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Albert Wagner
July 4th 03, 10:25 PM
On 05 Jul 2003 00:37:15 GMT
(Ablang) wrote:

> used kitty litter & gardening?
>
> Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left
> by kitty poop.
>
> Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
No, but the vegetables so grown are bad for people.

Albert Wagner
July 4th 03, 10:25 PM
On 05 Jul 2003 00:37:15 GMT
(Ablang) wrote:

> used kitty litter & gardening?
>
> Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left
> by kitty poop.
>
> Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
No, but the vegetables so grown are bad for people.

Ablang
July 5th 03, 02:37 AM
used kitty litter & gardening?

Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by kitty
poop.

Is used kitty little really bad for plants?

-- "I'm 30 years too young to date Anna Nicole Smith, and I'm 30 years too old
to date Demi Moore."
Arnold Schwarzanegger, referring to being 55 years old

Tish Wolfe
July 5th 03, 05:07 AM
"Ablang" > wrote in message
...
> Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
kitty
> poop.
>
> Is used kitty little really bad for plants?

Two problems:
1. Cat feces could have worms or other parasites, especially if you have
cats that roam outdoors.
2. Fresh manure can "burn" plants. Better to add it to a compost pile and
let it cook -- but you can't be sure that the compost pile would get hot
enough to kill parasites and worms.

More info:
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/ITG_January98.html

Tish Wolfe
July 5th 03, 05:07 AM
"Ablang" > wrote in message
...
> Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
kitty
> poop.
>
> Is used kitty little really bad for plants?

Two problems:
1. Cat feces could have worms or other parasites, especially if you have
cats that roam outdoors.
2. Fresh manure can "burn" plants. Better to add it to a compost pile and
let it cook -- but you can't be sure that the compost pile would get hot
enough to kill parasites and worms.

More info:
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/ITG_January98.html

Frank White
July 5th 03, 04:06 PM
In article <[email protected]>, says...
>
>"Ablang" > wrote in message
...
>> Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
>> purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
>kitty
>> poop.
>>
>> Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
>
>Two problems:
>1. Cat feces could have worms or other parasites, especially if you have
>cats that roam outdoors.
>2. Fresh manure can "burn" plants. Better to add it to a compost pile and
>let it cook -- but you can't be sure that the compost pile would get hot
>enough to kill parasites and worms.

You can if you use the 14 day composting method, with enough fresh
manure to make the pile get REALLY hot...

FW

Frank White
July 5th 03, 04:06 PM
In article <[email protected]>, says...
>
>"Ablang" > wrote in message
...
>> Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
>> purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
>kitty
>> poop.
>>
>> Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
>
>Two problems:
>1. Cat feces could have worms or other parasites, especially if you have
>cats that roam outdoors.
>2. Fresh manure can "burn" plants. Better to add it to a compost pile and
>let it cook -- but you can't be sure that the compost pile would get hot
>enough to kill parasites and worms.

You can if you use the 14 day composting method, with enough fresh
manure to make the pile get REALLY hot...

FW

lpogoda
July 5th 03, 05:14 PM
Ablang wrote in message >...
>used kitty litter & gardening?
>
>Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
>purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
kitty
>poop.
>
>Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
>

Why is it I get the impression you're going to ask this question until
someone says "Oh, go ahead."? What's your premise here - that the people
who make cat litter also make garden fertilizer, and they're trying to
maximize sales of the latter? Maybe it's just that you've never heard of
toxoplasmosis? Or maybe you don't mind walking in fresh fecal matter of any
type?

lpogoda
July 5th 03, 05:14 PM
Ablang wrote in message >...
>used kitty litter & gardening?
>
>Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
>purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
kitty
>poop.
>
>Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
>

Why is it I get the impression you're going to ask this question until
someone says "Oh, go ahead."? What's your premise here - that the people
who make cat litter also make garden fertilizer, and they're trying to
maximize sales of the latter? Maybe it's just that you've never heard of
toxoplasmosis? Or maybe you don't mind walking in fresh fecal matter of any
type?

dogsnus
July 5th 03, 05:59 PM
(Ablang) wrote in
:

> used kitty litter & gardening?
>
> Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
> kitty poop.
I can't think of any reason to use manure or urine from a carnivoure
on a garden, especially an edible one.


>
> Is used kitty little really bad for plants?

It's not the plants, it's the nasty stuff in the cat box
(and cat),that can cause problems for humans.
Besides, who really wants to dig down in the soil and put their
hand into cat or even dog crap, for that matter?


I use nothing but herbivore fertilizers on my garden.
I'm also picky enough not to use reclycled fresh stuff
too, as it's full of weed seeds that just sprout and have
to be pulled later on. I put stearlized steer manure
in my garden and till it in. I have a 1/2 acre garden
and have been a home canner for years.

Terri

dogsnus
July 5th 03, 05:59 PM
(Ablang) wrote in
:

> used kitty litter & gardening?
>
> Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
> kitty poop.
I can't think of any reason to use manure or urine from a carnivoure
on a garden, especially an edible one.


>
> Is used kitty little really bad for plants?

It's not the plants, it's the nasty stuff in the cat box
(and cat),that can cause problems for humans.
Besides, who really wants to dig down in the soil and put their
hand into cat or even dog crap, for that matter?


I use nothing but herbivore fertilizers on my garden.
I'm also picky enough not to use reclycled fresh stuff
too, as it's full of weed seeds that just sprout and have
to be pulled later on. I put stearlized steer manure
in my garden and till it in. I have a 1/2 acre garden
and have been a home canner for years.

Terri

Edgar S.
July 5th 03, 07:09 PM
"Tish Wolfe" > wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> "Ablang" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> > purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
> kitty
> > poop.
> >
> > Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
>
> Two problems:
> 1. Cat feces could have worms or other parasites, especially if you have
> cats that roam outdoors.
> 2. Fresh manure can "burn" plants. Better to add it to a compost pile and
> let it cook -- but you can't be sure that the compost pile would get hot
> enough to kill parasites and worms.

sorry, that's erroneous info about composting. Manure of all sorts
composts down just fine. The pile can get very hot for brief periods,
or not as hot for a longer time. IN the end, it ALL ends up compost.

Edgar S.
July 5th 03, 07:09 PM
"Tish Wolfe" > wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> "Ablang" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> > purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
> kitty
> > poop.
> >
> > Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
>
> Two problems:
> 1. Cat feces could have worms or other parasites, especially if you have
> cats that roam outdoors.
> 2. Fresh manure can "burn" plants. Better to add it to a compost pile and
> let it cook -- but you can't be sure that the compost pile would get hot
> enough to kill parasites and worms.

sorry, that's erroneous info about composting. Manure of all sorts
composts down just fine. The pile can get very hot for brief periods,
or not as hot for a longer time. IN the end, it ALL ends up compost.

Edgar S.
July 6th 03, 04:34 AM
"lpogoda" > wrote in message >...
> Ablang wrote in message >...
> >used kitty litter & gardening?
> >
> >Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> >purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
> kitty
> >poop.
> >
> >Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
> >
>
> Why is it I get the impression you're going to ask this question until
> someone says "Oh, go ahead."?

1. We have composted the spent contents of our catbox for a decade
with no bad results. I like to think of all the landfill space and
transportation resources and reduced plaistic use saved by just
composting this entirely biodegradable material. Dust to dust and all.

Composting maunre is a good idea.


> What's your premise here - that the people
> who make cat litter also make garden fertilizer, and they're trying to
> maximize sales of the latter?

What's YOUR premise? That a perfectly NORMAL material like manure is
actually a new form of nuclear waste that will wither your body if u
stand too close to it? :)


> Maybe it's just that you've never heard of
> toxoplasmosis?

Has it occured to U that maure from her OWN spoiled, innoculated
housecats is the least of her worries? We can control our OWN pets'
manure. There are dozens of animals on every square mile of land,
poopin' their little hearts out.

Stray cats, rodents, racoons, all forms of wildlife that ISN'T pooping
on a fenced off compost heap.


> Or maybe you don't mind walking in fresh fecal matter of any
> type?

Welcome to planet Earth. When we lived in town, I just used to pray
the crap I just stepped in wasn't HUMAN ****. Too often...it was.

Edgar S.
July 6th 03, 04:34 AM
"lpogoda" > wrote in message >...
> Ablang wrote in message >...
> >used kitty litter & gardening?
> >
> >Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> >purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
> kitty
> >poop.
> >
> >Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
> >
>
> Why is it I get the impression you're going to ask this question until
> someone says "Oh, go ahead."?

1. We have composted the spent contents of our catbox for a decade
with no bad results. I like to think of all the landfill space and
transportation resources and reduced plaistic use saved by just
composting this entirely biodegradable material. Dust to dust and all.

Composting maunre is a good idea.


> What's your premise here - that the people
> who make cat litter also make garden fertilizer, and they're trying to
> maximize sales of the latter?

What's YOUR premise? That a perfectly NORMAL material like manure is
actually a new form of nuclear waste that will wither your body if u
stand too close to it? :)


> Maybe it's just that you've never heard of
> toxoplasmosis?

Has it occured to U that maure from her OWN spoiled, innoculated
housecats is the least of her worries? We can control our OWN pets'
manure. There are dozens of animals on every square mile of land,
poopin' their little hearts out.

Stray cats, rodents, racoons, all forms of wildlife that ISN'T pooping
on a fenced off compost heap.


> Or maybe you don't mind walking in fresh fecal matter of any
> type?

Welcome to planet Earth. When we lived in town, I just used to pray
the crap I just stepped in wasn't HUMAN ****. Too often...it was.

lpogoda
July 6th 03, 03:24 PM
Edgar S. wrote in message
>...
>"lpogoda" > wrote in message
>...
>> Ablang wrote in message >...
>> >used kitty litter & gardening?
>> >
>> >Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
>> >purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
>> kitty
>> >poop.
>> >
>> >Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
>> >
>>
>> Why is it I get the impression you're going to ask this question until
>> someone says "Oh, go ahead."?
>
>1. We have composted the spent contents of our catbox for a decade
>with no bad results. I like to think of all the landfill space and
>transportation resources and reduced plaistic use saved by just
>composting this entirely biodegradable material. Dust to dust and all.
>
>Composting maunre is a good idea.


Look, I don't know why the instructions on the bag say not to do this.
Since you haven't offered an explanation, apparently neither do you. The
manufacturer of this stuff doesn't seem to think it's a good idea. That's
not good enough for the original poster, who's evidently is willing to take
anonymous advice over the internet from someone who's completely insulated
from any consequences of that advice, so long as that advice agrees with
what s/he wants to do anyway.

>> What's your premise here - that the people
>> who make cat litter also make garden fertilizer, and they're trying to
>> maximize sales of the latter?
>
>What's YOUR premise? That a perfectly NORMAL material like manure is
>actually a new form of nuclear waste that will wither your body if u
>stand too close to it? :)


I have no premise. As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions advise
against this. The original poster apparently has some reason to believe the
reasons are invalid. I'm merely curious as to what the reasons for that
belief are.

>> Maybe it's just that you've never heard of
>> toxoplasmosis?
>
>Has it occured to U that maure from her OWN spoiled, innoculated
>housecats is the least of her worries? We can control our OWN pets'
>manure. There are dozens of animals on every square mile of land,
>poopin' their little hearts out.
>
>Stray cats, rodents, racoons, all forms of wildlife that ISN'T pooping
>on a fenced off compost heap.


Whether you like it or not, toxoplasmosis from cat litter boxes is a fact of
life. It's a minor risk for most people, even pregnant women in their first
trimester. I'm offering what rationale's I can think of for the
instructions on the bag.

>> Or maybe you don't mind walking in fresh fecal matter of any
>> type?
>
>Welcome to planet Earth. When we lived in town, I just used to pray
>the crap I just stepped in wasn't HUMAN ****. Too often...it was.

That doesn't mean I purposely put more of the stuff exactly where I'm most
likely to walk.

lpogoda
July 6th 03, 03:24 PM
Edgar S. wrote in message
>...
>"lpogoda" > wrote in message
>...
>> Ablang wrote in message >...
>> >used kitty litter & gardening?
>> >
>> >Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
>> >purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
>> kitty
>> >poop.
>> >
>> >Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
>> >
>>
>> Why is it I get the impression you're going to ask this question until
>> someone says "Oh, go ahead."?
>
>1. We have composted the spent contents of our catbox for a decade
>with no bad results. I like to think of all the landfill space and
>transportation resources and reduced plaistic use saved by just
>composting this entirely biodegradable material. Dust to dust and all.
>
>Composting maunre is a good idea.


Look, I don't know why the instructions on the bag say not to do this.
Since you haven't offered an explanation, apparently neither do you. The
manufacturer of this stuff doesn't seem to think it's a good idea. That's
not good enough for the original poster, who's evidently is willing to take
anonymous advice over the internet from someone who's completely insulated
from any consequences of that advice, so long as that advice agrees with
what s/he wants to do anyway.

>> What's your premise here - that the people
>> who make cat litter also make garden fertilizer, and they're trying to
>> maximize sales of the latter?
>
>What's YOUR premise? That a perfectly NORMAL material like manure is
>actually a new form of nuclear waste that will wither your body if u
>stand too close to it? :)


I have no premise. As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions advise
against this. The original poster apparently has some reason to believe the
reasons are invalid. I'm merely curious as to what the reasons for that
belief are.

>> Maybe it's just that you've never heard of
>> toxoplasmosis?
>
>Has it occured to U that maure from her OWN spoiled, innoculated
>housecats is the least of her worries? We can control our OWN pets'
>manure. There are dozens of animals on every square mile of land,
>poopin' their little hearts out.
>
>Stray cats, rodents, racoons, all forms of wildlife that ISN'T pooping
>on a fenced off compost heap.


Whether you like it or not, toxoplasmosis from cat litter boxes is a fact of
life. It's a minor risk for most people, even pregnant women in their first
trimester. I'm offering what rationale's I can think of for the
instructions on the bag.

>> Or maybe you don't mind walking in fresh fecal matter of any
>> type?
>
>Welcome to planet Earth. When we lived in town, I just used to pray
>the crap I just stepped in wasn't HUMAN ****. Too often...it was.

That doesn't mean I purposely put more of the stuff exactly where I'm most
likely to walk.

dogsnus
July 6th 03, 03:35 PM
(Ablang) wrote in
:

> used kitty litter & gardening?
>
> Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
> kitty poop.
>
> Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
>
If you really_ want to know the "scoop" so to speak,
post this question on rec.gardens.
They'll tell you the same thing as the intelligent
folks here: It's a BAD thing to compost cat litter
and cat feces in one's garden.
That's it, I'm outta this thread. Elame has once
again managed to show her ignorance and stubborn
stupidity.
And, YOU, have listened to someone who talks
like this on purpose:
"i thik u r jst tring tu copust kt mnr."
Nuff said.
Terri

dogsnus
July 6th 03, 03:35 PM
(Ablang) wrote in
:

> used kitty litter & gardening?
>
> Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left by
> kitty poop.
>
> Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
>
If you really_ want to know the "scoop" so to speak,
post this question on rec.gardens.
They'll tell you the same thing as the intelligent
folks here: It's a BAD thing to compost cat litter
and cat feces in one's garden.
That's it, I'm outta this thread. Elame has once
again managed to show her ignorance and stubborn
stupidity.
And, YOU, have listened to someone who talks
like this on purpose:
"i thik u r jst tring tu copust kt mnr."
Nuff said.
Terri

Chloe
July 6th 03, 04:03 PM
"lpogoda" > wrote in message
...
> Edgar S. wrote in message
> >...
> >"lpogoda" > wrote in message
> >...
> >> Ablang wrote in message
>...
> >> >used kitty litter & gardening?
> >> >
> >> >Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> >> >purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left
by
> >> kitty
> >> >poop.
> >> >
> >> >Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
> >> >
> >>
> >> Why is it I get the impression you're going to ask this question until
> >> someone says "Oh, go ahead."?
> >
> >1. We have composted the spent contents of our catbox for a decade
> >with no bad results. I like to think of all the landfill space and
> >transportation resources and reduced plaistic use saved by just
> >composting this entirely biodegradable material. Dust to dust and all.
> >
> >Composting maunre is a good idea.
>
>
> Look, I don't know why the instructions on the bag say not to do this.
> Since you haven't offered an explanation, apparently neither do you. The
> manufacturer of this stuff doesn't seem to think it's a good idea. That's
> not good enough for the original poster, who's evidently is willing to
take
> anonymous advice over the internet from someone who's completely insulated
> from any consequences of that advice, so long as that advice agrees with
> what s/he wants to do anyway.
>
> >> What's your premise here - that the people
> >> who make cat litter also make garden fertilizer, and they're trying to
> >> maximize sales of the latter?
> >
> >What's YOUR premise? That a perfectly NORMAL material like manure is
> >actually a new form of nuclear waste that will wither your body if u
> >stand too close to it? :)
>
>
> I have no premise. As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions
advise
> against this. The original poster apparently has some reason to believe
the
> reasons are invalid. I'm merely curious as to what the reasons for that
> belief are.
>
> >> Maybe it's just that you've never heard of
> >> toxoplasmosis?
> >
> >Has it occured to U that maure from her OWN spoiled, innoculated
> >housecats is the least of her worries? We can control our OWN pets'
> >manure. There are dozens of animals on every square mile of land,
> >poopin' their little hearts out.
> >
> >Stray cats, rodents, racoons, all forms of wildlife that ISN'T pooping
> >on a fenced off compost heap.
>
>
> Whether you like it or not, toxoplasmosis from cat litter boxes is a fact
of
> life. It's a minor risk for most people, even pregnant women in their
first
> trimester. I'm offering what rationale's I can think of for the
> instructions on the bag.
>
> >> Or maybe you don't mind walking in fresh fecal matter of any
> >> type?
> >
> >Welcome to planet Earth. When we lived in town, I just used to pray
> >the crap I just stepped in wasn't HUMAN ****. Too often...it was.
>
> That doesn't mean I purposely put more of the stuff exactly where I'm most
> likely to walk.

Sanitary considerations aside, the traditional clay litter would only add
more clay to the already clay-heavy soil where I live. And since cat urine
is extremely high in ammonia, I doubt if that would do my plants much good,
either.

If we are talking about clumping litter, the clumping agent would turn the
litter into hard little rocks which the roots of plants would have to find
their way around. I can't imagine that as stuff I would want in my soil.

I believe Elaine used to claim she used wood shavings as cat litter. I guess
this would eliminate the problems with clay or clumps. We just have to take
her word for it that this means of fertilizing her garden has done her no
harm. Personally I'd call undergoing a sudden gender change from "Elaine" to
"Edgar" a problem, and I'd be trying to figure out if I did something to
cause it, including looking at the idea of the cat feces in my lettuce bed
<g>.

Chloe
July 6th 03, 04:03 PM
"lpogoda" > wrote in message
...
> Edgar S. wrote in message
> >...
> >"lpogoda" > wrote in message
> >...
> >> Ablang wrote in message
>...
> >> >used kitty litter & gardening?
> >> >
> >> >Although the directions say not to use used kitty litter for gardening
> >> >purposes, it seems like it would be beneficial to gain nutrients left
by
> >> kitty
> >> >poop.
> >> >
> >> >Is used kitty little really bad for plants?
> >> >
> >>
> >> Why is it I get the impression you're going to ask this question until
> >> someone says "Oh, go ahead."?
> >
> >1. We have composted the spent contents of our catbox for a decade
> >with no bad results. I like to think of all the landfill space and
> >transportation resources and reduced plaistic use saved by just
> >composting this entirely biodegradable material. Dust to dust and all.
> >
> >Composting maunre is a good idea.
>
>
> Look, I don't know why the instructions on the bag say not to do this.
> Since you haven't offered an explanation, apparently neither do you. The
> manufacturer of this stuff doesn't seem to think it's a good idea. That's
> not good enough for the original poster, who's evidently is willing to
take
> anonymous advice over the internet from someone who's completely insulated
> from any consequences of that advice, so long as that advice agrees with
> what s/he wants to do anyway.
>
> >> What's your premise here - that the people
> >> who make cat litter also make garden fertilizer, and they're trying to
> >> maximize sales of the latter?
> >
> >What's YOUR premise? That a perfectly NORMAL material like manure is
> >actually a new form of nuclear waste that will wither your body if u
> >stand too close to it? :)
>
>
> I have no premise. As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions
advise
> against this. The original poster apparently has some reason to believe
the
> reasons are invalid. I'm merely curious as to what the reasons for that
> belief are.
>
> >> Maybe it's just that you've never heard of
> >> toxoplasmosis?
> >
> >Has it occured to U that maure from her OWN spoiled, innoculated
> >housecats is the least of her worries? We can control our OWN pets'
> >manure. There are dozens of animals on every square mile of land,
> >poopin' their little hearts out.
> >
> >Stray cats, rodents, racoons, all forms of wildlife that ISN'T pooping
> >on a fenced off compost heap.
>
>
> Whether you like it or not, toxoplasmosis from cat litter boxes is a fact
of
> life. It's a minor risk for most people, even pregnant women in their
first
> trimester. I'm offering what rationale's I can think of for the
> instructions on the bag.
>
> >> Or maybe you don't mind walking in fresh fecal matter of any
> >> type?
> >
> >Welcome to planet Earth. When we lived in town, I just used to pray
> >the crap I just stepped in wasn't HUMAN ****. Too often...it was.
>
> That doesn't mean I purposely put more of the stuff exactly where I'm most
> likely to walk.

Sanitary considerations aside, the traditional clay litter would only add
more clay to the already clay-heavy soil where I live. And since cat urine
is extremely high in ammonia, I doubt if that would do my plants much good,
either.

If we are talking about clumping litter, the clumping agent would turn the
litter into hard little rocks which the roots of plants would have to find
their way around. I can't imagine that as stuff I would want in my soil.

I believe Elaine used to claim she used wood shavings as cat litter. I guess
this would eliminate the problems with clay or clumps. We just have to take
her word for it that this means of fertilizing her garden has done her no
harm. Personally I'd call undergoing a sudden gender change from "Elaine" to
"Edgar" a problem, and I'd be trying to figure out if I did something to
cause it, including looking at the idea of the cat feces in my lettuce bed
<g>.

Edgar S.
July 6th 03, 09:51 PM
"lpogoda" > wrote in message >...

> As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions advise
> against this.

It MITE be an idea to learn something about the subject before
commenting. First of all no garden NEEDS more clay in it. Secondly,
the composting process is stiffled by clay. The perfectly natural
material, manure cannot break down normally.

Solution? Use a biodegradable litter.


> The original poster apparently has some reason to believe the
> reasons are invalid.

OBVIOUSLY it's both more frugal AND more ecological to return natural,
organic materials back to the earth.

I salute, and respect anyone who puts out the effort to live as one
with the earth. If someone can compost, and they're willing to do so,
they should.


I'm merely curious as to what the reasons for that
> belief are.

UHM.... rite offhand, I'd say.. She loved animals, plants and nature.
She would like to tread more lightly on the earth and enjoy nature
instead of abusing it.

She would like to take more responsibility for her treatment or our
little world. Perhaps even save a little money doing it.


> >> Maybe it's just that you've never heard of
> >> toxoplasmosis?
> >
> >Has it occured to U that maure from her OWN spoiled, innoculated
> >housecats is the least of her worries? We can control our OWN pets'
> >manure. There are dozens of animals on every square mile of land,
> >poopin' their little hearts out.
> >
> >Stray cats, rodents, racoons, all forms of wildlife that ISN'T pooping
> >on a fenced off compost heap.
>
>
> Whether you like it or not, toxoplasmosis from cat litter boxes is a fact of
> life.

Prove it. If u can can, I'd be happy to discuss it.

> It's a minor risk for most people, even pregnant women in their first
> trimester. I'm offering what rationale's I can think of for the
> instructions on the bag.
>
> >> Or maybe you don't mind walking in fresh fecal matter of any
> >> type?

Ok...WHERE did that come from? Composters don't "walk in" or handle
fresh manure.

the only crap any of us are going to be "walking in" is stray animal
droppings. We can control our own pets' manure.


> That doesn't mean I purposely put more of the stuff exactly where I'm most
> likely to walk.

Finished compost is not manure.

Edgar S.
July 6th 03, 09:51 PM
"lpogoda" > wrote in message >...

> As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions advise
> against this.

It MITE be an idea to learn something about the subject before
commenting. First of all no garden NEEDS more clay in it. Secondly,
the composting process is stiffled by clay. The perfectly natural
material, manure cannot break down normally.

Solution? Use a biodegradable litter.


> The original poster apparently has some reason to believe the
> reasons are invalid.

OBVIOUSLY it's both more frugal AND more ecological to return natural,
organic materials back to the earth.

I salute, and respect anyone who puts out the effort to live as one
with the earth. If someone can compost, and they're willing to do so,
they should.


I'm merely curious as to what the reasons for that
> belief are.

UHM.... rite offhand, I'd say.. She loved animals, plants and nature.
She would like to tread more lightly on the earth and enjoy nature
instead of abusing it.

She would like to take more responsibility for her treatment or our
little world. Perhaps even save a little money doing it.


> >> Maybe it's just that you've never heard of
> >> toxoplasmosis?
> >
> >Has it occured to U that maure from her OWN spoiled, innoculated
> >housecats is the least of her worries? We can control our OWN pets'
> >manure. There are dozens of animals on every square mile of land,
> >poopin' their little hearts out.
> >
> >Stray cats, rodents, racoons, all forms of wildlife that ISN'T pooping
> >on a fenced off compost heap.
>
>
> Whether you like it or not, toxoplasmosis from cat litter boxes is a fact of
> life.

Prove it. If u can can, I'd be happy to discuss it.

> It's a minor risk for most people, even pregnant women in their first
> trimester. I'm offering what rationale's I can think of for the
> instructions on the bag.
>
> >> Or maybe you don't mind walking in fresh fecal matter of any
> >> type?

Ok...WHERE did that come from? Composters don't "walk in" or handle
fresh manure.

the only crap any of us are going to be "walking in" is stray animal
droppings. We can control our own pets' manure.


> That doesn't mean I purposely put more of the stuff exactly where I'm most
> likely to walk.

Finished compost is not manure.

lpogoda
July 6th 03, 10:35 PM
Chloe wrote in message ...
>
>Sanitary considerations aside, the traditional clay litter would only add
>more clay to the already clay-heavy soil where I live. And since cat urine
>is extremely high in ammonia, I doubt if that would do my plants much good,
>either.

To be scrupulously fair about it, ammonia is used as fertilizer.

lpogoda
July 6th 03, 10:35 PM
Chloe wrote in message ...
>
>Sanitary considerations aside, the traditional clay litter would only add
>more clay to the already clay-heavy soil where I live. And since cat urine
>is extremely high in ammonia, I doubt if that would do my plants much good,
>either.

To be scrupulously fair about it, ammonia is used as fertilizer.

lpogoda
July 6th 03, 10:38 PM
Edgar S. wrote in message
>...
>"lpogoda" > wrote in message
>...
>
>> As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions advise
>> against this.
>
>It MITE be an idea to learn something about the subject before
>commenting. First of all no garden NEEDS more clay in it.

That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer than
the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15 feet.

lpogoda
July 6th 03, 10:38 PM
Edgar S. wrote in message
>...
>"lpogoda" > wrote in message
>...
>
>> As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions advise
>> against this.
>
>It MITE be an idea to learn something about the subject before
>commenting. First of all no garden NEEDS more clay in it.

That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer than
the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15 feet.

The Real Bev
July 6th 03, 11:46 PM
lpogoda wrote:
>
> Edgar S. wrote in message
> >...
> >"lpogoda" > wrote in message
> >...
> >
> >> As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions advise
> >> against this.
> >
> >It MITE be an idea to learn something about the subject before
> >commenting. First of all no garden NEEDS more clay in it.
>
> That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer than
> the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15 feet.

I'd suspect it wants organic matter than, not clay. Clay is TERRIBLE
stuff to try to garden in unless you like to use explosives.

--
Cheers,
Bev
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"If you see me running, try to keep up."
...Back of bomb technician's shirt

The Real Bev
July 6th 03, 11:46 PM
lpogoda wrote:
>
> Edgar S. wrote in message
> >...
> >"lpogoda" > wrote in message
> >...
> >
> >> As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions advise
> >> against this.
> >
> >It MITE be an idea to learn something about the subject before
> >commenting. First of all no garden NEEDS more clay in it.
>
> That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer than
> the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15 feet.

I'd suspect it wants organic matter than, not clay. Clay is TERRIBLE
stuff to try to garden in unless you like to use explosives.

--
Cheers,
Bev
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"If you see me running, try to keep up."
...Back of bomb technician's shirt

lpogoda
July 7th 03, 01:09 AM
The Real Bev wrote in message >...
>lpogoda wrote:
>>
>> Edgar S. wrote in message
>> >...
>> >"lpogoda" > wrote in message
>> >...
>> >
>> >> As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions advise
>> >> against this.
>> >
>> >It MITE be an idea to learn something about the subject before
>> >commenting. First of all no garden NEEDS more clay in it.
>>
>> That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer
than
>> the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15
feet.
>
>I'd suspect it wants organic matter than, not clay. Clay is TERRIBLE
>stuff to try to garden in unless you like to use explosives.
>
Oh, it want's organic matter as well. Point being that it's SAND, pure and
simple, lacking anything else normally associated with soil. That includes
a judicious admixture of clay.

lpogoda
July 7th 03, 01:09 AM
The Real Bev wrote in message >...
>lpogoda wrote:
>>
>> Edgar S. wrote in message
>> >...
>> >"lpogoda" > wrote in message
>> >...
>> >
>> >> As I said, I don't know why the bag instructions advise
>> >> against this.
>> >
>> >It MITE be an idea to learn something about the subject before
>> >commenting. First of all no garden NEEDS more clay in it.
>>
>> That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer
than
>> the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15
feet.
>
>I'd suspect it wants organic matter than, not clay. Clay is TERRIBLE
>stuff to try to garden in unless you like to use explosives.
>
Oh, it want's organic matter as well. Point being that it's SAND, pure and
simple, lacking anything else normally associated with soil. That includes
a judicious admixture of clay.

kenji
July 7th 03, 03:09 PM
In article >,
Pat Meadows > wrote:

> If I lived there still, and owned not
> rented, I'd get as much organic matter as I could into it.

Cat turds and ****?

e.coli is organic matter too, but I don't think you'd want that in your
garden bed.

kenji
July 7th 03, 03:09 PM
In article >,
Pat Meadows > wrote:

> If I lived there still, and owned not
> rented, I'd get as much organic matter as I could into it.

Cat turds and ****?

e.coli is organic matter too, but I don't think you'd want that in your
garden bed.

Dennis
July 7th 03, 06:53 PM
On 7 Jul 2003 08:03:53 -0700, (Edgar S.) wrote:

>Tell ya what is a gory thot when u sit down to think about it: Water
>in US cities.
>
>First we take a big, greasy dump in our drinking water. This is all
>floated down to the processing plant where they strain out the feces.
>It's then filtered a few times, doused with chemicals to kill the
>taste and prevent you from getting hepatitis. The doo doo water is
>then pumped back to the houses for ppl to drink...again.

It gets even worse! All our drinking water, urban and rural, is
eventually cycled through the ocean, and I don't have to tell you what
fish do there!

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

Dennis
July 7th 03, 06:53 PM
On 7 Jul 2003 08:03:53 -0700, (Edgar S.) wrote:

>Tell ya what is a gory thot when u sit down to think about it: Water
>in US cities.
>
>First we take a big, greasy dump in our drinking water. This is all
>floated down to the processing plant where they strain out the feces.
>It's then filtered a few times, doused with chemicals to kill the
>taste and prevent you from getting hepatitis. The doo doo water is
>then pumped back to the houses for ppl to drink...again.

It gets even worse! All our drinking water, urban and rural, is
eventually cycled through the ocean, and I don't have to tell you what
fish do there!

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

Bob Ward
July 7th 03, 09:53 PM
On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 08:19:42 -0400, Pat Meadows >
wrote:

>On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 17:55:30 -0700, The Real Bev
> wrote:
>
>
>>
>>We live on an alluvial fan with rocks, gravel, sand and silt depending on
>>what part of the yard we dig in. The rocks sense when and where we are
>>going to dig a hole with a post-hole digger and move there before we start
>>the hole. *******s.
>>
>
>It's amazing how they do that, isn't it? Ours do it also.
>
>They're in league with the rain that cleverly rains too fast
>for the intermittent wiper speed and not fast enough for the
>other speeds.
>
>Pat


Have you ever tried "Rain-X"? Works great, so long as you apply it
carefully, and reapply on a regular basis.

Bob Ward
July 7th 03, 09:53 PM
On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 08:19:42 -0400, Pat Meadows >
wrote:

>On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 17:55:30 -0700, The Real Bev
> wrote:
>
>
>>
>>We live on an alluvial fan with rocks, gravel, sand and silt depending on
>>what part of the yard we dig in. The rocks sense when and where we are
>>going to dig a hole with a post-hole digger and move there before we start
>>the hole. *******s.
>>
>
>It's amazing how they do that, isn't it? Ours do it also.
>
>They're in league with the rain that cleverly rains too fast
>for the intermittent wiper speed and not fast enough for the
>other speeds.
>
>Pat


Have you ever tried "Rain-X"? Works great, so long as you apply it
carefully, and reapply on a regular basis.

Bob Ward
July 7th 03, 10:38 PM
On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 16:02:54 -0400, Pat Meadows >
wrote:

>On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 12:53:12 -0700, Bob Ward
> wrote:
>
>>>
>>>It's amazing how they do that, isn't it? Ours do it also.
>>>
>>>They're in league with the rain that cleverly rains too fast
>>>for the intermittent wiper speed and not fast enough for the
>>>other speeds.
>>>
>>>Pat
>>
>>
>>Have you ever tried "Rain-X"? Works great, so long as you apply it
>>carefully, and reapply on a regular basis.
>
>No, never thought of it. Thanks for the tip, we'll look for
>it in the store.
>
>Pat


They also sell additive for the windshield washer that seems to work
pretty well replenishing the application on the windshield. Usually,
I end up driving without using my wipers at all - the airflow pushes
the droplets off the windshield as you drive. It looks like warp
speed on Star Trek when outside light hits the moving drops.

Bob Ward
July 7th 03, 10:38 PM
On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 16:02:54 -0400, Pat Meadows >
wrote:

>On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 12:53:12 -0700, Bob Ward
> wrote:
>
>>>
>>>It's amazing how they do that, isn't it? Ours do it also.
>>>
>>>They're in league with the rain that cleverly rains too fast
>>>for the intermittent wiper speed and not fast enough for the
>>>other speeds.
>>>
>>>Pat
>>
>>
>>Have you ever tried "Rain-X"? Works great, so long as you apply it
>>carefully, and reapply on a regular basis.
>
>No, never thought of it. Thanks for the tip, we'll look for
>it in the store.
>
>Pat


They also sell additive for the windshield washer that seems to work
pretty well replenishing the application on the windshield. Usually,
I end up driving without using my wipers at all - the airflow pushes
the droplets off the windshield as you drive. It looks like warp
speed on Star Trek when outside light hits the moving drops.

lpogoda
July 8th 03, 02:33 AM
The Real Bev wrote in message >...
>lpogoda wrote:
>>
>> The Real Bev wrote in message >...
>> >lpogoda wrote:
>> >> That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer
than
>> >> the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15
feet.
>> >
>> >I'd suspect it wants organic matter than, not clay. Clay is TERRIBLE
>> >stuff to try to garden in unless you like to use explosives.
>> >
>> Oh, it want's organic matter as well. Point being that it's SAND, pure
and
>> simple, lacking anything else normally associated with soil. That
includes
>> a judicious admixture of clay.
>
>OK, as long as it's judicious. I seem to remember hearing that carrots
>like to grow in sand.
>
>We live on an alluvial fan with rocks, gravel, sand and silt depending on
>what part of the yard we dig in. The rocks sense when and where we are
>going to dig a hole with a post-hole digger and move there before we start
>the hole. *******s.
>


Just the opposite of digging for clams. Not a problem here. I finally gave
up trying to grow stuff a few years ago and put in a pool. They dug a
pretty big hole. All sand. Maybe I should have started making glass.

lpogoda
July 8th 03, 02:33 AM
The Real Bev wrote in message >...
>lpogoda wrote:
>>
>> The Real Bev wrote in message >...
>> >lpogoda wrote:
>> >> That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer
than
>> >> the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15
feet.
>> >
>> >I'd suspect it wants organic matter than, not clay. Clay is TERRIBLE
>> >stuff to try to garden in unless you like to use explosives.
>> >
>> Oh, it want's organic matter as well. Point being that it's SAND, pure
and
>> simple, lacking anything else normally associated with soil. That
includes
>> a judicious admixture of clay.
>
>OK, as long as it's judicious. I seem to remember hearing that carrots
>like to grow in sand.
>
>We live on an alluvial fan with rocks, gravel, sand and silt depending on
>what part of the yard we dig in. The rocks sense when and where we are
>going to dig a hole with a post-hole digger and move there before we start
>the hole. *******s.
>


Just the opposite of digging for clams. Not a problem here. I finally gave
up trying to grow stuff a few years ago and put in a pool. They dug a
pretty big hole. All sand. Maybe I should have started making glass.

lpogoda
July 8th 03, 02:34 AM
Pat Meadows wrote in message >...
>On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 17:55:30 -0700, The Real Bev
> wrote:
>
>
>>
>>We live on an alluvial fan with rocks, gravel, sand and silt depending on
>>what part of the yard we dig in. The rocks sense when and where we are
>>going to dig a hole with a post-hole digger and move there before we start
>>the hole. *******s.
>>
>
>It's amazing how they do that, isn't it? Ours do it also.
>
>They're in league with the rain that cleverly rains too fast
>for the intermittent wiper speed and not fast enough for the
>other speeds.
>
Aided and abetted by the wiper on the driver's side. It always wears out
sooner than the one on the passenger side, probably because the driver's
side gets used more.

lpogoda
July 8th 03, 02:34 AM
Pat Meadows wrote in message >...
>On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 17:55:30 -0700, The Real Bev
> wrote:
>
>
>>
>>We live on an alluvial fan with rocks, gravel, sand and silt depending on
>>what part of the yard we dig in. The rocks sense when and where we are
>>going to dig a hole with a post-hole digger and move there before we start
>>the hole. *******s.
>>
>
>It's amazing how they do that, isn't it? Ours do it also.
>
>They're in league with the rain that cleverly rains too fast
>for the intermittent wiper speed and not fast enough for the
>other speeds.
>
Aided and abetted by the wiper on the driver's side. It always wears out
sooner than the one on the passenger side, probably because the driver's
side gets used more.

lpogoda
July 8th 03, 02:36 AM
Pat Meadows wrote in message ...
>On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 14:46:31 -0700, The Real Bev
> wrote:
>
>>> That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer
than
>>> the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15
feet.
>>
>>I'd suspect it wants organic matter than, not clay. Clay is TERRIBLE
>>stuff to try to garden in unless you like to use explosives.
>
>So far as I can see (experience, plus what I've read), it
>doesn't matter *what* the soil problem is: the answer is
>always more organic matter. I think this is really true.
>
>We have 100% heavy clay, it's terrible. We have just a
>little bit of topsoil, then about 6" down it's all heavy,
>gray, slippery clay laced with rocks.
>
>This is one of the reasons we've elected to use raised beds.
>We're importing 100% of the stuff in the raised beds - which
>are filled with the spent-mushroom-soil that (thank
>goodness) we can buy economically here.
>
>I remember the sand in South Jersey though: we lived in an
>apartment there, but I was able to grow flowers, tomatoes
>and basil in front of the apartment. Just pure sand.
>
>WHOOSH - whatever water or plant food you put in it was gone
>almost instantly. If I lived there still, and owned not
>rented, I'd get as much organic matter as I could into it.
>
It's like trying to fill a sieve. To grow anything means growing
hydroponically.

lpogoda
July 8th 03, 02:36 AM
Pat Meadows wrote in message ...
>On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 14:46:31 -0700, The Real Bev
> wrote:
>
>>> That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer
than
>>> the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15
feet.
>>
>>I'd suspect it wants organic matter than, not clay. Clay is TERRIBLE
>>stuff to try to garden in unless you like to use explosives.
>
>So far as I can see (experience, plus what I've read), it
>doesn't matter *what* the soil problem is: the answer is
>always more organic matter. I think this is really true.
>
>We have 100% heavy clay, it's terrible. We have just a
>little bit of topsoil, then about 6" down it's all heavy,
>gray, slippery clay laced with rocks.
>
>This is one of the reasons we've elected to use raised beds.
>We're importing 100% of the stuff in the raised beds - which
>are filled with the spent-mushroom-soil that (thank
>goodness) we can buy economically here.
>
>I remember the sand in South Jersey though: we lived in an
>apartment there, but I was able to grow flowers, tomatoes
>and basil in front of the apartment. Just pure sand.
>
>WHOOSH - whatever water or plant food you put in it was gone
>almost instantly. If I lived there still, and owned not
>rented, I'd get as much organic matter as I could into it.
>
It's like trying to fill a sieve. To grow anything means growing
hydroponically.

Edgar S.
July 8th 03, 07:01 PM
"lpogoda" > wrote in message >...
> Pat Meadows wrote in message ...
> >On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 14:46:31 -0700, The Real Bev
> > wrote:
> >
> >>> That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer
> than
> >>> the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15
> feet.
> >>
> >>I'd suspect it wants organic matter than, not clay. Clay is TERRIBLE
> >>stuff to try to garden in unless you like to use explosives.
> >
> >So far as I can see (experience, plus what I've read), it
> >doesn't matter *what* the soil problem is: the answer is
> >always more organic matter. I think this is really true.

Yes. Plants live in topsoil which is generally about 50% humis or
organic material. The other half of topsoil is sand, minerals and
other inorganics.


> >
> >We have 100% heavy clay, it's terrible. We have just a
> >little bit of topsoil, then about 6" down it's all heavy,
> >gray, slippery clay laced with rocks.
> >
> >This is one of the reasons we've elected to use raised beds.
> >We're importing 100% of the stuff in the raised beds - which
> >are filled with the spent-mushroom-soil that (thank
> >goodness) we can buy economically here.

mushroom soil is composted horse manure. Should make a very suitable
topsoil. I was just going to suggest raised beds for those in areas
with too much clay or sand in their topsoil.

Edgar S.
July 8th 03, 07:01 PM
"lpogoda" > wrote in message >...
> Pat Meadows wrote in message ...
> >On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 14:46:31 -0700, The Real Bev
> > wrote:
> >
> >>> That's fallacious, here in South Jersey. My area is pure sand, nicer
> than
> >>> the stuff you find on most beaches, to the depth of at least 10 or 15
> feet.
> >>
> >>I'd suspect it wants organic matter than, not clay. Clay is TERRIBLE
> >>stuff to try to garden in unless you like to use explosives.
> >
> >So far as I can see (experience, plus what I've read), it
> >doesn't matter *what* the soil problem is: the answer is
> >always more organic matter. I think this is really true.

Yes. Plants live in topsoil which is generally about 50% humis or
organic material. The other half of topsoil is sand, minerals and
other inorganics.


> >
> >We have 100% heavy clay, it's terrible. We have just a
> >little bit of topsoil, then about 6" down it's all heavy,
> >gray, slippery clay laced with rocks.
> >
> >This is one of the reasons we've elected to use raised beds.
> >We're importing 100% of the stuff in the raised beds - which
> >are filled with the spent-mushroom-soil that (thank
> >goodness) we can buy economically here.

mushroom soil is composted horse manure. Should make a very suitable
topsoil. I was just going to suggest raised beds for those in areas
with too much clay or sand in their topsoil.

Edgar S.
July 8th 03, 08:51 PM
Dennis > wrote in message >...
> On 7 Jul 2003 08:03:53 -0700, (Edgar S.) wrote:

> It gets even worse! All our drinking water, urban and rural, is
> eventually cycled through the ocean, and I don't have to tell you what
> fish do there!


:) ok. Limitting ourselves to the scope of THIS newsgroup. Crapping
in the drinking water is NOT the most frugal way to approach
maintaining a good fresh water supply.

Ya..we CAN and do pump it endlessly in the cycle of contamination,
filtering and dousing with chemicals at considerable cost. It's a
process that happens ALL by itself.

There are more economical AND better ecological ways to do things. My
interests center around finding, inventing and rediscovering better
economies.

Edgar S.
July 8th 03, 08:51 PM
Dennis > wrote in message >...
> On 7 Jul 2003 08:03:53 -0700, (Edgar S.) wrote:

> It gets even worse! All our drinking water, urban and rural, is
> eventually cycled through the ocean, and I don't have to tell you what
> fish do there!


:) ok. Limitting ourselves to the scope of THIS newsgroup. Crapping
in the drinking water is NOT the most frugal way to approach
maintaining a good fresh water supply.

Ya..we CAN and do pump it endlessly in the cycle of contamination,
filtering and dousing with chemicals at considerable cost. It's a
process that happens ALL by itself.

There are more economical AND better ecological ways to do things. My
interests center around finding, inventing and rediscovering better
economies.

Mogie
July 8th 03, 09:05 PM
Recently attended a composting workshop put on by our local extension
service. I asked this very question about cat litter in the compost pile and
the answer is both yes and no.

No don't add it if the compost is to be used on any type of food garden.

Yes if it's just to shrubs, etc.




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Mogie
July 8th 03, 09:05 PM
Recently attended a composting workshop put on by our local extension
service. I asked this very question about cat litter in the compost pile and
the answer is both yes and no.

No don't add it if the compost is to be used on any type of food garden.

Yes if it's just to shrubs, etc.




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linda-renee
July 8th 03, 11:02 PM
"Bob Ward" > wrote in message

> Have you ever tried "Rain-X"? Works great, so long as you apply it
> carefully, and reapply on a regular basis.

I asked a mechanic about Rain-X. He said using car polish on the windshield
would work just as well. I haven't tried either yet.

linda-renee
July 8th 03, 11:02 PM
"Bob Ward" > wrote in message

> Have you ever tried "Rain-X"? Works great, so long as you apply it
> carefully, and reapply on a regular basis.

I asked a mechanic about Rain-X. He said using car polish on the windshield
would work just as well. I haven't tried either yet.

July 10th 03, 03:56 AM
I wouldn't . . . at least, I wouldn't make a practice of it, primarily
because kitty litter is (usually) ground up dried up clay, and an
accumulation of it will change your beautiful sandy loam that your plants
all know and love, to a pasty mass of blech that will be the bane of the
vegetable kingdom, and make you ashamed to show your face in your
neighborhood.
I had a yard chuck full of clay, and it was awful. Sticky, messy, ugh.
Anyway, I wouldn't advise it . . .

July 10th 03, 03:56 AM
I wouldn't . . . at least, I wouldn't make a practice of it, primarily
because kitty litter is (usually) ground up dried up clay, and an
accumulation of it will change your beautiful sandy loam that your plants
all know and love, to a pasty mass of blech that will be the bane of the
vegetable kingdom, and make you ashamed to show your face in your
neighborhood.
I had a yard chuck full of clay, and it was awful. Sticky, messy, ugh.
Anyway, I wouldn't advise it . . .

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