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View Full Version : Re: Morning Glories - High 'Wow! Factor'


Albert Wagner
July 6th 03, 03:40 PM
On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 19:31:59 GMT
wrote:

> They are great flowers... although the ones we planted several years
> ago went to seed, and now every spring MG sprout _everywhere_.
> We pull up most of them, but some of the volunteers are left in good
> spots.
>
> I guess they are frugal, we'll probably never have to buy those seeds
> again... ;-)
>

Related to morning glories are moonflowers. Have you tried them too?
They bloom at night and fill the air with perfume. My grandmother had
moonflowers growing up a dead tree. In the evenings we would sit around
the tree and watch the moonflowers opening. They do it rather quickly.
Great fun for kids. (But then maybe I was easily entertained :)

Albert Wagner
July 6th 03, 03:40 PM
On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 19:31:59 GMT
wrote:

> They are great flowers... although the ones we planted several years
> ago went to seed, and now every spring MG sprout _everywhere_.
> We pull up most of them, but some of the volunteers are left in good
> spots.
>
> I guess they are frugal, we'll probably never have to buy those seeds
> again... ;-)
>

Related to morning glories are moonflowers. Have you tried them too?
They bloom at night and fill the air with perfume. My grandmother had
moonflowers growing up a dead tree. In the evenings we would sit around
the tree and watch the moonflowers opening. They do it rather quickly.
Great fun for kids. (But then maybe I was easily entertained :)

Albert Wagner
July 6th 03, 09:25 PM
On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 00:31:10 -0000
(Gary Heston) wrote:
<snip>
> The only difference between the culitvated ones and the wild
> ones is whether or not you paid for them. :-)

Not true. The flowers of the wild plant are 1-2" across. The flowers
of the cultivated variety are 4-5" across.

<snip>
> The ones infesting my garden and flowerbeds have seed pods
> about the size of a hazelnut, containing several seeds about
> 1/16" in diameter. No sanding or soaking needed.

Seeds of the cultivated variety are about 1/2" in diameter.

<snip>

Albert Wagner
July 6th 03, 09:25 PM
On Mon, 07 Jul 2003 00:31:10 -0000
(Gary Heston) wrote:
<snip>
> The only difference between the culitvated ones and the wild
> ones is whether or not you paid for them. :-)

Not true. The flowers of the wild plant are 1-2" across. The flowers
of the cultivated variety are 4-5" across.

<snip>
> The ones infesting my garden and flowerbeds have seed pods
> about the size of a hazelnut, containing several seeds about
> 1/16" in diameter. No sanding or soaking needed.

Seeds of the cultivated variety are about 1/2" in diameter.

<snip>

The Real Bev
July 6th 03, 11:14 PM
Pat Meadows wrote:
>
> On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 19:31:59 GMT, wrote:
>
> >They are great flowers... although the ones we planted several years
> >ago went to seed, and now every spring MG sprout _everywhere_.
> >We pull up most of them, but some of the volunteers are left in good
> >spots.
> >
> >I guess they are frugal, we'll probably never have to buy those seeds
> >again... ;-)
>
> This has NEVER happened to me, I wish it would. Where do
> you live? (Roughly.)
>
> I suspect this may happen in warmer climates than ours.

Like SoCal. Fast growth, beautiful flowers (I love the blue ones),
prolific seed...and then you get a freeze (not often, but it does happen)
and you suddenly have a bale of brown ugly stuff twined around whatever it
was twined around. I pulled the seedlings up by hand for several years
before they were all gone.

OTOH, a friend has neighborhood morning glories, growing over everything
they possibly can for years and years and years. They die, but are then
covered by new green vines. The Kudzu of the West.

I think they'd make a nice ground cover in a restricted area. Beautiful
until they freeze, and then you can just rake up and dispose of the
corpses and start over.

--
Cheers,
Bev
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"If you see me running, try to keep up."
...Back of bomb technician's shirt

The Real Bev
July 6th 03, 11:14 PM
Pat Meadows wrote:
>
> On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 19:31:59 GMT, wrote:
>
> >They are great flowers... although the ones we planted several years
> >ago went to seed, and now every spring MG sprout _everywhere_.
> >We pull up most of them, but some of the volunteers are left in good
> >spots.
> >
> >I guess they are frugal, we'll probably never have to buy those seeds
> >again... ;-)
>
> This has NEVER happened to me, I wish it would. Where do
> you live? (Roughly.)
>
> I suspect this may happen in warmer climates than ours.

Like SoCal. Fast growth, beautiful flowers (I love the blue ones),
prolific seed...and then you get a freeze (not often, but it does happen)
and you suddenly have a bale of brown ugly stuff twined around whatever it
was twined around. I pulled the seedlings up by hand for several years
before they were all gone.

OTOH, a friend has neighborhood morning glories, growing over everything
they possibly can for years and years and years. They die, but are then
covered by new green vines. The Kudzu of the West.

I think they'd make a nice ground cover in a restricted area. Beautiful
until they freeze, and then you can just rake up and dispose of the
corpses and start over.

--
Cheers,
Bev
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"If you see me running, try to keep up."
...Back of bomb technician's shirt

The Real Bev
July 7th 03, 03:05 AM
Gary Heston wrote:

> The ones infesting my garden and flowerbeds have seed pods
> about the size of a hazelnut, containing several seeds about
> 1/16" in diameter. No sanding or soaking needed.
>
> They'll reseed themselves very rapidly; you really don't need
> to save Morning Glory seeds. They're the only plant I know of
> which outgrows kudzu.

I like the Brit name for one type: bindweed.

--
Cheers, Bev
================================================== ============
"Arguing on the internet is like running a race in the Special
Olympics: even if you win, you're still retarded."

The Real Bev
July 7th 03, 03:05 AM
Gary Heston wrote:

> The ones infesting my garden and flowerbeds have seed pods
> about the size of a hazelnut, containing several seeds about
> 1/16" in diameter. No sanding or soaking needed.
>
> They'll reseed themselves very rapidly; you really don't need
> to save Morning Glory seeds. They're the only plant I know of
> which outgrows kudzu.

I like the Brit name for one type: bindweed.

--
Cheers, Bev
================================================== ============
"Arguing on the internet is like running a race in the Special
Olympics: even if you win, you're still retarded."

Michael Black
July 7th 03, 03:35 AM
Gary Heston ) writes:
> In article >,
> Pat Meadows > wrote:
>
>
>
>>(Warning: I believe all parts of morning glories are
>>poisonous so they are NOT a good choice for people with
>>small children.)
>
> Also reputed to be hallucinogenic, but I've never checked.
> I value my brain, and would like to keep it reasonably
> intact.
>
I can't find it in "Steal this Book", which is where I thought
I'd read it, but I thought the common seeds sold for planting
were treated so people would not ingest them. They'd be wanting
to ingest them because they are hallucinogenic.

Michael

Michael Black
July 7th 03, 03:35 AM
Gary Heston ) writes:
> In article >,
> Pat Meadows > wrote:
>
>
>
>>(Warning: I believe all parts of morning glories are
>>poisonous so they are NOT a good choice for people with
>>small children.)
>
> Also reputed to be hallucinogenic, but I've never checked.
> I value my brain, and would like to keep it reasonably
> intact.
>
I can't find it in "Steal this Book", which is where I thought
I'd read it, but I thought the common seeds sold for planting
were treated so people would not ingest them. They'd be wanting
to ingest them because they are hallucinogenic.

Michael

Tracey
July 7th 03, 06:21 AM
Pat Meadows wrote:

> On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 19:31:59 GMT, wrote:
>
>>They are great flowers... although the ones we planted several years
>>ago went to seed, and now every spring MG sprout _everywhere_.
>>We pull up most of them, but some of the volunteers are left in good
>>spots.
>>
>>I guess they are frugal, we'll probably never have to buy those seeds
>>again... ;-)
>
> This has NEVER happened to me, I wish it would. Where do
> you live? (Roughly.)
>
> I suspect this may happen in warmer climates than ours.
>
> Pat

Pat,
Nope, not just warmer climates than yours. Well, at least I think our
climates are comparable - I'm in central CT, we're only about 15 miles
inland though, so maybe that does make it a bit warmer than where you are.
Just yesterday, I pulled out about 2 garbage pails worth of morning glory
plants from a section of my perennial garden about 10' X 20' and I didn't
even get them all. The darn things will probably have grown back within a
couple of weeks. I just can't seem to get rid of them, no matter how hard
I try. The vines get all twisted round and round and over everything to the
point that my other plants are getting choked by them.
I'm chuckling over the comment about the morning glories being like Kudzu
because I was thinking the exact same thing while I was ripping it out.

Tracey in CT

Tracey
July 7th 03, 06:21 AM
Pat Meadows wrote:

> On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 19:31:59 GMT, wrote:
>
>>They are great flowers... although the ones we planted several years
>>ago went to seed, and now every spring MG sprout _everywhere_.
>>We pull up most of them, but some of the volunteers are left in good
>>spots.
>>
>>I guess they are frugal, we'll probably never have to buy those seeds
>>again... ;-)
>
> This has NEVER happened to me, I wish it would. Where do
> you live? (Roughly.)
>
> I suspect this may happen in warmer climates than ours.
>
> Pat

Pat,
Nope, not just warmer climates than yours. Well, at least I think our
climates are comparable - I'm in central CT, we're only about 15 miles
inland though, so maybe that does make it a bit warmer than where you are.
Just yesterday, I pulled out about 2 garbage pails worth of morning glory
plants from a section of my perennial garden about 10' X 20' and I didn't
even get them all. The darn things will probably have grown back within a
couple of weeks. I just can't seem to get rid of them, no matter how hard
I try. The vines get all twisted round and round and over everything to the
point that my other plants are getting choked by them.
I'm chuckling over the comment about the morning glories being like Kudzu
because I was thinking the exact same thing while I was ripping it out.

Tracey in CT

Tsu Dho Poster
July 7th 03, 04:21 PM
"Derald Martin" > wrote in message
...
> The Real Bev > wrote:
>
> >I seem to remember reading that the seeds contained such a small amount
of
> >whatever magic chemical they were reputed to contain that there was no
> >point in bothering.
> Well, the magic chemicals are opiates. Certain sub-species "morning
> glory) are commonly used by herbalists. Dunno why the dopers never
> really took to it, though.
> --

Not worth the trouble. Contains LSA, similar to LSD, but has only a tiny
fraction of the potency of LSD. You'd have to take a handful of m/g seeds.
Then you'd risk nausea & other unpleasentries. One workaround is soak seeds
in Coleman's lamp oil or lighter fluid (for real) (lol). Another is to take
some ginger, prevent upset stomach, nausea (?)

For a frugal high, try Jesus.......
(if that doesn't work, there's always Hawaiian baby wodrose seeds, only need
about 0.74 grams for the LSD effect ) <wink>

http://www.erowid.org/plants/morning_glory/morning_glory_info2.shtml

Tsu Dho Poster
July 7th 03, 04:21 PM
"Derald Martin" > wrote in message
...
> The Real Bev > wrote:
>
> >I seem to remember reading that the seeds contained such a small amount
of
> >whatever magic chemical they were reputed to contain that there was no
> >point in bothering.
> Well, the magic chemicals are opiates. Certain sub-species "morning
> glory) are commonly used by herbalists. Dunno why the dopers never
> really took to it, though.
> --

Not worth the trouble. Contains LSA, similar to LSD, but has only a tiny
fraction of the potency of LSD. You'd have to take a handful of m/g seeds.
Then you'd risk nausea & other unpleasentries. One workaround is soak seeds
in Coleman's lamp oil or lighter fluid (for real) (lol). Another is to take
some ginger, prevent upset stomach, nausea (?)

For a frugal high, try Jesus.......
(if that doesn't work, there's always Hawaiian baby wodrose seeds, only need
about 0.74 grams for the LSD effect ) <wink>

http://www.erowid.org/plants/morning_glory/morning_glory_info2.shtml

Tsu Dho Poster
July 7th 03, 04:46 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message news:
>
> (Warning: I believe all parts of morning glories are
> poisonous so they are NOT a good choice for people with
> small children.)

Otoh, they'd be a good choice if you wanted to get rid of them.......the
rugrats, that is.

>They give good value for the money and minimal
> effort required, IMHO.

Oh, right..."minimum effort"......then you follow with a dozen more
paragraphs explaining how to do it...:-)

>>And FAST - they grow quickly.

How quickly...I wana see em climb a rope to my big window upstairs. ??

> http://plantsdatabase.com/go/31977/
> Above are pictures of the Heavenly Blue, although pictures
> don't really do it justice. The Heavenly Blue is a clear,
> pure blue:

Just like my Heavenly Blue eyes......

> they have a very high 'Wow! factor' because of the
> gorgeous colors in the blossoms - they seem to glow from
> within.

or you could just chew on some coca leaves...

Tsu Dho Poster
July 7th 03, 04:46 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message news:
>
> (Warning: I believe all parts of morning glories are
> poisonous so they are NOT a good choice for people with
> small children.)

Otoh, they'd be a good choice if you wanted to get rid of them.......the
rugrats, that is.

>They give good value for the money and minimal
> effort required, IMHO.

Oh, right..."minimum effort"......then you follow with a dozen more
paragraphs explaining how to do it...:-)

>>And FAST - they grow quickly.

How quickly...I wana see em climb a rope to my big window upstairs. ??

> http://plantsdatabase.com/go/31977/
> Above are pictures of the Heavenly Blue, although pictures
> don't really do it justice. The Heavenly Blue is a clear,
> pure blue:

Just like my Heavenly Blue eyes......

> they have a very high 'Wow! factor' because of the
> gorgeous colors in the blossoms - they seem to glow from
> within.

or you could just chew on some coca leaves...

Heather Jones
July 7th 03, 08:36 PM
Dude! It wasn't me! It was Pat Meadows who wrote:
: Yes, I've had them. I think you mean daturas?
: http://www.thompson-morgan.com/seeds/us/list_d_2.html (click
: on the little picture to see it larger, and get more
: description)

Thank you! I have a datura (of some variety) that was given to me by a
friend a few years ago, but she only knew it as a "moonplant", so I
didn't have a clue it was datura. It has come back again and again (I
can break it off at the ground every year, and the next spring the same
plant comes back again) and reseeded itself elsewhere so much that we
were very frustrated with it until I started keeping on top of
collecting the seedpods (with gloves, ouch) before they opened. We're
in zone 7, I believe.

--heather

--
Heather Jones heather_jones(at)pobox(dot)com
http://www.haphazard.org http://hap.livejournal.com

Heather Jones
July 7th 03, 08:36 PM
Dude! It wasn't me! It was Pat Meadows who wrote:
: Yes, I've had them. I think you mean daturas?
: http://www.thompson-morgan.com/seeds/us/list_d_2.html (click
: on the little picture to see it larger, and get more
: description)

Thank you! I have a datura (of some variety) that was given to me by a
friend a few years ago, but she only knew it as a "moonplant", so I
didn't have a clue it was datura. It has come back again and again (I
can break it off at the ground every year, and the next spring the same
plant comes back again) and reseeded itself elsewhere so much that we
were very frustrated with it until I started keeping on top of
collecting the seedpods (with gloves, ouch) before they opened. We're
in zone 7, I believe.

--heather

--
Heather Jones heather_jones(at)pobox(dot)com
http://www.haphazard.org http://hap.livejournal.com

Tom Swiss
July 11th 03, 03:09 AM
The Real Bev > wrote:

>I seem to remember reading that the seeds contained such a small amount of
>whatever magic chemical they were reputed to contain that there was no
>point in bothering.

It takes a bunch, but you can get a psychedelic effect. (Never tried
it myself). The "Hawaiian Baby Woodrose" variety is supposed to have the
highest concentation. Some more information at

http://www.erowid.org/plants/hbw/hbw.shtml

Derald Martin > writes:
>
> Well, the magic chemicals are opiates.

No, they aren't. LSA - lysergic acid amide, related to LSD but much
weaker.

===Tom Swiss/tms(at)infamous.net===http://www.infamous.net==="Born to die"===
"What's so funny about peace, love, and understanding?" - Nick Lowe
"To be in love is merely to be in a state of perpetual anesthesia - to
mistake an ordinary young woman for a goddess." -- H. L. Mencken

Tom Swiss
July 11th 03, 03:09 AM
The Real Bev > wrote:

>I seem to remember reading that the seeds contained such a small amount of
>whatever magic chemical they were reputed to contain that there was no
>point in bothering.

It takes a bunch, but you can get a psychedelic effect. (Never tried
it myself). The "Hawaiian Baby Woodrose" variety is supposed to have the
highest concentation. Some more information at

http://www.erowid.org/plants/hbw/hbw.shtml

Derald Martin > writes:
>
> Well, the magic chemicals are opiates.

No, they aren't. LSA - lysergic acid amide, related to LSD but much
weaker.

===Tom Swiss/tms(at)infamous.net===http://www.infamous.net==="Born to die"===
"What's so funny about peace, love, and understanding?" - Nick Lowe
"To be in love is merely to be in a state of perpetual anesthesia - to
mistake an ordinary young woman for a goddess." -- H. L. Mencken

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