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FRED WELLMAN
July 6th 03, 05:11 AM
I am helping my Aunt clean out her house, she is 63 and disabled. She is
giving many useful items to a charity. A few items worth selling she is
selling at a second hand store. She has a limited income and does not want
a hassle of selling her antiques. She mostly has carpenters tools from the
1930's and Ohio Auto pates from 1910 to the present with only a few years
missing. What is the best way to sell them and get a fair price. All help
is appreciated. Thank You Fred

Gary Heston
July 6th 03, 05:18 AM
In article >,
FRED WELLMAN > wrote:
>I am helping my Aunt clean out her house, she is 63 and disabled. She is
>giving many useful items to a charity. A few items worth selling she is
>selling at a second hand store. She has a limited income and does not want
>a hassle of selling her antiques. She mostly has carpenters tools from the
>1930's and Ohio Auto pates from 1910 to the present with only a few years
>missing. What is the best way to sell them and get a fair price. All help
>is appreciated. Thank You Fred

They've become a hassle for small sellers, but Ebay is probably your (and
her) best option.

What does she have in the way of carpenters' tools? I'm a sucker for tools...


Gary

--
Gary Heston
PHB: "That's the sort of leadership that will turn this company around."
Wally: "Were we doing well?"
Dilbert, 5/23/3

Gary Heston
July 6th 03, 05:18 AM
In article >,
FRED WELLMAN > wrote:
>I am helping my Aunt clean out her house, she is 63 and disabled. She is
>giving many useful items to a charity. A few items worth selling she is
>selling at a second hand store. She has a limited income and does not want
>a hassle of selling her antiques. She mostly has carpenters tools from the
>1930's and Ohio Auto pates from 1910 to the present with only a few years
>missing. What is the best way to sell them and get a fair price. All help
>is appreciated. Thank You Fred

They've become a hassle for small sellers, but Ebay is probably your (and
her) best option.

What does she have in the way of carpenters' tools? I'm a sucker for tools...


Gary

--
Gary Heston
PHB: "That's the sort of leadership that will turn this company around."
Wally: "Were we doing well?"
Dilbert, 5/23/3

Chloe
July 6th 03, 12:34 PM
"FRED WELLMAN" > wrote in message
...
> I am helping my Aunt clean out her house, she is 63 and disabled. She is
> giving many useful items to a charity. A few items worth selling she is
> selling at a second hand store. She has a limited income and does not
want
> a hassle of selling her antiques. She mostly has carpenters tools from
the
> 1930's and Ohio Auto pates from 1910 to the present with only a few years
> missing. What is the best way to sell them and get a fair price. All
help
> is appreciated. Thank You Fred

If she's in an area large enough to have an auction house, that's probably
the easiest way to get rid of the stuff at the best price. A good one will
advertise her items before hand, so that interested buyers will show up.

Otherwise she might ask some antique dealers if they're interested in buying
it. She'll get a lot less for it that way, but it'll be out of the house and
gone.

As others have suggested, you could always try eBay first, although that's
going to be more work than the other two options.

Chloe
July 6th 03, 12:34 PM
"FRED WELLMAN" > wrote in message
...
> I am helping my Aunt clean out her house, she is 63 and disabled. She is
> giving many useful items to a charity. A few items worth selling she is
> selling at a second hand store. She has a limited income and does not
want
> a hassle of selling her antiques. She mostly has carpenters tools from
the
> 1930's and Ohio Auto pates from 1910 to the present with only a few years
> missing. What is the best way to sell them and get a fair price. All
help
> is appreciated. Thank You Fred

If she's in an area large enough to have an auction house, that's probably
the easiest way to get rid of the stuff at the best price. A good one will
advertise her items before hand, so that interested buyers will show up.

Otherwise she might ask some antique dealers if they're interested in buying
it. She'll get a lot less for it that way, but it'll be out of the house and
gone.

As others have suggested, you could always try eBay first, although that's
going to be more work than the other two options.

Sue Sorensen
July 6th 03, 06:04 PM
Hi Fred,

I'm new to this group, but hope I have something to offer. I have
experience selling antiques both online and to local dealers. I found eBay
to be a lot of work for the amount of profit I could make, so after a while,
I quit and started selling my garage sale and thriftshop "finds" to local
antique shops instead.

The way I established some contact with local dealers was to go to their
shops and look around for items similar to what I had to sell. Then I just
started talking to them about what I had at home and they asked me to bring
the items in. It's a good idea to use eBay and other antique Websites to
get an idea of what your items might be worth. A dealer will not pay you
the full "retail" price, of course, since he/she wants to make a profit.

You might also look in your newspaper's classified ads and your yellow
pages, and see if there are any dealers that are willing to come out and
look at what you have and make an offer on the whole lot of items.

One final idea is to see if there are Websites that sell the same types of
items that your aunt has; then email the people who own those Websites and
see if they're interested in buying from you. I did this with a fellow who
buys and sells Corning Ware. It was a lot easier to send him a big box of
stuff, than to sell individual pieces on eBay.

Sue

"FRED WELLMAN" > wrote in message
...
> I am helping my Aunt clean out her house, she is 63 and disabled. She is
> giving many useful items to a charity. A few items worth selling she is
> selling at a second hand store. She has a limited income and does not
want
> a hassle of selling her antiques. She mostly has carpenters tools from
the
> 1930's and Ohio Auto pates from 1910 to the present with only a few years
> missing. What is the best way to sell them and get a fair price. All
help
> is appreciated. Thank You Fred
>
>
>

Sue Sorensen
July 6th 03, 06:04 PM
Hi Fred,

I'm new to this group, but hope I have something to offer. I have
experience selling antiques both online and to local dealers. I found eBay
to be a lot of work for the amount of profit I could make, so after a while,
I quit and started selling my garage sale and thriftshop "finds" to local
antique shops instead.

The way I established some contact with local dealers was to go to their
shops and look around for items similar to what I had to sell. Then I just
started talking to them about what I had at home and they asked me to bring
the items in. It's a good idea to use eBay and other antique Websites to
get an idea of what your items might be worth. A dealer will not pay you
the full "retail" price, of course, since he/she wants to make a profit.

You might also look in your newspaper's classified ads and your yellow
pages, and see if there are any dealers that are willing to come out and
look at what you have and make an offer on the whole lot of items.

One final idea is to see if there are Websites that sell the same types of
items that your aunt has; then email the people who own those Websites and
see if they're interested in buying from you. I did this with a fellow who
buys and sells Corning Ware. It was a lot easier to send him a big box of
stuff, than to sell individual pieces on eBay.

Sue

"FRED WELLMAN" > wrote in message
...
> I am helping my Aunt clean out her house, she is 63 and disabled. She is
> giving many useful items to a charity. A few items worth selling she is
> selling at a second hand store. She has a limited income and does not
want
> a hassle of selling her antiques. She mostly has carpenters tools from
the
> 1930's and Ohio Auto pates from 1910 to the present with only a few years
> missing. What is the best way to sell them and get a fair price. All
help
> is appreciated. Thank You Fred
>
>
>

FRED WELLMAN
July 6th 03, 09:58 PM
"Sue Sorensen" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Hi Fred,
>
> I'm new to this group, but hope I have something to offer. I have
> experience selling antiques both online and to local dealers. I found
eBay
> to be a lot of work for the amount of profit I could make, so after a
while,
> I quit and started selling my garage sale and thriftshop "finds" to local
> antique shops instead.
>
> The way I established some contact with local dealers was to go to their
> shops and look around for items similar to what I had to sell. Then I
just
> started talking to them about what I had at home and they asked me to
bring
> the items in. It's a good idea to use eBay and other antique Websites to
> get an idea of what your items might be worth. A dealer will not pay you
> the full "retail" price, of course, since he/she wants to make a profit.
>
> You might also look in your newspaper's classified ads and your yellow
> pages, and see if there are any dealers that are willing to come out and
> look at what you have and make an offer on the whole lot of items.
>
> One final idea is to see if there are Websites that sell the same types of
> items that your aunt has; then email the people who own those Websites and
> see if they're interested in buying from you. I did this with a fellow
who
> buys and sells Corning Ware. It was a lot easier to send him a big box of
> stuff, than to sell individual pieces on eBay.
>
> Sue
>
SNIPPED
Thanks for all of the answers. I now have a place to start. Fred

FRED WELLMAN
July 6th 03, 09:58 PM
"Sue Sorensen" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Hi Fred,
>
> I'm new to this group, but hope I have something to offer. I have
> experience selling antiques both online and to local dealers. I found
eBay
> to be a lot of work for the amount of profit I could make, so after a
while,
> I quit and started selling my garage sale and thriftshop "finds" to local
> antique shops instead.
>
> The way I established some contact with local dealers was to go to their
> shops and look around for items similar to what I had to sell. Then I
just
> started talking to them about what I had at home and they asked me to
bring
> the items in. It's a good idea to use eBay and other antique Websites to
> get an idea of what your items might be worth. A dealer will not pay you
> the full "retail" price, of course, since he/she wants to make a profit.
>
> You might also look in your newspaper's classified ads and your yellow
> pages, and see if there are any dealers that are willing to come out and
> look at what you have and make an offer on the whole lot of items.
>
> One final idea is to see if there are Websites that sell the same types of
> items that your aunt has; then email the people who own those Websites and
> see if they're interested in buying from you. I did this with a fellow
who
> buys and sells Corning Ware. It was a lot easier to send him a big box of
> stuff, than to sell individual pieces on eBay.
>
> Sue
>
SNIPPED
Thanks for all of the answers. I now have a place to start. Fred

Roseb441702
July 13th 03, 09:24 AM
>>I am helping my Aunt clean out her house, she is 63 and disabled. She is
>>giving many useful items to a charity. A few items worth selling she is

>What is the best way to sell them and get a fair price. All help
>>is appreciated. Thank You Fred
>

Ebay!


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Roseb441702
July 13th 03, 09:24 AM
>>I am helping my Aunt clean out her house, she is 63 and disabled. She is
>>giving many useful items to a charity. A few items worth selling she is

>What is the best way to sell them and get a fair price. All help
>>is appreciated. Thank You Fred
>

Ebay!


***************************************
"Give A ShoutOut To The World!"
Put Your Voice Message Online at:
The ShoutOut Page
http://members.aol.com/Roseb441702/shoutout.htm

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