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Bubbalicious
July 6th 03, 03:48 AM
(Katherine) wrote:

>Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
>spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
>simply go crazy with the credit cards!

This has NOTHING to do with spending. Buying "things" never will replace
affection. Some people eat Twinkies........pie, brownies..... Helpful
advice sometimes can be very blunt.

Why is your husband out of town.............. (is he having fun?) I would
be looking for professional help.

JoelnCaryn
July 6th 03, 03:56 AM
>Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
>spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
>simply go crazy with the credit cards!

<snip>

If you'll reread your original post, it will probably be obvious that you are
making excuses to yourself for your spending. The second line (available
above) basically indicates to me that it's easier for you to make excuses to
yourself than to your husband.

If I were you, I wouldn't go shopping with my credit cards. Ever. I'd put
them somewhere not easily accessible (like frozen in a chunk of ice in the
freezer) in case of emergencies (by which I mean something like a medical
emergency or a death in the family). You need develop the ability to be
accountable to yourself, which will probably be easier on a cash-only budget.

JoelnCaryn
July 6th 03, 03:56 AM
>Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
>spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
>simply go crazy with the credit cards!

<snip>

If you'll reread your original post, it will probably be obvious that you are
making excuses to yourself for your spending. The second line (available
above) basically indicates to me that it's easier for you to make excuses to
yourself than to your husband.

If I were you, I wouldn't go shopping with my credit cards. Ever. I'd put
them somewhere not easily accessible (like frozen in a chunk of ice in the
freezer) in case of emergencies (by which I mean something like a medical
emergency or a death in the family). You need develop the ability to be
accountable to yourself, which will probably be easier on a cash-only budget.

Sue
July 6th 03, 04:42 AM
>From: Katherine

>Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
>spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
>simply go crazy with the credit cards!

I've run into a lot of people who impulse shop... particularly
if they've discovered a new hobby that they're excited about.
They rush out and buy everything related to it at once... then
the excitement is over and everything winds up as clutter
in their homes, basements, and garages until the day that they
decide to either have a yard sale or donate it.

I've gone to yard sales that are real heavy on certain items, and
you can almost do a forensic analysis about all the things that
"interested" the seller at one time or another.

I'm a hobbiest myself - and there are several products that
I use often - but I *ALSO* recognize that I only have a certain
amount of time and money to do certain things.

It's important to recognize that there ARE limits...
I time things to see how long it takes for me to use them
before I need more. For example, I *really* like the Principal
Secret products. After the sample box arrived, I carefully
reviewed which of the products I'd use daily or weekly, and
how long it would take me to go through a full shipment.
I then called them to have my boxes modified, choosing
four products instead of all six, and at a
slower delivery
rate (every five months instead of every three). I get only
what I want and need, which is a savings.

I also don't go hog wild when things are on sale just because
I use "whatever" it is. I don't stock up too much on stuff because,
by the time I *do* finally go through whatever it is, there's
usually another sale *somewhere.*

I'm very fortunate that I'm not much of an impulse shopper,
but when I *do* get an urge, I remind myself that "you
can't have everything because there's no place to put it."

Hope that helps.

Purrrz,

Sue

Sue
July 6th 03, 04:42 AM
>From: Katherine

>Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
>spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
>simply go crazy with the credit cards!

I've run into a lot of people who impulse shop... particularly
if they've discovered a new hobby that they're excited about.
They rush out and buy everything related to it at once... then
the excitement is over and everything winds up as clutter
in their homes, basements, and garages until the day that they
decide to either have a yard sale or donate it.

I've gone to yard sales that are real heavy on certain items, and
you can almost do a forensic analysis about all the things that
"interested" the seller at one time or another.

I'm a hobbiest myself - and there are several products that
I use often - but I *ALSO* recognize that I only have a certain
amount of time and money to do certain things.

It's important to recognize that there ARE limits...
I time things to see how long it takes for me to use them
before I need more. For example, I *really* like the Principal
Secret products. After the sample box arrived, I carefully
reviewed which of the products I'd use daily or weekly, and
how long it would take me to go through a full shipment.
I then called them to have my boxes modified, choosing
four products instead of all six, and at a
slower delivery
rate (every five months instead of every three). I get only
what I want and need, which is a savings.

I also don't go hog wild when things are on sale just because
I use "whatever" it is. I don't stock up too much on stuff because,
by the time I *do* finally go through whatever it is, there's
usually another sale *somewhere.*

I'm very fortunate that I'm not much of an impulse shopper,
but when I *do* get an urge, I remind myself that "you
can't have everything because there's no place to put it."

Hope that helps.

Purrrz,

Sue

spncity
July 6th 03, 04:58 AM
Never charge anything to a credit card that you can't pay off fully at the
end of the month when the bill comes.

Check out the book "The Pathway" by Laurel Mellin. She shows how to build
the skills to give yourself both nurturing and limits so that you are not
using external solutions (like overspending) to feel okay, to feel less
lonely, to get even with your husband for being gone, or to get a high.

Consider a volunteer activity for the times when your husband is out of
town. There are lots of nursing homes that would love to have someone with
your energy. You could do the flower beds at a nursing home. If you work
it out ahead of time, they will reimburse for materials and you get the
pleasure of gardening. Or, consider other activities. You can read
stories to groups or individuals, or just sit with someone and hold a hand,
or paint her nails. If you prefer a different age group, volunteer with
children or teens.

For skin, make sure you are drinking 70 to 100 ounces of water a day. Study
up on essential oils in the diet.

Good luck!

spncity

"Katherine" > wrote in message
m...
> Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
> spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
> simply go crazy with the credit cards! This year its been especially
> bad because I've taken up gardening and I (although I do only buy
> things generally on sale, but still!) bought everything - pots, soil,
> mushroom manure, watering cans, shrubs, perennials, fertilizer etc.
> etc.
>
> I have a small yard (very small, 11' wide by 34' deep) because I'm in
> a ground floor condo, but I have a small worm composter so hopefully I
> can condition my soil somewhat for next season so I won't have to buy
> mushroom manure. And I started my veggies from seeds so that helped a
> bit.
>
> Anyways, some of my impulse buying has been expensive facial
> cleansers, etc. (Dermalogica) because I had severely dehyrdated skin
> and thankfully the expensive stuff has helped my skin, but not my
> credit card! And some clothing, although I do shop at consignment
> stores I tend to purchase more clothes than I really need.
>
> We are doing OK right now, $3500 in debt on my card, which I know is
> too much, but still not THAT bad either. My fear is that it will get
> worse. We are trying to pay off our credit cards and save for a house
> so this certainly isn't helping!
>
> My husband keeps track of our spending in a ledger book, but when he's
> out of town I guess he's not there reminding me what I've spent and so
> I just continue to spend spend spend!
>
> Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
> facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
> a few others that simply don't work for me.
>
> Thanks so much!
> Katherine

spncity
July 6th 03, 04:58 AM
Never charge anything to a credit card that you can't pay off fully at the
end of the month when the bill comes.

Check out the book "The Pathway" by Laurel Mellin. She shows how to build
the skills to give yourself both nurturing and limits so that you are not
using external solutions (like overspending) to feel okay, to feel less
lonely, to get even with your husband for being gone, or to get a high.

Consider a volunteer activity for the times when your husband is out of
town. There are lots of nursing homes that would love to have someone with
your energy. You could do the flower beds at a nursing home. If you work
it out ahead of time, they will reimburse for materials and you get the
pleasure of gardening. Or, consider other activities. You can read
stories to groups or individuals, or just sit with someone and hold a hand,
or paint her nails. If you prefer a different age group, volunteer with
children or teens.

For skin, make sure you are drinking 70 to 100 ounces of water a day. Study
up on essential oils in the diet.

Good luck!

spncity

"Katherine" > wrote in message
m...
> Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
> spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
> simply go crazy with the credit cards! This year its been especially
> bad because I've taken up gardening and I (although I do only buy
> things generally on sale, but still!) bought everything - pots, soil,
> mushroom manure, watering cans, shrubs, perennials, fertilizer etc.
> etc.
>
> I have a small yard (very small, 11' wide by 34' deep) because I'm in
> a ground floor condo, but I have a small worm composter so hopefully I
> can condition my soil somewhat for next season so I won't have to buy
> mushroom manure. And I started my veggies from seeds so that helped a
> bit.
>
> Anyways, some of my impulse buying has been expensive facial
> cleansers, etc. (Dermalogica) because I had severely dehyrdated skin
> and thankfully the expensive stuff has helped my skin, but not my
> credit card! And some clothing, although I do shop at consignment
> stores I tend to purchase more clothes than I really need.
>
> We are doing OK right now, $3500 in debt on my card, which I know is
> too much, but still not THAT bad either. My fear is that it will get
> worse. We are trying to pay off our credit cards and save for a house
> so this certainly isn't helping!
>
> My husband keeps track of our spending in a ledger book, but when he's
> out of town I guess he's not there reminding me what I've spent and so
> I just continue to spend spend spend!
>
> Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
> facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
> a few others that simply don't work for me.
>
> Thanks so much!
> Katherine

SoCalMike
July 6th 03, 07:04 AM
>
> Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
> facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
> a few others that simply don't work for me.

when the hubby's out, find a boyfriend. thatll curb your spending since
youll be in bed the whole time. and the facial moisturizer will come on its
own. for free.

SoCalMike
July 6th 03, 07:04 AM
>
> Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
> facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
> a few others that simply don't work for me.

when the hubby's out, find a boyfriend. thatll curb your spending since
youll be in bed the whole time. and the facial moisturizer will come on its
own. for free.

Katherine
July 6th 03, 07:27 AM
Thanks Everyone... Sue and Spncity you both hit the nail on the head.
My husband is out of town about twice a year for keeping up on the
latest and greatest in the world of electrical engineering. This time
he was away for six weeks. He calls daily and messages me on my cell
phone and via email throughout the day but still not the same as being
here in person!

I work in police services as a dispatcher, and I also have a part time
job in a library which keeps me busy two saturdays a month. So
between the two of us, the money coming in is reasonable, and we pay
whats due on the statements off every month so the interest isn't an
issue, although it could be if my impulse spending gets any worse. We
also charge a few of our bills to our credit card for the points, but
we only started that as we had been good at paying the card off every
month.

I'm definately one of those who finds a new hobby and goes hog wild,
at least I have with the gardening thing. I love how my little yard
looks, I've put a lot of hard work (and money) into it. One big
purchase was a gate-leg folding wood table and two chairs, which look
great but cost a bundle! I picked an umbrella out of our buildings
dumpter however as someone had thrown it out and it was in fine
condition. Thats one good thing I do is if someone throws something
out and I can genuinely use it, I have no problems taking it back out
of the dumpster.

The library I work at is at a school that teaches everything from
trades (welding, joinery etc.) to computing classes and interior
design, etc. etc... a real mish mash of things. I take my courses for
free so I have taken welding and interior design just for interest and
also to make my own garden art :) Its been a blast. But I take
serious classes as well, I'm finishing up a certificate in computer
networking early next year.

The things I spend money on regularly are a bit much, buying a muffin
every day at work, and I was buying lunch almost every day for a while
and that really added up. I've cut back on that and started a coffee
fund at work so staff only pay 25 cents a cup, not bad. I still buy
muffins so maybe I should buy them at the bakery which is much
cheaper.

I'm going to read "The Pathway" (thanks spncity) - and I work in a
library so I will take it out from there instead of buying it :)

And the water, I drink about a litre a day, but perhaps I need more.
I'll start drinking 1.5 litres and see how it goes.

Loneliness is definately a part of it, I'm busy with a fulltime job,
parttime job AND I go to school parttime... but other than work I
don't get out much when hubby isn't here. So I'll have to start
finding cheap things to go out and do (my coworkers invite me out
often, but it seems its always to $75 bbq's and really expensive
things, ugh!).

Thanks :)

Katherine

Katherine
July 6th 03, 07:27 AM
Thanks Everyone... Sue and Spncity you both hit the nail on the head.
My husband is out of town about twice a year for keeping up on the
latest and greatest in the world of electrical engineering. This time
he was away for six weeks. He calls daily and messages me on my cell
phone and via email throughout the day but still not the same as being
here in person!

I work in police services as a dispatcher, and I also have a part time
job in a library which keeps me busy two saturdays a month. So
between the two of us, the money coming in is reasonable, and we pay
whats due on the statements off every month so the interest isn't an
issue, although it could be if my impulse spending gets any worse. We
also charge a few of our bills to our credit card for the points, but
we only started that as we had been good at paying the card off every
month.

I'm definately one of those who finds a new hobby and goes hog wild,
at least I have with the gardening thing. I love how my little yard
looks, I've put a lot of hard work (and money) into it. One big
purchase was a gate-leg folding wood table and two chairs, which look
great but cost a bundle! I picked an umbrella out of our buildings
dumpter however as someone had thrown it out and it was in fine
condition. Thats one good thing I do is if someone throws something
out and I can genuinely use it, I have no problems taking it back out
of the dumpster.

The library I work at is at a school that teaches everything from
trades (welding, joinery etc.) to computing classes and interior
design, etc. etc... a real mish mash of things. I take my courses for
free so I have taken welding and interior design just for interest and
also to make my own garden art :) Its been a blast. But I take
serious classes as well, I'm finishing up a certificate in computer
networking early next year.

The things I spend money on regularly are a bit much, buying a muffin
every day at work, and I was buying lunch almost every day for a while
and that really added up. I've cut back on that and started a coffee
fund at work so staff only pay 25 cents a cup, not bad. I still buy
muffins so maybe I should buy them at the bakery which is much
cheaper.

I'm going to read "The Pathway" (thanks spncity) - and I work in a
library so I will take it out from there instead of buying it :)

And the water, I drink about a litre a day, but perhaps I need more.
I'll start drinking 1.5 litres and see how it goes.

Loneliness is definately a part of it, I'm busy with a fulltime job,
parttime job AND I go to school parttime... but other than work I
don't get out much when hubby isn't here. So I'll have to start
finding cheap things to go out and do (my coworkers invite me out
often, but it seems its always to $75 bbq's and really expensive
things, ugh!).

Thanks :)

Katherine

silvasurfa
July 6th 03, 11:16 AM
"Katherine" > wrote in message
m...

> Anyways, some of my impulse buying has been expensive facial
> cleansers, etc. (Dermalogica) because I had severely dehyrdated skin
> and thankfully the expensive stuff has helped my skin, but not my
> credit card!

Get a library card, borrow and read "Don't go to the Cosmetics Counter
Without Me"


And some clothing, although I do shop at consignment
> stores I tend to purchase more clothes than I really need.

If they are open when you are off work, go to thrift shops for a bit of
recreational shopping. It is a lot more difficult to overspend there, and
the shopping entertainment per dollar spent is greater. Also, you can keep
an eye out for buying other stuff you need more cheaply.

>
> We are doing OK right now, $3500 in debt on my card, which I know is
> too much, but still not THAT bad either. My fear is that it will get
> worse. We are trying to pay off our credit cards and save for a house
> so this certainly isn't helping!
>
> My husband keeps track of our spending in a ledger book, but when he's
> out of town I guess he's not there reminding me what I've spent and so
> I just continue to spend spend spend!
>
> Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
> facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
> a few others that simply don't work for me.

Read "Don't go to the Cosmetics Counter Without Me". There are some pretty
good cheap products but you will need to become educated to chose them. For
example, Cetaphil lotion is a favourite inexpensive cleanser for those with
dry and sensitive skin. Also, ask on alt.fashion... although you may not
want to hang out there too much until you grow more self control... they
tend to egg each other on re spending.

>
> Thanks so much!
> Katherine

silvasurfa
July 6th 03, 11:16 AM
"Katherine" > wrote in message
m...

> Anyways, some of my impulse buying has been expensive facial
> cleansers, etc. (Dermalogica) because I had severely dehyrdated skin
> and thankfully the expensive stuff has helped my skin, but not my
> credit card!

Get a library card, borrow and read "Don't go to the Cosmetics Counter
Without Me"


And some clothing, although I do shop at consignment
> stores I tend to purchase more clothes than I really need.

If they are open when you are off work, go to thrift shops for a bit of
recreational shopping. It is a lot more difficult to overspend there, and
the shopping entertainment per dollar spent is greater. Also, you can keep
an eye out for buying other stuff you need more cheaply.

>
> We are doing OK right now, $3500 in debt on my card, which I know is
> too much, but still not THAT bad either. My fear is that it will get
> worse. We are trying to pay off our credit cards and save for a house
> so this certainly isn't helping!
>
> My husband keeps track of our spending in a ledger book, but when he's
> out of town I guess he's not there reminding me what I've spent and so
> I just continue to spend spend spend!
>
> Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
> facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
> a few others that simply don't work for me.

Read "Don't go to the Cosmetics Counter Without Me". There are some pretty
good cheap products but you will need to become educated to chose them. For
example, Cetaphil lotion is a favourite inexpensive cleanser for those with
dry and sensitive skin. Also, ask on alt.fashion... although you may not
want to hang out there too much until you grow more self control... they
tend to egg each other on re spending.

>
> Thanks so much!
> Katherine

Chloe
July 6th 03, 12:34 PM
"Sue" > wrote in message
...
> >From: Katherine
><snip>
> I'm very fortunate that I'm not much of an impulse shopper,
> but when I *do* get an urge, I remind myself that "you
> can't have everything because there's no place to put it."

In the case of the OP I think there's also the issue of "you can't have that
because you don't have the money to buy it."

Chloe
July 6th 03, 12:34 PM
"Sue" > wrote in message
...
> >From: Katherine
><snip>
> I'm very fortunate that I'm not much of an impulse shopper,
> but when I *do* get an urge, I remind myself that "you
> can't have everything because there's no place to put it."

In the case of the OP I think there's also the issue of "you can't have that
because you don't have the money to buy it."

July 6th 03, 01:46 PM
(Katherine) wrote:

> I've cut back on that and started a coffee
>fund at work so staff only pay 25 cents a cup, not bad. I still buy
>muffins so maybe I should buy them at the bakery which is much
>cheaper.

If there is a day old bakery store, they will be cheaper yet.

If you feel the need to buy stuff, go to a dollar store. When you go to shop
for gardening stuff, set a budget and stick to a list of items.

I've never been to a $75 BBQ and had no idea such things existed. The best BBQ
shacks I've been to are cheap hole-in-the-walls with lines a minimum of twenty
people deep.

July 6th 03, 01:46 PM
(Katherine) wrote:

> I've cut back on that and started a coffee
>fund at work so staff only pay 25 cents a cup, not bad. I still buy
>muffins so maybe I should buy them at the bakery which is much
>cheaper.

If there is a day old bakery store, they will be cheaper yet.

If you feel the need to buy stuff, go to a dollar store. When you go to shop
for gardening stuff, set a budget and stick to a list of items.

I've never been to a $75 BBQ and had no idea such things existed. The best BBQ
shacks I've been to are cheap hole-in-the-walls with lines a minimum of twenty
people deep.

dogsnus
July 6th 03, 03:11 PM
wrote in :


snip
The
> best BBQ shacks I've been to are cheap hole-in-the-walls with lines a
> minimum of twenty people deep.

Ah. I'd no idea you'd been to Eagle, Idaho's Rocky Mountain Oyster-Fest!

Terri

dogsnus
July 6th 03, 03:11 PM
wrote in :


snip
The
> best BBQ shacks I've been to are cheap hole-in-the-walls with lines a
> minimum of twenty people deep.

Ah. I'd no idea you'd been to Eagle, Idaho's Rocky Mountain Oyster-Fest!

Terri

July 6th 03, 05:20 PM
>I still buy muffins so maybe I should buy
> them at the bakery which is much
> cheaper.

Muffins are *very* easy to make from scratch. I bake a dozen and freeze
them in a gallon-size ziploc bag. You could freeze them in smaller bags
in single servings (1 or 2 muffins) so you could easily grab one and
toss it in your bag on your way out the door to work. By the time you
get there, they should be defrosted.

Here's a simple, versatile muffin recipe (simplified version of the
Tightwad Gazette "univesal muffin" recipe):

2 cups flour
1/2 cup sugar (white or brown)
1 tbsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
Appropriate spices
1 cup milk
I egg
2-4 tbsp. oil
(optional) 1 cup pumpkin, applesauce, mashed banana, etc.
(optional) Handful of additions - chopped nuts, raisins or other dried
fruit, chocolate chips, etc.

Stir together dry ingredients. Add wet ingredients and additions, stir
just until mixed. Spoon into oiled or paper lined muffin tins, bake at
400 degrees for 20 minutes. Makes 12 muffins.

If you leave out the pumpkin/applesauce, you'll want to add somethng
else to add flavor. I made lemon muffins this morning with some candied
lemon peel I had left over when I made lemonade syrup (I'd frozen the
peels to use later). Some other good variations are applesauce with
raisins; banana or pumpkin with walnuts; and cranberries, walnuts and
lemon yogurt** Add whatever spices go well with your main ingredients.

You could make a batch on the weekend, and be set for the whole week.
It really isn't difficult at all, honest! :)

Hope this helps,
Diva

** If you use yogurt or buttermilk in your muffins, reduce baking powder
to 1 tsp. and add 1/2 tsp. baking soda

July 6th 03, 05:20 PM
>I still buy muffins so maybe I should buy
> them at the bakery which is much
> cheaper.

Muffins are *very* easy to make from scratch. I bake a dozen and freeze
them in a gallon-size ziploc bag. You could freeze them in smaller bags
in single servings (1 or 2 muffins) so you could easily grab one and
toss it in your bag on your way out the door to work. By the time you
get there, they should be defrosted.

Here's a simple, versatile muffin recipe (simplified version of the
Tightwad Gazette "univesal muffin" recipe):

2 cups flour
1/2 cup sugar (white or brown)
1 tbsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
Appropriate spices
1 cup milk
I egg
2-4 tbsp. oil
(optional) 1 cup pumpkin, applesauce, mashed banana, etc.
(optional) Handful of additions - chopped nuts, raisins or other dried
fruit, chocolate chips, etc.

Stir together dry ingredients. Add wet ingredients and additions, stir
just until mixed. Spoon into oiled or paper lined muffin tins, bake at
400 degrees for 20 minutes. Makes 12 muffins.

If you leave out the pumpkin/applesauce, you'll want to add somethng
else to add flavor. I made lemon muffins this morning with some candied
lemon peel I had left over when I made lemonade syrup (I'd frozen the
peels to use later). Some other good variations are applesauce with
raisins; banana or pumpkin with walnuts; and cranberries, walnuts and
lemon yogurt** Add whatever spices go well with your main ingredients.

You could make a batch on the weekend, and be set for the whole week.
It really isn't difficult at all, honest! :)

Hope this helps,
Diva

** If you use yogurt or buttermilk in your muffins, reduce baking powder
to 1 tsp. and add 1/2 tsp. baking soda

Tsu Dho Poster
July 6th 03, 07:51 PM
"Katherine" > wrote in message news:fd3

> Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
> spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
> simply go crazy with the credit cards!

Sounds like, (emotionally) you're too young to have a c-card. You still need
adult supervision.
Cut up the cards, learn to save for whatever you want.

> Anyways, some of my impulse buying has been expensive facial
> cleansers, etc. (Dermalogica) because I had severely dehyrdated skin

more water and/or less coffee.

> My fear is that it will get worse. We are trying to pay off our credit
cards and save for a house
> so this certainly isn't helping!

No need to "fear". It can't get worse on it's own.
The holder of the card has some control over what the balance is, so I've
heard.
>
> My husband keeps track of our spending in a ledger book, but when he's
> out of town I guess he's not there reminding me what I've spent and so
> I just continue to spend spend spend!

The problem with overspending is.....the consequences are almost
benign.....just a bunch of larger numbers on the bill...<yawn>

> Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
> facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
> a few others that simply don't work for me.
>

There's lots of recipes using "natural" products on those vegan sites.
ps: avoid those esterified Vitamin E products (succinate, acetate). They're
inactive forms of E, unless ingested. Ripoff!

Tsu Dho Poster
July 6th 03, 07:51 PM
"Katherine" > wrote in message news:fd3

> Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
> spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
> simply go crazy with the credit cards!

Sounds like, (emotionally) you're too young to have a c-card. You still need
adult supervision.
Cut up the cards, learn to save for whatever you want.

> Anyways, some of my impulse buying has been expensive facial
> cleansers, etc. (Dermalogica) because I had severely dehyrdated skin

more water and/or less coffee.

> My fear is that it will get worse. We are trying to pay off our credit
cards and save for a house
> so this certainly isn't helping!

No need to "fear". It can't get worse on it's own.
The holder of the card has some control over what the balance is, so I've
heard.
>
> My husband keeps track of our spending in a ledger book, but when he's
> out of town I guess he's not there reminding me what I've spent and so
> I just continue to spend spend spend!

The problem with overspending is.....the consequences are almost
benign.....just a bunch of larger numbers on the bill...<yawn>

> Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
> facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
> a few others that simply don't work for me.
>

There's lots of recipes using "natural" products on those vegan sites.
ps: avoid those esterified Vitamin E products (succinate, acetate). They're
inactive forms of E, unless ingested. Ripoff!

Halcitron
July 6th 03, 09:08 PM
>From: (Katherine)
>Newsgroups: misc.consumers.frugal-living
>Date: 5 Jul 2003 18:09:42 -0700

>
>Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
>spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
>simply go crazy with the credit cards! This year its been especially
>bad because I've taken up gardening and I (although I do only buy
>things generally on sale, but still!) bought everything - pots, soil,
>mushroom manure, watering cans, shrubs, perennials, fertilizer etc.
>etc.
>
>I have a small yard (very small, 11' wide by 34' deep) because I'm in
>a ground floor condo, but I have a small worm composter so hopefully I
>can condition my soil somewhat for next season so I won't have to buy
>mushroom manure. And I started my veggies from seeds so that helped a
>bit.
>
>Anyways, some of my impulse buying has been expensive facial
>cleansers, etc. (Dermalogica) because I had severely dehyrdated skin
>and thankfully the expensive stuff has helped my skin, but not my
>credit card! And some clothing, although I do shop at consignment
>stores I tend to purchase more clothes than I really need.
>
>We are doing OK right now, $3500 in debt on my card, which I know is
>too much, but still not THAT bad either. My fear is that it will get
>worse. We are trying to pay off our credit cards and save for a house
>so this certainly isn't helping!
>
>My husband keeps track of our spending in a ledger book, but when he's
>out of town I guess he's not there reminding me what I've spent and so
>I just continue to spend spend spend!
>
>Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
>facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
>a few others that simply don't work for me.
>
>Thanks so much!
>Katherine

Lock the cards away and give hubby the key.

Facial cleansers: Spend about $2 and buy a bottle each of hydrogen peroxide,
rubbing alcohol, witch hazel, and some cotton balls.


caveat lector

Halcitron misc.survivalism
Check your six and know when to duck.
NRA Member since 2002
The Law of the Land, is the weapon in your hand.

Smith & Wesson starts where the Bill of Rights stop.

Halcitron
July 6th 03, 09:08 PM
>From: (Katherine)
>Newsgroups: misc.consumers.frugal-living
>Date: 5 Jul 2003 18:09:42 -0700

>
>Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
>spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
>simply go crazy with the credit cards! This year its been especially
>bad because I've taken up gardening and I (although I do only buy
>things generally on sale, but still!) bought everything - pots, soil,
>mushroom manure, watering cans, shrubs, perennials, fertilizer etc.
>etc.
>
>I have a small yard (very small, 11' wide by 34' deep) because I'm in
>a ground floor condo, but I have a small worm composter so hopefully I
>can condition my soil somewhat for next season so I won't have to buy
>mushroom manure. And I started my veggies from seeds so that helped a
>bit.
>
>Anyways, some of my impulse buying has been expensive facial
>cleansers, etc. (Dermalogica) because I had severely dehyrdated skin
>and thankfully the expensive stuff has helped my skin, but not my
>credit card! And some clothing, although I do shop at consignment
>stores I tend to purchase more clothes than I really need.
>
>We are doing OK right now, $3500 in debt on my card, which I know is
>too much, but still not THAT bad either. My fear is that it will get
>worse. We are trying to pay off our credit cards and save for a house
>so this certainly isn't helping!
>
>My husband keeps track of our spending in a ledger book, but when he's
>out of town I guess he's not there reminding me what I've spent and so
>I just continue to spend spend spend!
>
>Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
>facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
>a few others that simply don't work for me.
>
>Thanks so much!
>Katherine

Lock the cards away and give hubby the key.

Facial cleansers: Spend about $2 and buy a bottle each of hydrogen peroxide,
rubbing alcohol, witch hazel, and some cotton balls.


caveat lector

Halcitron misc.survivalism
Check your six and know when to duck.
NRA Member since 2002
The Law of the Land, is the weapon in your hand.

Smith & Wesson starts where the Bill of Rights stop.

Halcitron
July 6th 03, 09:12 PM
>From: (JoelnCaryn)
>Newsgroups: misc.consumers.frugal-living
>Date: 06 Jul 2003 01:56:28 GMT

> I'd put
>them somewhere not easily accessible (like frozen in a chunk of ice in the
>freezer)

But DO NOT defrost in the microwave oven, or you will erase your cards, but
then...


caveat lector

Halcitron misc.survivalism
Check your six and know when to duck.
NRA Member since 2002
The Law of the Land, is the weapon in your hand.

Smith & Wesson starts where the Bill of Rights stop.

Halcitron
July 6th 03, 09:12 PM
>From: (JoelnCaryn)
>Newsgroups: misc.consumers.frugal-living
>Date: 06 Jul 2003 01:56:28 GMT

> I'd put
>them somewhere not easily accessible (like frozen in a chunk of ice in the
>freezer)

But DO NOT defrost in the microwave oven, or you will erase your cards, but
then...


caveat lector

Halcitron misc.survivalism
Check your six and know when to duck.
NRA Member since 2002
The Law of the Land, is the weapon in your hand.

Smith & Wesson starts where the Bill of Rights stop.

Gregory Morrow
July 7th 03, 11:30 AM
Katherine wrote:

You need to get a really *useful* hobby -- try alcoholism..

--
Best
Greg


> Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
> spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
> simply go crazy with the credit cards! This year its been especially
> bad because I've taken up gardening and I (although I do only buy
> things generally on sale, but still!) bought everything - pots, soil,
> mushroom manure, watering cans, shrubs, perennials, fertilizer etc.
> etc.
>
> I have a small yard (very small, 11' wide by 34' deep) because I'm in
> a ground floor condo, but I have a small worm composter so hopefully I
> can condition my soil somewhat for next season so I won't have to buy
> mushroom manure. And I started my veggies from seeds so that helped a
> bit.
>
> Anyways, some of my impulse buying has been expensive facial
> cleansers, etc. (Dermalogica) because I had severely dehyrdated skin
> and thankfully the expensive stuff has helped my skin, but not my
> credit card! And some clothing, although I do shop at consignment
> stores I tend to purchase more clothes than I really need.
>
> We are doing OK right now, $3500 in debt on my card, which I know is
> too much, but still not THAT bad either. My fear is that it will get
> worse. We are trying to pay off our credit cards and save for a house
> so this certainly isn't helping!
>
> My husband keeps track of our spending in a ledger book, but when he's
> out of town I guess he's not there reminding me what I've spent and so
> I just continue to spend spend spend!
>
> Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
> facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
> a few others that simply don't work for me.
>
> Thanks so much!
> Katherine

Gregory Morrow
July 7th 03, 11:30 AM
Katherine wrote:

You need to get a really *useful* hobby -- try alcoholism..

--
Best
Greg


> Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
> spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
> simply go crazy with the credit cards! This year its been especially
> bad because I've taken up gardening and I (although I do only buy
> things generally on sale, but still!) bought everything - pots, soil,
> mushroom manure, watering cans, shrubs, perennials, fertilizer etc.
> etc.
>
> I have a small yard (very small, 11' wide by 34' deep) because I'm in
> a ground floor condo, but I have a small worm composter so hopefully I
> can condition my soil somewhat for next season so I won't have to buy
> mushroom manure. And I started my veggies from seeds so that helped a
> bit.
>
> Anyways, some of my impulse buying has been expensive facial
> cleansers, etc. (Dermalogica) because I had severely dehyrdated skin
> and thankfully the expensive stuff has helped my skin, but not my
> credit card! And some clothing, although I do shop at consignment
> stores I tend to purchase more clothes than I really need.
>
> We are doing OK right now, $3500 in debt on my card, which I know is
> too much, but still not THAT bad either. My fear is that it will get
> worse. We are trying to pay off our credit cards and save for a house
> so this certainly isn't helping!
>
> My husband keeps track of our spending in a ledger book, but when he's
> out of town I guess he's not there reminding me what I've spent and so
> I just continue to spend spend spend!
>
> Any advice on how to curb my impulse buying, and how can I get good
> facial cleansers etc for cheap prices? I have tried olay, noxema and
> a few others that simply don't work for me.
>
> Thanks so much!
> Katherine

Jason W. Paul
July 7th 03, 09:24 PM
> > We are doing OK right now, $3500 in debt on my card, which I know
is
> > too much, but still not THAT bad either.

> Sorry, hon, but $3,500 in credit card debt IS THAT BAD. Any credit
card debt
> that involves interest and that you don't pay off every month IS
THAT BAD,
> and it's especially BAD

Agreed, it's FAR WORSE THAN THAT BAD. Why don't you just
take $600 or $700 , take a match, light it up and watch it burn.
*EVERY YEAR*!!! With most credit cards, that's about what you'd
pay each year on the $3,500 balance you're currently carrying.

Here's a good example: If you took, say, the $600.00 each year
that you're currently paying on interest and invested it in a 5%
investment (low % -- you can still find higher investment returns,
even in today's economy) here's what you'd have:

Year Investment Amount Balance Interest Paid
1 $ 600.00 $ 600.00 $ 30.00
2 $ 600.00 $ 1,230.00 $ 61.50
3 $ 600.00 $ 1,891.50 $ 94.58
4 $ 600.00 $ 2,586.08 $ 129.30
5 $ 600.00 $ 3,315.38 $ 165.77
6 $ 600.00 $ 4,081.15 $ 204.06
7 $ 600.00 $ 4,885.21 $ 244.26
8 $ 600.00 $ 5,729.47 $ 286.47
9 $ 600.00 $ 6,615.94 $ 330.80
10 $ 600.00 $ 7,546.74 $ 377.34
11 $ 600.00 $ 8,524.07 $ 426.20
12 $ 600.00 $ 9,550.28 $ 477.51
13 $ 600.00 $ 10,627.79 $ 531.39
14 $ 600.00 $ 11,759.18 $ 587.96
15 $ 600.00 $ 12,947.14 $ 647.36
16 $ 600.00 $ 14,194.50 $ 709.72
17 $ 600.00 $ 15,504.22 $ 775.21
18 $ 600.00 $ 16,879.43 $ 843.97
19 $ 600.00 $ 18,323.40 $ 916.17
20 $ 600.00 $ 19,839.57 $ 991.98


See the "Balance" column -- you'd have saved a total of
almost 20,000 in 20 years. Additionally, you would not
have the loss of paying out $600.00 in interest each year
on the " ... not THAT bad ..." credit card. (600.00 each
year for 20 years = $12,000 you would not have paid
out. Add 'em up:

1) The 12,000 you would not have paid out
PLUS
2) The 20,000 you've saved by investing what
you're currently paying out and you're looking
at being over 30,000 ahead of the game by not
carrying a balance on your card.

Basically, instead of being in the red by 12,000
after 20 years, you'd be in the black by 20,000
for a net difference of 32,000.

At a higher rate of return on your investment(s),
say 8.5%, the total number is more like $42,000!

If you're still young, like me, you could park that
$40,000 until retirement (a little under 40 years
from now) and the above calculation will yeild
a position of darned close to $200,000 !!!!

That's a lot of jack -- and all you've got to do
is quit using the darned card(s).

Pay the evil things off and get rid of 'em.

You'd now (in a few years) be sitting on a PILE of
cash -- without having to come up with any extra
money to invest -- simply quit paying it out on
credit card interest. You'd simply be utilizing your
*existing* money in a much smarter way.

Don't rationalize them as "not THAT bad" --
They're evil things. Don't let them suck you
in. Pay them off. Now. Don't use them in
the future. If you don't have the cash RIGHT
NOW, then don't buy it (whatever "it" is).

.... and now for the relevant quote of the day:

"Those who understand interest collect it.
Those who don't understand interest are doomed to pay it".

Jason W. Paul
July 7th 03, 09:24 PM
> > We are doing OK right now, $3500 in debt on my card, which I know
is
> > too much, but still not THAT bad either.

> Sorry, hon, but $3,500 in credit card debt IS THAT BAD. Any credit
card debt
> that involves interest and that you don't pay off every month IS
THAT BAD,
> and it's especially BAD

Agreed, it's FAR WORSE THAN THAT BAD. Why don't you just
take $600 or $700 , take a match, light it up and watch it burn.
*EVERY YEAR*!!! With most credit cards, that's about what you'd
pay each year on the $3,500 balance you're currently carrying.

Here's a good example: If you took, say, the $600.00 each year
that you're currently paying on interest and invested it in a 5%
investment (low % -- you can still find higher investment returns,
even in today's economy) here's what you'd have:

Year Investment Amount Balance Interest Paid
1 $ 600.00 $ 600.00 $ 30.00
2 $ 600.00 $ 1,230.00 $ 61.50
3 $ 600.00 $ 1,891.50 $ 94.58
4 $ 600.00 $ 2,586.08 $ 129.30
5 $ 600.00 $ 3,315.38 $ 165.77
6 $ 600.00 $ 4,081.15 $ 204.06
7 $ 600.00 $ 4,885.21 $ 244.26
8 $ 600.00 $ 5,729.47 $ 286.47
9 $ 600.00 $ 6,615.94 $ 330.80
10 $ 600.00 $ 7,546.74 $ 377.34
11 $ 600.00 $ 8,524.07 $ 426.20
12 $ 600.00 $ 9,550.28 $ 477.51
13 $ 600.00 $ 10,627.79 $ 531.39
14 $ 600.00 $ 11,759.18 $ 587.96
15 $ 600.00 $ 12,947.14 $ 647.36
16 $ 600.00 $ 14,194.50 $ 709.72
17 $ 600.00 $ 15,504.22 $ 775.21
18 $ 600.00 $ 16,879.43 $ 843.97
19 $ 600.00 $ 18,323.40 $ 916.17
20 $ 600.00 $ 19,839.57 $ 991.98


See the "Balance" column -- you'd have saved a total of
almost 20,000 in 20 years. Additionally, you would not
have the loss of paying out $600.00 in interest each year
on the " ... not THAT bad ..." credit card. (600.00 each
year for 20 years = $12,000 you would not have paid
out. Add 'em up:

1) The 12,000 you would not have paid out
PLUS
2) The 20,000 you've saved by investing what
you're currently paying out and you're looking
at being over 30,000 ahead of the game by not
carrying a balance on your card.

Basically, instead of being in the red by 12,000
after 20 years, you'd be in the black by 20,000
for a net difference of 32,000.

At a higher rate of return on your investment(s),
say 8.5%, the total number is more like $42,000!

If you're still young, like me, you could park that
$40,000 until retirement (a little under 40 years
from now) and the above calculation will yeild
a position of darned close to $200,000 !!!!

That's a lot of jack -- and all you've got to do
is quit using the darned card(s).

Pay the evil things off and get rid of 'em.

You'd now (in a few years) be sitting on a PILE of
cash -- without having to come up with any extra
money to invest -- simply quit paying it out on
credit card interest. You'd simply be utilizing your
*existing* money in a much smarter way.

Don't rationalize them as "not THAT bad" --
They're evil things. Don't let them suck you
in. Pay them off. Now. Don't use them in
the future. If you don't have the cash RIGHT
NOW, then don't buy it (whatever "it" is).

.... and now for the relevant quote of the day:

"Those who understand interest collect it.
Those who don't understand interest are doomed to pay it".

Larisa
July 8th 03, 12:09 AM
(Katherine) wrote in message >...
> Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
> spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
> simply go crazy with the credit cards!

Write down everything you spend. That's what helped me. Seeing the
astronomical sum adding up really brought it home to me just how much
I was spending. I don't spend that much anymore.

LM

Larisa
July 8th 03, 12:09 AM
(Katherine) wrote in message >...
> Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
> spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
> simply go crazy with the credit cards!

Write down everything you spend. That's what helped me. Seeing the
astronomical sum adding up really brought it home to me just how much
I was spending. I don't spend that much anymore.

LM

July 10th 03, 03:43 AM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote
> The little muffin mixes by Jiffy are very cheap and quite
> good, I've found.
>
> We got a bunch of them at four for a dollar.
> Pat


Yah, they're really good . . . friend of mine mixes the corn muffin mix with
corn (fresh from the can, or frozen) in with the batter with a bit of sugar,
and it comes out quite tasty . . . enough to inspire friendly thoughts of
vegetarianism . . .
--Tock

July 10th 03, 03:43 AM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote
> The little muffin mixes by Jiffy are very cheap and quite
> good, I've found.
>
> We got a bunch of them at four for a dollar.
> Pat


Yah, they're really good . . . friend of mine mixes the corn muffin mix with
corn (fresh from the can, or frozen) in with the batter with a bit of sugar,
and it comes out quite tasty . . . enough to inspire friendly thoughts of
vegetarianism . . .
--Tock

Katherine
July 11th 03, 06:05 PM
"Jason W. Paul" > wrote in message >...
> > I work in police services as a dispatcher, and I also have a part
> time
> > job in a library which keeps me busy two saturdays a month. So
> > between the two of us, the money coming in is reasonable, and we pay
> > whats due on the statements off every month so the interest isn't an
> > issue
>
> Unless you're paying off the *entire balance*, then interest
> *is* an issue.

Thats not true... its the balance owing on the statement... not the
entire balance on the card.

If you've charged things since the statement has come out then you
don't pay interest until those charges come due. For example, if I
charge $100 on my card yesterday, I do not instantly start paying
interest on that amount. Its only if I do not pay that $100 off when
its due (plus whatever else is due) that I start paying interest, from
the day I charged the $100 on my card.

Unless you are in the states and things are different there??? But
that is the way it is here in canada. And yes, like I said we pay the
balance owing off in full, so we pay zero interest. My balance is due
June 16th and I am paying off the full balance today as I've just been
paid... and to give a few days in case the payment takes a few days to
get processed I pay it now, on the 11th.

Katherine
July 11th 03, 06:05 PM
"Jason W. Paul" > wrote in message >...
> > I work in police services as a dispatcher, and I also have a part
> time
> > job in a library which keeps me busy two saturdays a month. So
> > between the two of us, the money coming in is reasonable, and we pay
> > whats due on the statements off every month so the interest isn't an
> > issue
>
> Unless you're paying off the *entire balance*, then interest
> *is* an issue.

Thats not true... its the balance owing on the statement... not the
entire balance on the card.

If you've charged things since the statement has come out then you
don't pay interest until those charges come due. For example, if I
charge $100 on my card yesterday, I do not instantly start paying
interest on that amount. Its only if I do not pay that $100 off when
its due (plus whatever else is due) that I start paying interest, from
the day I charged the $100 on my card.

Unless you are in the states and things are different there??? But
that is the way it is here in canada. And yes, like I said we pay the
balance owing off in full, so we pay zero interest. My balance is due
June 16th and I am paying off the full balance today as I've just been
paid... and to give a few days in case the payment takes a few days to
get processed I pay it now, on the 11th.

Katherine
July 11th 03, 06:08 PM
I have done this in the past and it does help! Thanks for the
reminder. My hubby does it when he's here so maybe thats the
problem... its too easy to loose track if you don't write things down.
I need to allow myself some spending $$ of course, but if I think of
a certain amount per pay and don't keep track of course I'm going to
go over! Or if I want something big then I need to not spend the full
amount for a while and then buy it once i've "saved" up enough.

Thanks everyone... I love the advice about making muffins at home,
facial cleansers, keeping track of things and lots others. Some of
these things I knew, but needed a friendly reminder :)

Thanks again,
Katherine


(Larisa) wrote in message >...
> (Katherine) wrote in message >...
> > Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
> > spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
> > simply go crazy with the credit cards!
>
> Write down everything you spend. That's what helped me. Seeing the
> astronomical sum adding up really brought it home to me just how much
> I was spending. I don't spend that much anymore.
>
> LM

Katherine
July 11th 03, 06:08 PM
I have done this in the past and it does help! Thanks for the
reminder. My hubby does it when he's here so maybe thats the
problem... its too easy to loose track if you don't write things down.
I need to allow myself some spending $$ of course, but if I think of
a certain amount per pay and don't keep track of course I'm going to
go over! Or if I want something big then I need to not spend the full
amount for a while and then buy it once i've "saved" up enough.

Thanks everyone... I love the advice about making muffins at home,
facial cleansers, keeping track of things and lots others. Some of
these things I knew, but needed a friendly reminder :)

Thanks again,
Katherine


(Larisa) wrote in message >...
> (Katherine) wrote in message >...
> > Could I please get some helpful advice on how to stop my impulse
> > spending? I have the worst time when my husband is out of town - I
> > simply go crazy with the credit cards!
>
> Write down everything you spend. That's what helped me. Seeing the
> astronomical sum adding up really brought it home to me just how much
> I was spending. I don't spend that much anymore.
>
> LM

Joyce
July 11th 03, 07:35 PM
On 11 Jul 2003 09:05:01 -0700, (Katherine)
wrote:

>"Jason W. Paul" > wrote in message >...
>> > I work in police services as a dispatcher, and I also have a part
>> time
>> > job in a library which keeps me busy two saturdays a month. So
>> > between the two of us, the money coming in is reasonable, and we pay
>> > whats due on the statements off every month so the interest isn't an
>> > issue
>>
>> Unless you're paying off the *entire balance*, then interest
>> *is* an issue.
>
>Thats not true... its the balance owing on the statement... not the
>entire balance on the card.
>
>If you've charged things since the statement has come out then you
>don't pay interest until those charges come due. For example, if I
>charge $100 on my card yesterday, I do not instantly start paying
>interest on that amount. Its only if I do not pay that $100 off when
>its due (plus whatever else is due) that I start paying interest, from
>the day I charged the $100 on my card.
>
>Unless you are in the states and things are different there??? But
>that is the way it is here in canada. And yes, like I said we pay the
>balance owing off in full, so we pay zero interest. My balance is due
>June 16th and I am paying off the full balance today as I've just been
>paid... and to give a few days in case the payment takes a few days to
>get processed I pay it now, on the 11th.

Then how can you be in credit card debt for $3500.?????
Joyce

Joyce
July 11th 03, 07:35 PM
On 11 Jul 2003 09:05:01 -0700, (Katherine)
wrote:

>"Jason W. Paul" > wrote in message >...
>> > I work in police services as a dispatcher, and I also have a part
>> time
>> > job in a library which keeps me busy two saturdays a month. So
>> > between the two of us, the money coming in is reasonable, and we pay
>> > whats due on the statements off every month so the interest isn't an
>> > issue
>>
>> Unless you're paying off the *entire balance*, then interest
>> *is* an issue.
>
>Thats not true... its the balance owing on the statement... not the
>entire balance on the card.
>
>If you've charged things since the statement has come out then you
>don't pay interest until those charges come due. For example, if I
>charge $100 on my card yesterday, I do not instantly start paying
>interest on that amount. Its only if I do not pay that $100 off when
>its due (plus whatever else is due) that I start paying interest, from
>the day I charged the $100 on my card.
>
>Unless you are in the states and things are different there??? But
>that is the way it is here in canada. And yes, like I said we pay the
>balance owing off in full, so we pay zero interest. My balance is due
>June 16th and I am paying off the full balance today as I've just been
>paid... and to give a few days in case the payment takes a few days to
>get processed I pay it now, on the 11th.

Then how can you be in credit card debt for $3500.?????
Joyce

linda-renee
July 13th 03, 06:10 PM
"Katherine" > wrote in message

> "Jason W. Paul" > wrote in message

> > > So
> > > between the two of us, the money coming in is reasonable, and we pay
> > > whats due on the statements off every month so the interest isn't an
> > > issue

> > Unless you're paying off the *entire balance*, then interest
> > *is* an issue.

> Thats not true... its the balance owing on the statement... not the
> entire balance on the card.

> If you've charged things since the statement has come out then you
> don't pay interest until those charges come due. For example, if I
> charge $100 on my card yesterday, I do not instantly start paying
> interest on that amount. Its only if I do not pay that $100 off when
> its due (plus whatever else is due) that I start paying interest, from
> the day I charged the $100 on my card.

If you truly had a zero balance before charging anything, then you would
have the grace period (although some cards have even eliminated that). If
you have any kind of outstanding balance after the statement due date, then
every purchase you make and have made will incur interest from the date of
purchase. Payments you make will go toward the newer charges, so the older
charges may hang around forever until you decide to pay off every cent you
owe.

Perhaps that is how you got to a $3500 balance without really grasping what
you were doing...

linda-renee
July 13th 03, 06:10 PM
"Katherine" > wrote in message

> "Jason W. Paul" > wrote in message

> > > So
> > > between the two of us, the money coming in is reasonable, and we pay
> > > whats due on the statements off every month so the interest isn't an
> > > issue

> > Unless you're paying off the *entire balance*, then interest
> > *is* an issue.

> Thats not true... its the balance owing on the statement... not the
> entire balance on the card.

> If you've charged things since the statement has come out then you
> don't pay interest until those charges come due. For example, if I
> charge $100 on my card yesterday, I do not instantly start paying
> interest on that amount. Its only if I do not pay that $100 off when
> its due (plus whatever else is due) that I start paying interest, from
> the day I charged the $100 on my card.

If you truly had a zero balance before charging anything, then you would
have the grace period (although some cards have even eliminated that). If
you have any kind of outstanding balance after the statement due date, then
every purchase you make and have made will incur interest from the date of
purchase. Payments you make will go toward the newer charges, so the older
charges may hang around forever until you decide to pay off every cent you
owe.

Perhaps that is how you got to a $3500 balance without really grasping what
you were doing...

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