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View Full Version : Any idea for a cheap platform to raise washer and dryer ?


chris
July 6th 03, 04:35 AM
Hello,

I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...

Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
too cheap ?

Thanks
Chris

July 6th 03, 05:32 AM
On 5 Jul 2003 19:35:57 -0700, (chris) wrote:

>Hello,
>
>I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
>loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
>been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
>the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive.

>Thanks
>Chris

First question I'd ask is why buy/build the platform?

July 6th 03, 05:32 AM
On 5 Jul 2003 19:35:57 -0700, (chris) wrote:

>Hello,
>
>I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
>loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
>been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
>the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive.

>Thanks
>Chris

First question I'd ask is why buy/build the platform?

Gordon Reeder
July 6th 03, 06:07 AM
(chris) wrote in <2f193fe2.0307051835.173eb7c0
@posting.google.com>:

>Hello,
>
>I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
>loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
>been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
>the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
>if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
>to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
>this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
>vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
>
>Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
>too cheap ?
>
>Thanks
>Chris

Why do you want the platform? Most washer/dryers that I know
of don't have a platform.

As for a cheap one; how about a wooden pallet?

--
Just my $0.02 worth. Hope it helps
Gordon Reeder
greeder
at: myself.com

Gordon Reeder
July 6th 03, 06:07 AM
(chris) wrote in <2f193fe2.0307051835.173eb7c0
@posting.google.com>:

>Hello,
>
>I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
>loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
>been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
>the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
>if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
>to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
>this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
>vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
>
>Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
>too cheap ?
>
>Thanks
>Chris

Why do you want the platform? Most washer/dryers that I know
of don't have a platform.

As for a cheap one; how about a wooden pallet?

--
Just my $0.02 worth. Hope it helps
Gordon Reeder
greeder
at: myself.com

JoelnCaryn
July 6th 03, 02:30 PM
>I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
>loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
>been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
>the washer and dryer.

Well, yeah. But that's just to raise it for people who have back problems
significant enough that bending over to access the washer and dryer causes
problems. And to trick people without back problems into spending $300 for
storage drawers, of course. :-)

I'd stack them or build a counter over them instead in that case -- either will
gain you more usable space for storage. And if you really want them raised,
CMU should work just fine, as you suggest.

JoelnCaryn
July 6th 03, 02:30 PM
>I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
>loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
>been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
>the washer and dryer.

Well, yeah. But that's just to raise it for people who have back problems
significant enough that bending over to access the washer and dryer causes
problems. And to trick people without back problems into spending $300 for
storage drawers, of course. :-)

I'd stack them or build a counter over them instead in that case -- either will
gain you more usable space for storage. And if you really want them raised,
CMU should work just fine, as you suggest.

George
July 6th 03, 03:03 PM
"Gordon Reeder" > wrote in message
...
> (chris) wrote in <2f193fe2.0307051835.173eb7c0
> @posting.google.com>:
>
> >Hello,
> >
> >I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> >loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> >been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> >the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> >if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> >to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> >this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> >vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
> >
> >Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> >too cheap ?
> >
> >Thanks
> >Chris
>
> Why do you want the platform? Most washer/dryers that I know
> of don't have a platform.

A friend just bought a new front loading washer and dryer and have the same
situation. The form of the new front loading machines is that they are more
of a cube and low to the floor. So if you install them without the stand kit
you practically have to kneel down to take things out. They sell a $300
stand kit which lifts the appliances up a good 14" and also has drawers for
storage.

If I used cinder blocks I would stack the blocks and then put a full size
wooden platform on top of the blocks. That would tend to give it more
stability and be an even surface for the appliances.


> As for a cheap one; how about a wooden pallet?
>
> --
> Just my $0.02 worth. Hope it helps
> Gordon Reeder
> greeder
> at: myself.com

George
July 6th 03, 03:03 PM
"Gordon Reeder" > wrote in message
...
> (chris) wrote in <2f193fe2.0307051835.173eb7c0
> @posting.google.com>:
>
> >Hello,
> >
> >I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> >loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> >been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> >the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> >if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> >to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> >this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> >vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
> >
> >Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> >too cheap ?
> >
> >Thanks
> >Chris
>
> Why do you want the platform? Most washer/dryers that I know
> of don't have a platform.

A friend just bought a new front loading washer and dryer and have the same
situation. The form of the new front loading machines is that they are more
of a cube and low to the floor. So if you install them without the stand kit
you practically have to kneel down to take things out. They sell a $300
stand kit which lifts the appliances up a good 14" and also has drawers for
storage.

If I used cinder blocks I would stack the blocks and then put a full size
wooden platform on top of the blocks. That would tend to give it more
stability and be an even surface for the appliances.


> As for a cheap one; how about a wooden pallet?
>
> --
> Just my $0.02 worth. Hope it helps
> Gordon Reeder
> greeder
> at: myself.com

Don K
July 6th 03, 03:36 PM
"chris" > wrote in message
om...
> Hello,
>
> I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
>
> Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> too cheap ?

Do you know how to use a hammer and saw?
You make a box out of 2x4's and 1 inch plywood for a lot
less than $300, but not a whole lot less if you place any value
on your time.

In general it's not worthwhile to build things you can buy
that are mass-produced, unless you build for your own
enjoyment or to make a better version.

Cinder blocks would work if you don't mind the look.
The washer and dryer will have 1 inch diameter leveling feet,
so you'll need to either set the blocks on their sides or put
a piece of wood on top of the cinderblock holes. I'd
consider using some thick rubber matting to dampen vibrations.

Don

Don K
July 6th 03, 03:36 PM
"chris" > wrote in message
om...
> Hello,
>
> I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
>
> Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> too cheap ?

Do you know how to use a hammer and saw?
You make a box out of 2x4's and 1 inch plywood for a lot
less than $300, but not a whole lot less if you place any value
on your time.

In general it's not worthwhile to build things you can buy
that are mass-produced, unless you build for your own
enjoyment or to make a better version.

Cinder blocks would work if you don't mind the look.
The washer and dryer will have 1 inch diameter leveling feet,
so you'll need to either set the blocks on their sides or put
a piece of wood on top of the cinderblock holes. I'd
consider using some thick rubber matting to dampen vibrations.

Don

Tomcat14
July 6th 03, 04:33 PM
The Real Bev > wrote in message >...
> Gordon Reeder wrote:
>
> > Why do you want the platform? Most washer/dryers that I know
> > of don't have a platform.
> >
> > As for a cheap one; how about a wooden pallet?
>
> Termites.

We're all puzzled as to WHY?

Are you a 7'tall?
Is your home below sea level?
Are you a carnival worker practicing your stilt walking to stay in shape?
Are you afraid the kids will climb in?
Do clothes dry faster at a higher altitude?

Washers especially vibrate like crazy. They like a cement floor if possible.

Tomcat14
July 6th 03, 04:33 PM
The Real Bev > wrote in message >...
> Gordon Reeder wrote:
>
> > Why do you want the platform? Most washer/dryers that I know
> > of don't have a platform.
> >
> > As for a cheap one; how about a wooden pallet?
>
> Termites.

We're all puzzled as to WHY?

Are you a 7'tall?
Is your home below sea level?
Are you a carnival worker practicing your stilt walking to stay in shape?
Are you afraid the kids will climb in?
Do clothes dry faster at a higher altitude?

Washers especially vibrate like crazy. They like a cement floor if possible.

George
July 6th 03, 05:21 PM
"Tomcat14" > wrote in message
om...
> The Real Bev > wrote in message
>...
> > Gordon Reeder wrote:
> >
> > > Why do you want the platform? Most washer/dryers that I know
> > > of don't have a platform.
> > >
> > > As for a cheap one; how about a wooden pallet?
> >
> > Termites.
>
> We're all puzzled as to WHY?
>
> Are you a 7'tall?
> Is your home below sea level?
> Are you a carnival worker practicing your stilt walking to stay in shape?
> Are you afraid the kids will climb in?
> Do clothes dry faster at a higher altitude?
>
> Washers especially vibrate like crazy. They like a cement floor if
possible.

See my earlier post about why. The front load washers do not vibrate like
other washers you have seen (probably because they use such a small amount
of water). When we fired up my friends' washer the first time we thought it
was defective. The solenoid valves opened and admitted a very small amount
of water and then it continued to the wash cycle. If you didn't see the
motion through the glass window in the door you might not notice it was
running.

George
July 6th 03, 05:21 PM
"Tomcat14" > wrote in message
om...
> The Real Bev > wrote in message
>...
> > Gordon Reeder wrote:
> >
> > > Why do you want the platform? Most washer/dryers that I know
> > > of don't have a platform.
> > >
> > > As for a cheap one; how about a wooden pallet?
> >
> > Termites.
>
> We're all puzzled as to WHY?
>
> Are you a 7'tall?
> Is your home below sea level?
> Are you a carnival worker practicing your stilt walking to stay in shape?
> Are you afraid the kids will climb in?
> Do clothes dry faster at a higher altitude?
>
> Washers especially vibrate like crazy. They like a cement floor if
possible.

See my earlier post about why. The front load washers do not vibrate like
other washers you have seen (probably because they use such a small amount
of water). When we fired up my friends' washer the first time we thought it
was defective. The solenoid valves opened and admitted a very small amount
of water and then it continued to the wash cycle. If you didn't see the
motion through the glass window in the door you might not notice it was
running.

chris
July 6th 03, 05:41 PM
The opening for front loader washer/dryer is sitting a bit lower, so
my wife need to bend and pick up clothes. She has bad back, I figure
raising approximately 10 inches will help her back.



The Real Bev > wrote in message >...
> chris wrote:
> >
> > Hello,
> >
> > I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> > loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> > been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> > the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> > if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> > to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> > this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> > vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
> >
> > Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> > too cheap ?
>
> Cinder (cement) blocks will support a car. How high do you want to raise
> them? Why?

chris
July 6th 03, 05:41 PM
The opening for front loader washer/dryer is sitting a bit lower, so
my wife need to bend and pick up clothes. She has bad back, I figure
raising approximately 10 inches will help her back.



The Real Bev > wrote in message >...
> chris wrote:
> >
> > Hello,
> >
> > I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> > loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> > been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> > the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> > if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> > to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> > this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> > vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
> >
> > Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> > too cheap ?
>
> Cinder (cement) blocks will support a car. How high do you want to raise
> them? Why?

chris
July 6th 03, 05:43 PM
My wife has a bad back, so raising 10 inches or so it will help her
not bending too much to get the clothes from dryer/washer.

wrote in message >...
> On 5 Jul 2003 19:35:57 -0700, (chris) wrote:
>
> >Hello,
> >
> >I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> >loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> >been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> >the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive.
>
> >Thanks
> >Chris
>
> First question I'd ask is why buy/build the platform?

chris
July 6th 03, 05:43 PM
My wife has a bad back, so raising 10 inches or so it will help her
not bending too much to get the clothes from dryer/washer.

wrote in message >...
> On 5 Jul 2003 19:35:57 -0700, (chris) wrote:
>
> >Hello,
> >
> >I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> >loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> >been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> >the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive.
>
> >Thanks
> >Chris
>
> First question I'd ask is why buy/build the platform?

Tomcat14
July 6th 03, 08:55 PM
"Don K" > wrote in message >...
> "chris" > wrote in message
> om...
> > Hello,
> >
> > I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> > loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> > been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> > the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> > if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> > to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> > this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> > vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
> >
> > Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> > too cheap ?
>
> Do you know how to use a hammer and saw?
> You make a box out of 2x4's and 1 inch plywood for a lot
> less than $300, but not a whole lot less if you place any value
> on your time.
>
> In general it's not worthwhile to build things you can buy
> that are mass-produced, unless you build for your own
> enjoyment or to make a better version.
>
> Cinder blocks would work if you don't mind the look.
> The washer and dryer will have 1 inch diameter leveling feet,
> so you'll need to either set the blocks on their sides or put
> a piece of wood on top of the cinderblock holes. I'd
> consider using some thick rubber matting to dampen vibrations.
>
> Don

I said earlier that washers like to vibrate. That probably dates me
some. These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
their performance. There is no way I'd spend $300 to lift one up
though. It seems like another case of something supposed to be
improved, but costs more to do the same job. How much water savings
does it take to offset $300 for the stand?

Tomcat14
July 6th 03, 08:55 PM
"Don K" > wrote in message >...
> "chris" > wrote in message
> om...
> > Hello,
> >
> > I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> > loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> > been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> > the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> > if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> > to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> > this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> > vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
> >
> > Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> > too cheap ?
>
> Do you know how to use a hammer and saw?
> You make a box out of 2x4's and 1 inch plywood for a lot
> less than $300, but not a whole lot less if you place any value
> on your time.
>
> In general it's not worthwhile to build things you can buy
> that are mass-produced, unless you build for your own
> enjoyment or to make a better version.
>
> Cinder blocks would work if you don't mind the look.
> The washer and dryer will have 1 inch diameter leveling feet,
> so you'll need to either set the blocks on their sides or put
> a piece of wood on top of the cinderblock holes. I'd
> consider using some thick rubber matting to dampen vibrations.
>
> Don

I said earlier that washers like to vibrate. That probably dates me
some. These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
their performance. There is no way I'd spend $300 to lift one up
though. It seems like another case of something supposed to be
improved, but costs more to do the same job. How much water savings
does it take to offset $300 for the stand?

chris
July 7th 03, 05:14 AM
(Tomcat14) wrote in message >...
> The Real Bev > wrote in message >...
> > Gordon Reeder wrote:
> >
> > > Why do you want the platform? Most washer/dryers that I know
> > > of don't have a platform.
> > >
> > > As for a cheap one; how about a wooden pallet?
> >
> > Termites.
>
> We're all puzzled as to WHY?
>
> Are you a 7'tall?
> Is your home below sea level?
> Are you a carnival worker practicing your stilt walking to stay in shape?
> Are you afraid the kids will climb in?
> Do clothes dry faster at a higher altitude?
>
> Washers especially vibrate like crazy. They like a cement floor if possible.

No, No, No, No, No. Smart ass :-)

My wife has a back problem, and this platform should help her not to
bend down too much when she use the washer/dryer.

I am surprised that so many people are puzzled about the idea of
raising front load washer/dryer. I have been shopping at many stores
such as Sears, HH Greg, Best Buy etc. They all sell and have these
platforms on display. Every salesmen that talk to us try to sell this
platform with the appliances. I thought this is a common stuff.

Chris

chris
July 7th 03, 05:14 AM
(Tomcat14) wrote in message >...
> The Real Bev > wrote in message >...
> > Gordon Reeder wrote:
> >
> > > Why do you want the platform? Most washer/dryers that I know
> > > of don't have a platform.
> > >
> > > As for a cheap one; how about a wooden pallet?
> >
> > Termites.
>
> We're all puzzled as to WHY?
>
> Are you a 7'tall?
> Is your home below sea level?
> Are you a carnival worker practicing your stilt walking to stay in shape?
> Are you afraid the kids will climb in?
> Do clothes dry faster at a higher altitude?
>
> Washers especially vibrate like crazy. They like a cement floor if possible.

No, No, No, No, No. Smart ass :-)

My wife has a back problem, and this platform should help her not to
bend down too much when she use the washer/dryer.

I am surprised that so many people are puzzled about the idea of
raising front load washer/dryer. I have been shopping at many stores
such as Sears, HH Greg, Best Buy etc. They all sell and have these
platforms on display. Every salesmen that talk to us try to sell this
platform with the appliances. I thought this is a common stuff.

Chris

chris
July 7th 03, 05:31 AM
"Don K" > wrote in message >...
> "chris" > wrote in message
> om...
> > Hello,
> >
> > I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> > loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> > been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> > the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> > if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> > to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> > this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> > vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
> >
> > Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> > too cheap ?
>
> Do you know how to use a hammer and saw?
> You make a box out of 2x4's and 1 inch plywood for a lot
> less than $300, but not a whole lot less if you place any value
> on your time.
>
> In general it's not worthwhile to build things you can buy
> that are mass-produced, unless you build for your own
> enjoyment or to make a better version.
>
> Cinder blocks would work if you don't mind the look.
> The washer and dryer will have 1 inch diameter leveling feet,
> so you'll need to either set the blocks on their sides or put
> a piece of wood on top of the cinderblock holes. I'd
> consider using some thick rubber matting to dampen vibrations.
>
> Don

I agree, thats why I am thinking cinder block. Just go get them and
stack them up. I dont have to spend time building. Good idea about
using rubber to dampen the vibration.

chris
July 7th 03, 05:31 AM
"Don K" > wrote in message >...
> "chris" > wrote in message
> om...
> > Hello,
> >
> > I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> > loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> > been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> > the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> > if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> > to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> > this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> > vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
> >
> > Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> > too cheap ?
>
> Do you know how to use a hammer and saw?
> You make a box out of 2x4's and 1 inch plywood for a lot
> less than $300, but not a whole lot less if you place any value
> on your time.
>
> In general it's not worthwhile to build things you can buy
> that are mass-produced, unless you build for your own
> enjoyment or to make a better version.
>
> Cinder blocks would work if you don't mind the look.
> The washer and dryer will have 1 inch diameter leveling feet,
> so you'll need to either set the blocks on their sides or put
> a piece of wood on top of the cinderblock holes. I'd
> consider using some thick rubber matting to dampen vibrations.
>
> Don

I agree, thats why I am thinking cinder block. Just go get them and
stack them up. I dont have to spend time building. Good idea about
using rubber to dampen the vibration.

Julie
July 7th 03, 05:48 AM
On 6 Jul 2003 20:14:26 -0700, (chris) wrote:

>I am surprised that so many people are puzzled about the idea of
>raising front load washer/dryer. I have been shopping at many stores
>such as Sears, HH Greg, Best Buy etc. They all sell and have these
>platforms on display. Every salesmen that talk to us try to sell this
>platform with the appliances. I thought this is a common stuff.

Front loading washer/dryers are the norm here in the UK and I have
never seen anything sold to raise them off the ground. Top-loaders
are probably far worse for a bad back then front loaders because you
have to reach over them to unload. With a front loader, one can bend
at the knees, or even kneel, to unload them.

The platforms sound like a complete rip-off to me.

Julie S

Julie
July 7th 03, 05:48 AM
On 6 Jul 2003 20:14:26 -0700, (chris) wrote:

>I am surprised that so many people are puzzled about the idea of
>raising front load washer/dryer. I have been shopping at many stores
>such as Sears, HH Greg, Best Buy etc. They all sell and have these
>platforms on display. Every salesmen that talk to us try to sell this
>platform with the appliances. I thought this is a common stuff.

Front loading washer/dryers are the norm here in the UK and I have
never seen anything sold to raise them off the ground. Top-loaders
are probably far worse for a bad back then front loaders because you
have to reach over them to unload. With a front loader, one can bend
at the knees, or even kneel, to unload them.

The platforms sound like a complete rip-off to me.

Julie S

Starsha
July 7th 03, 08:43 AM
"chris" > wrote

> been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300
platform to raise
> the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I
am thinking
> if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am
thinking just
> to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am
not sure if
> this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances
will
> vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
>
My dryer (not a front-loader) is on cinder blocks, has been
for several years. The lint screen is inside, in the back -
a poor design, particularly if one is aging or has back
problems.

I have not had any problems with the arrangement. I was
quite amused the first time I noticed the new front-loaders
displayed on their stand in a store. I had no idea the
stand costs that much!

Enjoy your new home AND appliances,
S

Starsha
July 7th 03, 08:43 AM
"chris" > wrote

> been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300
platform to raise
> the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I
am thinking
> if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am
thinking just
> to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am
not sure if
> this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances
will
> vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
>
My dryer (not a front-loader) is on cinder blocks, has been
for several years. The lint screen is inside, in the back -
a poor design, particularly if one is aging or has back
problems.

I have not had any problems with the arrangement. I was
quite amused the first time I noticed the new front-loaders
displayed on their stand in a store. I had no idea the
stand costs that much!

Enjoy your new home AND appliances,
S

JoelnCaryn
July 7th 03, 11:18 AM
>I am surprised that so many people are puzzled about the idea of
>raising front load washer/dryer. I have been shopping at many stores
>such as Sears, HH Greg, Best Buy etc. They all sell and have these
>platforms on display. Every salesmen that talk to us try to sell this
>platform with the appliances. I thought this is a common stuff.

Just because they have things doesn't necessarily mean you need them. :-)

We're all generally suspicious of things salesmen try to sell you unless we can
think of a good reason why you'd want those things. I think your wife's back
problem qualifies nicely, though.

JoelnCaryn
July 7th 03, 11:18 AM
>I am surprised that so many people are puzzled about the idea of
>raising front load washer/dryer. I have been shopping at many stores
>such as Sears, HH Greg, Best Buy etc. They all sell and have these
>platforms on display. Every salesmen that talk to us try to sell this
>platform with the appliances. I thought this is a common stuff.

Just because they have things doesn't necessarily mean you need them. :-)

We're all generally suspicious of things salesmen try to sell you unless we can
think of a good reason why you'd want those things. I think your wife's back
problem qualifies nicely, though.

Tomcat14
July 7th 03, 02:54 PM
(Nick Pine) wrote in message >...
> Tomcat14 > wrote:
>
> >These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
> >their performance.
>
> Really?
>
> >How much water savings does it take to offset $300 for the stand?
>
> How does the stand save water?
>
> Nick

The stand itself doesn't save water, Nick. However, the new front
loaders are sold at higher prices because they supposedly save water
and are quieter. By tumbling the clothes through the water they don't
have to be submersed. Therefore, less water is used.

Tomcat14
July 7th 03, 02:54 PM
(Nick Pine) wrote in message >...
> Tomcat14 > wrote:
>
> >These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
> >their performance.
>
> Really?
>
> >How much water savings does it take to offset $300 for the stand?
>
> How does the stand save water?
>
> Nick

The stand itself doesn't save water, Nick. However, the new front
loaders are sold at higher prices because they supposedly save water
and are quieter. By tumbling the clothes through the water they don't
have to be submersed. Therefore, less water is used.

judy
July 7th 03, 04:47 PM
(chris) wrote in message >...
> Hello,
>
> Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> too cheap ?

Chris--

Sounds like you have the same set that we do. A couple of weeks ago my
husband used scrap lumber to make platforms. Can't tell you how much
your wife will appreciate it.

Just make sure they are sturdy--and level!

We wondered about the $300 stands until we had it for a few
months--they are low and the platform really saves on the back. We
don't need the drawers--have supplies on a shelf. I suppose if you had
a fancy laundry room it would be nice to have stuff out of sight. We
have a 75-year-old basement and a box of Tide doesn't spoil the
ambiance!

judy
July 7th 03, 04:47 PM
(chris) wrote in message >...
> Hello,
>
> Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> too cheap ?

Chris--

Sounds like you have the same set that we do. A couple of weeks ago my
husband used scrap lumber to make platforms. Can't tell you how much
your wife will appreciate it.

Just make sure they are sturdy--and level!

We wondered about the $300 stands until we had it for a few
months--they are low and the platform really saves on the back. We
don't need the drawers--have supplies on a shelf. I suppose if you had
a fancy laundry room it would be nice to have stuff out of sight. We
have a 75-year-old basement and a box of Tide doesn't spoil the
ambiance!

Dennis
July 7th 03, 06:08 PM
On 6 Jul 2003 20:14:26 -0700, (chris) wrote:

(Tomcat14) wrote in message >...
>> We're all puzzled as to WHY?
>>
>> Are you a 7'tall?
>> Is your home below sea level?
>> Are you a carnival worker practicing your stilt walking to stay in shape?
>> Are you afraid the kids will climb in?
>> Do clothes dry faster at a higher altitude?
>>
>> Washers especially vibrate like crazy. They like a cement floor if possible.
>
>No, No, No, No, No. Smart ass :-)
>
>My wife has a back problem, and this platform should help her not to
>bend down too much when she use the washer/dryer.

Or, you could do the laundry instead of your wife. Just a (frugal)
thought.

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

Dennis
July 7th 03, 06:08 PM
On 6 Jul 2003 20:14:26 -0700, (chris) wrote:

(Tomcat14) wrote in message >...
>> We're all puzzled as to WHY?
>>
>> Are you a 7'tall?
>> Is your home below sea level?
>> Are you a carnival worker practicing your stilt walking to stay in shape?
>> Are you afraid the kids will climb in?
>> Do clothes dry faster at a higher altitude?
>>
>> Washers especially vibrate like crazy. They like a cement floor if possible.
>
>No, No, No, No, No. Smart ass :-)
>
>My wife has a back problem, and this platform should help her not to
>bend down too much when she use the washer/dryer.

Or, you could do the laundry instead of your wife. Just a (frugal)
thought.

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

Don K
July 8th 03, 01:14 AM
"Nick Pine" > wrote in message
...
> Tomcat14 > wrote:
>
> >These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
> >their performance.
>
> Really?
> Nick

^^^^^^
It stands to reason that if you don't trim the flap at the tip of the
wastewater outlet you will get less spillage. Since fluid is
ejected under pressure, it's desirable to have a tight fit at the
mating surface.

Don

Don K
July 8th 03, 01:14 AM
"Nick Pine" > wrote in message
...
> Tomcat14 > wrote:
>
> >These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
> >their performance.
>
> Really?
> Nick

^^^^^^
It stands to reason that if you don't trim the flap at the tip of the
wastewater outlet you will get less spillage. Since fluid is
ejected under pressure, it's desirable to have a tight fit at the
mating surface.

Don

The Real Bev
July 8th 03, 01:14 AM
wrote:
>
> "Tomcat14" > wrote in message
> om...
> > (Nick Pine) wrote in message
> >...
> > > Tomcat14 > wrote:
> > >
> > > >These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
> > > >their performance.
> > >
> > > Really?
> > >
> > > >How much water savings does it take to offset $300 for the stand?
> > >
> > > How does the stand save water?
> > >
> > > Nick
> >
> > The stand itself doesn't save water, Nick. However, the new front
> > loaders are sold at higher prices because they supposedly save water
> > and are quieter. By tumbling the clothes through the water they don't
> > have to be submersed. Therefore, less water is used.
>
> Call me water-wasteful, but I like the idea of lots of water in with the
> laundry. Gives the dirt & etc more solution in which to mix, less dirt per
> gallon means cleaner laundry.

Apparently front loaders give a more vigorous wash, physically extracting
more dirt than the more passive top-loading system. Or so I've heard.

> But that's just me . . . Here in the Dallas area you see lots of big
> companies over-watering their vast grounds, lots of water goes leaking on
> the streets from broken/leaky pipes, etc. so I figure an extra gallon of
> water per load a few times per week won't make that much difference. I'll
> worry about it when the big guys start to worry about it . . .

In California the farmers use 9x% of the water, with cities and suburbs
using the rest. While the idea of conserving water is good, the actual
amount saved even if you NEVER use any is minuscule.

--
Cheers,
Bev
---------------------------------------------
"The primary purpose of any government entity
is to employ the unemployable."

The Real Bev
July 8th 03, 01:14 AM
wrote:
>
> "Tomcat14" > wrote in message
> om...
> > (Nick Pine) wrote in message
> >...
> > > Tomcat14 > wrote:
> > >
> > > >These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
> > > >their performance.
> > >
> > > Really?
> > >
> > > >How much water savings does it take to offset $300 for the stand?
> > >
> > > How does the stand save water?
> > >
> > > Nick
> >
> > The stand itself doesn't save water, Nick. However, the new front
> > loaders are sold at higher prices because they supposedly save water
> > and are quieter. By tumbling the clothes through the water they don't
> > have to be submersed. Therefore, less water is used.
>
> Call me water-wasteful, but I like the idea of lots of water in with the
> laundry. Gives the dirt & etc more solution in which to mix, less dirt per
> gallon means cleaner laundry.

Apparently front loaders give a more vigorous wash, physically extracting
more dirt than the more passive top-loading system. Or so I've heard.

> But that's just me . . . Here in the Dallas area you see lots of big
> companies over-watering their vast grounds, lots of water goes leaking on
> the streets from broken/leaky pipes, etc. so I figure an extra gallon of
> water per load a few times per week won't make that much difference. I'll
> worry about it when the big guys start to worry about it . . .

In California the farmers use 9x% of the water, with cities and suburbs
using the rest. While the idea of conserving water is good, the actual
amount saved even if you NEVER use any is minuscule.

--
Cheers,
Bev
---------------------------------------------
"The primary purpose of any government entity
is to employ the unemployable."

Ed Clarke
July 8th 03, 01:24 AM
In article >, Don K wrote:

>> >These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
>> >their performance.
>>
>> Really?
>> Nick
>
> ^^^^^^
> It stands to reason that if you don't trim the flap at the tip of the
> wastewater outlet you will get less spillage. Since fluid is
> ejected under pressure, it's desirable to have a tight fit at the
> mating surface.

Augghhh! You should be ashamed of that one...

Ed Clarke
July 8th 03, 01:24 AM
In article >, Don K wrote:

>> >These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
>> >their performance.
>>
>> Really?
>> Nick
>
> ^^^^^^
> It stands to reason that if you don't trim the flap at the tip of the
> wastewater outlet you will get less spillage. Since fluid is
> ejected under pressure, it's desirable to have a tight fit at the
> mating surface.

Augghhh! You should be ashamed of that one...

George
July 8th 03, 02:09 AM
> wrote in message
...
>
> "Tomcat14" > wrote in message
> om...
> > (Nick Pine) wrote in message
> >...
> > > Tomcat14 > wrote:
> > >
> > > >These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
> > > >their performance.
> > >
> > > Really?
> > >
> > > >How much water savings does it take to offset $300 for the stand?
> > >
> > > How does the stand save water?
> > >
> > > Nick
> >
> > The stand itself doesn't save water, Nick. However, the new front
> > loaders are sold at higher prices because they supposedly save water
> > and are quieter. By tumbling the clothes through the water they don't
> > have to be submersed. Therefore, less water is used.
>
>
> Call me water-wasteful, but I like the idea of lots of water in with the
> laundry. Gives the dirt & etc more solution in which to mix, less dirt
per
> gallon means cleaner laundry.
> But that's just me . . . Here in the Dallas area you see lots of big
> companies over-watering their vast grounds, lots of water goes leaking on
> the streets from broken/leaky pipes, etc. so I figure an extra gallon of
> water per load a few times per week won't make that much difference.
I'll
> worry about it when the big guys start to worry about it . . .
>
>
There are other savings related to the front loaders. If using heated water
then less water use requires less energy. The quantity of detergent used is
considerably reduced. If your sewage bill is tied to water use as is common
here then that bill will be reduced. Also the clothes have much less
retained water when done so if you use a dryer less energy and time is
required.

Intuitively I would also think that using more water would be better but
according to friends who have the front loaders they get a better result
compared to top loaders. If you watch it work you can see that the small
amount of water moves very aggressively thru the clothes and then is spun
out carrying dirt away.

George
July 8th 03, 02:09 AM
> wrote in message
...
>
> "Tomcat14" > wrote in message
> om...
> > (Nick Pine) wrote in message
> >...
> > > Tomcat14 > wrote:
> > >
> > > >These new front loading washers seem to be a lot more gentile in
> > > >their performance.
> > >
> > > Really?
> > >
> > > >How much water savings does it take to offset $300 for the stand?
> > >
> > > How does the stand save water?
> > >
> > > Nick
> >
> > The stand itself doesn't save water, Nick. However, the new front
> > loaders are sold at higher prices because they supposedly save water
> > and are quieter. By tumbling the clothes through the water they don't
> > have to be submersed. Therefore, less water is used.
>
>
> Call me water-wasteful, but I like the idea of lots of water in with the
> laundry. Gives the dirt & etc more solution in which to mix, less dirt
per
> gallon means cleaner laundry.
> But that's just me . . . Here in the Dallas area you see lots of big
> companies over-watering their vast grounds, lots of water goes leaking on
> the streets from broken/leaky pipes, etc. so I figure an extra gallon of
> water per load a few times per week won't make that much difference.
I'll
> worry about it when the big guys start to worry about it . . .
>
>
There are other savings related to the front loaders. If using heated water
then less water use requires less energy. The quantity of detergent used is
considerably reduced. If your sewage bill is tied to water use as is common
here then that bill will be reduced. Also the clothes have much less
retained water when done so if you use a dryer less energy and time is
required.

Intuitively I would also think that using more water would be better but
according to friends who have the front loaders they get a better result
compared to top loaders. If you watch it work you can see that the small
amount of water moves very aggressively thru the clothes and then is spun
out carrying dirt away.

lpogoda
July 8th 03, 02:41 AM
Dennis wrote in message >...
>On 6 Jul 2003 20:14:26 -0700, (chris) wrote:
>
(Tomcat14) wrote in message
>...
>>> We're all puzzled as to WHY?
>>>
>>> Are you a 7'tall?
>>> Is your home below sea level?
>>> Are you a carnival worker practicing your stilt walking to stay in
shape?
>>> Are you afraid the kids will climb in?
>>> Do clothes dry faster at a higher altitude?
>>>
>>> Washers especially vibrate like crazy. They like a cement floor if
possible.
>>
>>No, No, No, No, No. Smart ass :-)
>>
>>My wife has a back problem, and this platform should help her not to
>>bend down too much when she use the washer/dryer.
>
>Or, you could do the laundry instead of your wife. Just a (frugal)
>thought.
>
You could do both. Laundry is no substitute for intercourse.

lpogoda
July 8th 03, 02:41 AM
Dennis wrote in message >...
>On 6 Jul 2003 20:14:26 -0700, (chris) wrote:
>
(Tomcat14) wrote in message
>...
>>> We're all puzzled as to WHY?
>>>
>>> Are you a 7'tall?
>>> Is your home below sea level?
>>> Are you a carnival worker practicing your stilt walking to stay in
shape?
>>> Are you afraid the kids will climb in?
>>> Do clothes dry faster at a higher altitude?
>>>
>>> Washers especially vibrate like crazy. They like a cement floor if
possible.
>>
>>No, No, No, No, No. Smart ass :-)
>>
>>My wife has a back problem, and this platform should help her not to
>>bend down too much when she use the washer/dryer.
>
>Or, you could do the laundry instead of your wife. Just a (frugal)
>thought.
>
You could do both. Laundry is no substitute for intercourse.

SLOGIC
July 8th 03, 10:01 PM
I found a site that sells commercial style washer and dryer bases that
are made of steel (laundromat quality)
check out http://www.laundrysupplies.com

(judy) wrote in message >...
> (chris) wrote in message >...
> > Hello,
> >
> > Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> > too cheap ?
>
> Chris--
>
> Sounds like you have the same set that we do. A couple of weeks ago my
> husband used scrap lumber to make platforms. Can't tell you how much
> your wife will appreciate it.
>
> Just make sure they are sturdy--and level!
>
> We wondered about the $300 stands until we had it for a few
> months--they are low and the platform really saves on the back. We
> don't need the drawers--have supplies on a shelf. I suppose if you had
> a fancy laundry room it would be nice to have stuff out of sight. We
> have a 75-year-old basement and a box of Tide doesn't spoil the
> ambiance!

SLOGIC
July 8th 03, 10:01 PM
I found a site that sells commercial style washer and dryer bases that
are made of steel (laundromat quality)
check out http://www.laundrysupplies.com

(judy) wrote in message >...
> (chris) wrote in message >...
> > Hello,
> >
> > Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> > too cheap ?
>
> Chris--
>
> Sounds like you have the same set that we do. A couple of weeks ago my
> husband used scrap lumber to make platforms. Can't tell you how much
> your wife will appreciate it.
>
> Just make sure they are sturdy--and level!
>
> We wondered about the $300 stands until we had it for a few
> months--they are low and the platform really saves on the back. We
> don't need the drawers--have supplies on a shelf. I suppose if you had
> a fancy laundry room it would be nice to have stuff out of sight. We
> have a 75-year-old basement and a box of Tide doesn't spoil the
> ambiance!

Patricia
July 8th 03, 10:42 PM
> From: Joyce >
> I've come to the same conclusion. I had a flood in the basement last
> month and two Maytag top-loaders are ruined. I can't decide whether
> to get them fixed or buy a new one. I was hot for one of the Maytag
> Nautilus front loaders, until I went to the laundromat. Their new
> front-loaders did not get my laundry as clean as my top -loaders
> at home did. The owner had just installed all these front-loaders to
> save on water and electricity. I put my laundry through twice!
> Joyce
----

Hi, Joyce:

I've come to the same conclusion after using my son and DIL's front loading
Maytag equipment. Pesky to do the extra bending and stooping. White
clothes didn't look any better...same detergent used.

I did some reading on line, checked Consumers and both efforts support
looking at the Fischer-Paykel machines. I hear the washer is a little noisy
but they seem seel recommended by all sources.

Another is the Kenmore Elite,, a best buy for the money.

I need to think about this soon. The old one is throwing oil, is 14 years
old and it's days, I fear, are numbered. (G)

Patricia

Patricia
July 8th 03, 10:42 PM
> From: Joyce >
> I've come to the same conclusion. I had a flood in the basement last
> month and two Maytag top-loaders are ruined. I can't decide whether
> to get them fixed or buy a new one. I was hot for one of the Maytag
> Nautilus front loaders, until I went to the laundromat. Their new
> front-loaders did not get my laundry as clean as my top -loaders
> at home did. The owner had just installed all these front-loaders to
> save on water and electricity. I put my laundry through twice!
> Joyce
----

Hi, Joyce:

I've come to the same conclusion after using my son and DIL's front loading
Maytag equipment. Pesky to do the extra bending and stooping. White
clothes didn't look any better...same detergent used.

I did some reading on line, checked Consumers and both efforts support
looking at the Fischer-Paykel machines. I hear the washer is a little noisy
but they seem seel recommended by all sources.

Another is the Kenmore Elite,, a best buy for the money.

I need to think about this soon. The old one is throwing oil, is 14 years
old and it's days, I fear, are numbered. (G)

Patricia

July 9th 03, 01:14 AM
"Joyce" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 22:37:56 GMT, > wrote:
>
>
> >Call me water-wasteful, but I like the idea of lots of water in with the
> >laundry. Gives the dirt & etc more solution in which to mix, less dirt
per
> >gallon means cleaner laundry.
> >But that's just me . . . Here in the Dallas area you see lots of big
> >companies over-watering their vast grounds, lots of water goes leaking on
> >the streets from broken/leaky pipes, etc. so I figure an extra gallon of
> >water per load a few times per week won't make that much difference.
I'll
> >worry about it when the big guys start to worry about it . . .
> >
>
> I've come to the same conclusion. I had a flood in the basement last
> month and two Maytag top-loaders are ruined. I can't decide whether
> to get them fixed or buy a new one. I was hot for one of the Maytag
> Nautilus front loaders, until I went to the laundromat. Their new
> front-loaders did not get my laundry as clean as my top -loaders
> at home did. The owner had just installed all these front-loaders to
> save on water and electricity. I put my laundry through twice!
> Joyce

Yah, I had a White-Westinghouse front loader for 14 years, and I was glad
when it finally died. Couldn't put more than 2 pair of jeans in without
having the works get all knotted up . . . being tall, I really didn't care
for bending over to fish out the wet laundry. And it had a light bulb to
illuminate the inside, and I never could figure out how to replace it. Got
a top loader now, and life is a bed of roses . . .

July 9th 03, 01:14 AM
"Joyce" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 22:37:56 GMT, > wrote:
>
>
> >Call me water-wasteful, but I like the idea of lots of water in with the
> >laundry. Gives the dirt & etc more solution in which to mix, less dirt
per
> >gallon means cleaner laundry.
> >But that's just me . . . Here in the Dallas area you see lots of big
> >companies over-watering their vast grounds, lots of water goes leaking on
> >the streets from broken/leaky pipes, etc. so I figure an extra gallon of
> >water per load a few times per week won't make that much difference.
I'll
> >worry about it when the big guys start to worry about it . . .
> >
>
> I've come to the same conclusion. I had a flood in the basement last
> month and two Maytag top-loaders are ruined. I can't decide whether
> to get them fixed or buy a new one. I was hot for one of the Maytag
> Nautilus front loaders, until I went to the laundromat. Their new
> front-loaders did not get my laundry as clean as my top -loaders
> at home did. The owner had just installed all these front-loaders to
> save on water and electricity. I put my laundry through twice!
> Joyce

Yah, I had a White-Westinghouse front loader for 14 years, and I was glad
when it finally died. Couldn't put more than 2 pair of jeans in without
having the works get all knotted up . . . being tall, I really didn't care
for bending over to fish out the wet laundry. And it had a light bulb to
illuminate the inside, and I never could figure out how to replace it. Got
a top loader now, and life is a bed of roses . . .

Joyce
July 9th 03, 11:33 AM
On Tue, 08 Jul 2003 23:14:54 GMT, > wrote:


>Yah, I had a White-Westinghouse front loader for 14 years, and I was glad
>when it finally died. Couldn't put more than 2 pair of jeans in without
>having the works get all knotted up . . . being tall, I really didn't care
>for bending over to fish out the wet laundry. And it had a light bulb to
>illuminate the inside, and I never could figure out how to replace it. Got
>a top loader now, and life is a bed of roses . . .
>

What top-loader did you get, Tock?
Joyce

Joyce
July 9th 03, 11:33 AM
On Tue, 08 Jul 2003 23:14:54 GMT, > wrote:


>Yah, I had a White-Westinghouse front loader for 14 years, and I was glad
>when it finally died. Couldn't put more than 2 pair of jeans in without
>having the works get all knotted up . . . being tall, I really didn't care
>for bending over to fish out the wet laundry. And it had a light bulb to
>illuminate the inside, and I never could figure out how to replace it. Got
>a top loader now, and life is a bed of roses . . .
>

What top-loader did you get, Tock?
Joyce

July 10th 03, 03:41 AM
"Joyce" > wrote
> What top-loader did you get, Tock?
> Joyce


Some ancient Hotpoint . . . it's used, probably made back in the Roosevelt
administration, but it works great . . .for now, anyways. I figured out
how to make it wash with warm water, at a high water level, and on the "wash
and wear" cycle, and that's what I wash everything in . . . no need to mess
with success and change the settings . . .
--Tock

July 10th 03, 03:41 AM
"Joyce" > wrote
> What top-loader did you get, Tock?
> Joyce


Some ancient Hotpoint . . . it's used, probably made back in the Roosevelt
administration, but it works great . . .for now, anyways. I figured out
how to make it wash with warm water, at a high water level, and on the "wash
and wear" cycle, and that's what I wash everything in . . . no need to mess
with success and change the settings . . .
--Tock

ChrisW
July 10th 03, 10:23 PM
Chris,

We have our dryer raised for this very reason (bad back). We have a top load
washer and the dryer is front load and raised. I built a wood platform for the
dryer. If I ever get a front load washer this will also be raised and I will
used cement block. I have seen several done this way and it works great.

ChrisW


chris wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
>
> Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> too cheap ?
>
> Thanks
> Chris

ChrisW
July 10th 03, 10:23 PM
Chris,

We have our dryer raised for this very reason (bad back). We have a top load
washer and the dryer is front load and raised. I built a wood platform for the
dryer. If I ever get a front load washer this will also be raised and I will
used cement block. I have seen several done this way and it works great.

ChrisW


chris wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> I am closing a new house in several months, and getting a new front
> loading washer and dryer. I have never own a washer dryer, so I have
> been shopping around. I notice that they sell a $300 platform to raise
> the washer and dryer. I thought it kinda expensive. So I am thinking
> if there is a cheaper way to built this by myself. I am thinking just
> to stack cinder blocks underneath. Problem is that I am not sure if
> this will be strong enough, and also, if these appliances will
> vibrate. I am not sure how heavy these appliances are...
>
> Has anyone did this ? Could you share some idea ? or am I just being
> too cheap ?
>
> Thanks
> Chris

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