals) to have an effect on
> cavities? If so, how much of an effect? A significant effect?
> Insignificant? Somewhere in between?

And while you're at it, please list the effectiveness of any and all
products that have been studied repeatedly in peer-reviewed
medical journals and please summarize the effectiveness of
each one.

This would be a big help to me.

Thanks in advance.

Don

Don K
July 4th 03, 05:32 PM
"dnrg" > wrote in message
om...
> Have anticavity rinses actually been proven (in more than one study of
> course, and in peer-reviewed medical journals) to have an effect on
> cavities? If so, how much of an effect? A significant effect?
> Insignificant? Somewhere in between?

And while you're at it, please list the effectiveness of any and all
products that have been studied repeatedly in peer-reviewed
medical journals and please summarize the effectiveness of
each one.

This would be a big help to me.

Thanks in advance.

Don

July 5th 03, 09:09 AM
My dentist said the rinses are bad for you. They usually contain sugar
and other ingredients that do more harm than good at preventing
cavities. He recommends good brushing habits and a peroxide and water
rinse.

July 5th 03, 09:09 AM
My dentist said the rinses are bad for you. They usually contain sugar
and other ingredients that do more harm than good at preventing
cavities. He recommends good brushing habits and a peroxide and water
rinse.

Tomcat14
July 5th 03, 12:20 PM
"Don K" > wrote in message >...
> "dnrg" > wrote in message
> om...
> > Have anticavity rinses actually been proven (in more than one study of
> > course, and in peer-reviewed medical journals) to have an effect on
> > cavities? If so, how much of an effect? A significant effect?
> > Insignificant? Somewhere in between?
>
> And while you're at it, please list the effectiveness of any and all
> products that have been studied repeatedly in peer-reviewed
> medical journals and please summarize the effectiveness of
> each one.
>
> This would be a big help to me.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Don

This sounds like a college student who wants to go to the beach while
the world does her research for her.

Tomcat14
July 5th 03, 12:20 PM
"Don K" > wrote in message >...
> "dnrg" > wrote in message
> om...
> > Have anticavity rinses actually been proven (in more than one study of
> > course, and in peer-reviewed medical journals) to have an effect on
> > cavities? If so, how much of an effect? A significant effect?
> > Insignificant? Somewhere in between?
>
> And while you're at it, please list the effectiveness of any and all
> products that have been studied repeatedly in peer-reviewed
> medical journals and please summarize the effectiveness of
> each one.
>
> This would be a big help to me.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Don

This sounds like a college student who wants to go to the beach while
the world does her research for her.

dnrg
July 5th 03, 02:42 PM
wrote in message >...
> My dentist said the rinses are bad for you. They usually contain sugar
> and other ingredients that do more harm than good at preventing
> cavities. He recommends good brushing habits and a peroxide and water
> rinse.

Thanks Scout. I checked the American Dental Association's web site and
it seems the fluoride rinses aren't all that much better than rinsing
with water. Well, it was ambiguous anyway about what an authoritative
or final answer would be.

I'm wondering if consumer reports has done any research on anticavity
rinses. They seem pretty "no nonsense" and accurate most of the time.

As for the folks with negative attitudes and nothing better to do than
attacking someone for asking a question-- as Rodney Dangerfield would
say, "you're *way* off." :-)

Peace.

- Dana

dnrg
July 5th 03, 02:42 PM
wrote in message >...
> My dentist said the rinses are bad for you. They usually contain sugar
> and other ingredients that do more harm than good at preventing
> cavities. He recommends good brushing habits and a peroxide and water
> rinse.

Thanks Scout. I checked the American Dental Association's web site and
it seems the fluoride rinses aren't all that much better than rinsing
with water. Well, it was ambiguous anyway about what an authoritative
or final answer would be.

I'm wondering if consumer reports has done any research on anticavity
rinses. They seem pretty "no nonsense" and accurate most of the time.

As for the folks with negative attitudes and nothing better to do than
attacking someone for asking a question-- as Rodney Dangerfield would
say, "you're *way* off." :-)

Peace.

- Dana

Don K
July 5th 03, 03:05 PM
"dnrg" > wrote in message
m...
> wrote in message
>...
> As for the folks with negative attitudes and nothing better to do than
> attacking someone for asking a question-- as Rodney Dangerfield would
> say, "you're *way* off." :-)
>
> Peace.
>
> - Dana

No offense. I just thought the over-specification of what constituted
an acceptable reply was funny-- it had to be more than one study
and in peer-reviewed medical journals.

I think Rodney Dangerfield would have had a field day with it. :-)

Don

Don K
July 5th 03, 03:05 PM
"dnrg" > wrote in message
m...
> wrote in message
>...
> As for the folks with negative attitudes and nothing better to do than
> attacking someone for asking a question-- as Rodney Dangerfield would
> say, "you're *way* off." :-)
>
> Peace.
>
> - Dana

No offense. I just thought the over-specification of what constituted
an acceptable reply was funny-- it had to be more than one study
and in peer-reviewed medical journals.

I think Rodney Dangerfield would have had a field day with it. :-)

Don

Tsu Dho Poster
July 5th 03, 06:00 PM
"dnrg" > wrote in message news:c1888d06.0307
> Have anticavity rinses actually been proven (in more than one study of
> course, and in peer-reviewed medical journals) to have an effect on
> cavities? If so, how much of an effect? A significant effect?
> Insignificant? Somewhere in between?
>
>
Imo, if you found a dozen studies that qualified, it'd be a safe bet the
conclusions would vary considerably.
Cavity formation require 3 things:
a tooth
bacteria
fermentable carbs, (just about any food/beverage)
------------------
I've never watched, but the bacteria eats the carbs & produces an acidic
by-product, similar to urine, actually. The acid demineralizes the tooth.
The tooth gradually weakens, then collapses, causing a hole (cavity).
Much of this acid by-product & bacteria can be removed by
brushing/flossing/rinse. Then your saliva can remineralize your teeth.
That's the theory, anyway.

just brush & rinse after eating, especially after snacks/sweets (just my non
peer-reviewed opinion)

chk: sci.med.dentistry for a professional opinion

<Jon K>
(just remembered to brush my teeth, thanx)

Tsu Dho Poster
July 5th 03, 06:00 PM
"dnrg" > wrote in message news:c1888d06.0307
> Have anticavity rinses actually been proven (in more than one study of
> course, and in peer-reviewed medical journals) to have an effect on
> cavities? If so, how much of an effect? A significant effect?
> Insignificant? Somewhere in between?
>
>
Imo, if you found a dozen studies that qualified, it'd be a safe bet the
conclusions would vary considerably.
Cavity formation require 3 things:
a tooth
bacteria
fermentable carbs, (just about any food/beverage)
------------------
I've never watched, but the bacteria eats the carbs & produces an acidic
by-product, similar to urine, actually. The acid demineralizes the tooth.
The tooth gradually weakens, then collapses, causing a hole (cavity).
Much of this acid by-product & bacteria can be removed by
brushing/flossing/rinse. Then your saliva can remineralize your teeth.
That's the theory, anyway.

just brush & rinse after eating, especially after snacks/sweets (just my non
peer-reviewed opinion)

chk: sci.med.dentistry for a professional opinion

<Jon K>
(just remembered to brush my teeth, thanx)

dnrg
July 5th 03, 08:57 PM
"Don K" > wrote in message news:<CeudnUHMH_-
> No offense. I just thought the over-specification of what constituted
> an acceptable reply was funny-- it had to be more than one study
> and in peer-reviewed medical journals.
> I think Rodney Dangerfield would have had a field day with it. :-)

Well hey, if we can't laugh at ourselves we shouldn't laugh at others.
:-)

Yeah, I was a bit, um, clinical (!) in my post, but that's what
science is; you can have one study that shows good results; but if the
results aren't replicable elsewhere it ain't science and it ain't
necessarily reliable.

Vendors of all kinds of snake oil-like products love to quote single
studies in isolation, backing it all up with money-back guarantees
that they know nearly no one will take advantage of (because "we're"
[society at large] collectively pretty lazy about taking companies up
on money back guarantees.

I'm no scientist, but I am a pretty skeptical person; 'specially when
it comes to being parted from my hard-earned cash. :-)

- Dana

dnrg
July 5th 03, 08:57 PM
"Don K" > wrote in message news:<CeudnUHMH_-
> No offense. I just thought the over-specification of what constituted
> an acceptable reply was funny-- it had to be more than one study
> and in peer-reviewed medical journals.
> I think Rodney Dangerfield would have had a field day with it. :-)

Well hey, if we can't laugh at ourselves we shouldn't laugh at others.
:-)

Yeah, I was a bit, um, clinical (!) in my post, but that's what
science is; you can have one study that shows good results; but if the
results aren't replicable elsewhere it ain't science and it ain't
necessarily reliable.

Vendors of all kinds of snake oil-like products love to quote single
studies in isolation, backing it all up with money-back guarantees
that they know nearly no one will take advantage of (because "we're"
[society at large] collectively pretty lazy about taking companies up
on money back guarantees.

I'm no scientist, but I am a pretty skeptical person; 'specially when
it comes to being parted from my hard-earned cash. :-)

- Dana

Sally
July 6th 03, 04:41 PM
(dnrg) wrote in message >...
> Have anticavity rinses actually been proven (in more than one study of
> course, and in peer-reviewed medical journals) to have an effect on
> cavities? If so, how much of an effect? A significant effect?
> Insignificant? Somewhere in between?
>
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> - Dana

Fluoride Mouth Rinses and Tablets Ineffective


“One of the most surprising and controversial findings of the
National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program concerned the lack
of effectiveness of fluoride mouth rinsing and fluoride tablets in
preventing tooth decay in children,” reports Paul Brodeur in
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Anthology To Improve Health and
Health Care 2001.(A)

The rest with references is here:
http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/11749/99562

Sally

Fluoridation Editor
Suite 101
http://www.suite101.com/welcome.cfm/fluoridation

Sally
July 6th 03, 04:41 PM
(dnrg) wrote in message >...
> Have anticavity rinses actually been proven (in more than one study of
> course, and in peer-reviewed medical journals) to have an effect on
> cavities? If so, how much of an effect? A significant effect?
> Insignificant? Somewhere in between?
>
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> - Dana

Fluoride Mouth Rinses and Tablets Ineffective


“One of the most surprising and controversial findings of the
National Preventive Dentistry Demonstration Program concerned the lack
of effectiveness of fluoride mouth rinsing and fluoride tablets in
preventing tooth decay in children,” reports Paul Brodeur in
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Anthology To Improve Health and
Health Care 2001.(A)

The rest with references is here:
http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/11749/99562

Sally

Fluoridation Editor
Suite 101
http://www.suite101.com/welcome.cfm/fluoridation

Tomcat14
July 7th 03, 03:04 PM
"Tsu Dho Poster" > wrote in message >...
> "dnrg" > wrote in message news:c1888d06.0307
> > Have anticavity rinses actually been proven (in more than one study of
> > course, and in peer-reviewed medical journals) to have an effect on
> > cavities? If so, how much of an effect? A significant effect?
> > Insignificant? Somewhere in between?
> >
> >
> Imo, if you found a dozen studies that qualified, it'd be a safe bet the
> conclusions would vary considerably.
> Cavity formation require 3 things:
> a tooth
> bacteria
> fermentable carbs, (just about any food/beverage)
> ------------------
> I've never watched, but the bacteria eats the carbs & produces an acidic
> by-product, similar to urine, actually. The acid demineralizes the tooth.
> The tooth gradually weakens, then collapses, causing a hole (cavity).
> Much of this acid by-product & bacteria can be removed by
> brushing/flossing/rinse. Then your saliva can remineralize your teeth.
> That's the theory, anyway.
>
> just brush & rinse after eating, especially after snacks/sweets (just my non
> peer-reviewed opinion)
>
> chk: sci.med.dentistry for a professional opinion
>
> <Jon K>
> (just remembered to brush my teeth, thanx)

There has also been some controversy over whether the alcohol in
anti-plaque rinses causes throat cancer. It takes more than one study
to be meaningful because a tiny difference in numbers can be
statistically significant and yet the difference in risk may be
insignificant to most people.
I recently started using salt water instead.

Tomcat14
July 7th 03, 03:04 PM
"Tsu Dho Poster" > wrote in message >...
> "dnrg" > wrote in message news:c1888d06.0307
> > Have anticavity rinses actually been proven (in more than one study of
> > course, and in peer-reviewed medical journals) to have an effect on
> > cavities? If so, how much of an effect? A significant effect?
> > Insignificant? Somewhere in between?
> >
> >
> Imo, if you found a dozen studies that qualified, it'd be a safe bet the
> conclusions would vary considerably.
> Cavity formation require 3 things:
> a tooth
> bacteria
> fermentable carbs, (just about any food/beverage)
> ------------------
> I've never watched, but the bacteria eats the carbs & produces an acidic
> by-product, similar to urine, actually. The acid demineralizes the tooth.
> The tooth gradually weakens, then collapses, causing a hole (cavity).
> Much of this acid by-product & bacteria can be removed by
> brushing/flossing/rinse. Then your saliva can remineralize your teeth.
> That's the theory, anyway.
>
> just brush & rinse after eating, especially after snacks/sweets (just my non
> peer-reviewed opinion)
>
> chk: sci.med.dentistry for a professional opinion
>
> <Jon K>
> (just remembered to brush my teeth, thanx)

There has also been some controversy over whether the alcohol in
anti-plaque rinses causes throat cancer. It takes more than one study
to be meaningful because a tiny difference in numbers can be
statistically significant and yet the difference in risk may be
insignificant to most people.
I recently started using salt water instead.

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