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July 6th 03, 10:23 PM
How many others are shocked and awed by the masterful stroke of marketing
genius at Kraft, which has promised to reduce portion sizes to make us
healthier. No mention is made of reducing prices to make our wallets
healthier.

Watch as other companies fly to this aerie of increased profits above consumer
reproach.

Don K
July 6th 03, 10:44 PM
> wrote in message
...
> How many others are shocked and awed by the masterful stroke of marketing
> genius at Kraft, which has promised to reduce portion sizes to make us
> healthier. No mention is made of reducing prices to make our wallets
> healthier.
>
> Watch as other companies fly to this aerie of increased profits above
consumer
> reproach.

Nice metaphor.

Don

Don K
July 6th 03, 10:44 PM
> wrote in message
...
> How many others are shocked and awed by the masterful stroke of marketing
> genius at Kraft, which has promised to reduce portion sizes to make us
> healthier. No mention is made of reducing prices to make our wallets
> healthier.
>
> Watch as other companies fly to this aerie of increased profits above
consumer
> reproach.

Nice metaphor.

Don

Halcitron
July 7th 03, 07:10 AM
>From:
>Newsgroups: misc.consumers.frugal-living
>Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2003 20:23:20 GMT

>
>How many others are shocked and awed by the masterful stroke of marketing
>genius at Kraft, which has promised to reduce portion sizes to make us
>healthier. No mention is made of reducing prices to make our wallets
>healthier.
>
>Watch as other companies fly to this aerie of increased profits above
>consumer
>reproach.

I recent years their strategy has been to reduce size, while maintaining price.
Or there would be a new size with a new price.

I am waiting to see what they doo next.


caveat lector

Halcitron misc.survivalism
Check your six and know when to duck.
NRA Member since 2002
The Law of the Land, is the weapon in your hand.

Smith & Wesson starts where the Bill of Rights stop.

Halcitron
July 7th 03, 07:10 AM
>From:
>Newsgroups: misc.consumers.frugal-living
>Date: Sun, 06 Jul 2003 20:23:20 GMT

>
>How many others are shocked and awed by the masterful stroke of marketing
>genius at Kraft, which has promised to reduce portion sizes to make us
>healthier. No mention is made of reducing prices to make our wallets
>healthier.
>
>Watch as other companies fly to this aerie of increased profits above
>consumer
>reproach.

I recent years their strategy has been to reduce size, while maintaining price.
Or there would be a new size with a new price.

I am waiting to see what they doo next.


caveat lector

Halcitron misc.survivalism
Check your six and know when to duck.
NRA Member since 2002
The Law of the Land, is the weapon in your hand.

Smith & Wesson starts where the Bill of Rights stop.

Tsu Dho Poster
July 7th 03, 05:14 PM
> wrote in message
...

> How many others are shocked and awed by the masterful stroke of marketing
> genius at Kraft, which has promised to reduce portion sizes to make us
> healthier.

I saw a brief article on this on the BBC site. They claim they're going to
promote healthier eating. Guess that means they won't be promoting their own
products ...??
It's a start....reducing portions...

>>No mention is made of reducing prices to make our wallets healthier.

Of course not....remember they're thinking of your health. So, by keeping
the same prices for smaller portions, some might choose not to buy....so
they'd be improving the health of the non-buyer....

Tsu Dho Poster
July 7th 03, 05:14 PM
> wrote in message
...

> How many others are shocked and awed by the masterful stroke of marketing
> genius at Kraft, which has promised to reduce portion sizes to make us
> healthier.

I saw a brief article on this on the BBC site. They claim they're going to
promote healthier eating. Guess that means they won't be promoting their own
products ...??
It's a start....reducing portions...

>>No mention is made of reducing prices to make our wallets healthier.

Of course not....remember they're thinking of your health. So, by keeping
the same prices for smaller portions, some might choose not to buy....so
they'd be improving the health of the non-buyer....

SlinkyToy
July 7th 03, 05:41 PM
Well, not only is this whole "approach to healthy eating" nonsensical, it
won't really have any effect on overeaters. It will, however (as pointed
out) increase corporate profits AND give the junk food makers a shield to
hide behind. They'll be able to say "but look, or label clearly says one
serving of these pure-fat-with-sugar-frosting cookies is but ONE COOKIE!
How can it be OUR fault if Mr. Fat Consumer ate the entire package of TWENTY
cookies at one sitting and then died of a massive CI???" When Mr. FC's
family comes after the cookie maker for damages.

This is also a knee-jerk reaction on the part of the processed food
manufacturers to the proposed Junk Food Tax. Or so it seems to me. If they
(the food mfgs) are proactive with this new labelling they might be able to
"persuade" the congresscritters that such a tax is unnecessary.

> wrote in message
...
> How many others are shocked and awed by the masterful stroke of marketing
> genius at Kraft, which has promised to reduce portion sizes to make us
> healthier. No mention is made of reducing prices to make our wallets
> healthier.
>
> Watch as other companies fly to this aerie of increased profits above
consumer
> reproach.
>

SlinkyToy
July 7th 03, 05:41 PM
Well, not only is this whole "approach to healthy eating" nonsensical, it
won't really have any effect on overeaters. It will, however (as pointed
out) increase corporate profits AND give the junk food makers a shield to
hide behind. They'll be able to say "but look, or label clearly says one
serving of these pure-fat-with-sugar-frosting cookies is but ONE COOKIE!
How can it be OUR fault if Mr. Fat Consumer ate the entire package of TWENTY
cookies at one sitting and then died of a massive CI???" When Mr. FC's
family comes after the cookie maker for damages.

This is also a knee-jerk reaction on the part of the processed food
manufacturers to the proposed Junk Food Tax. Or so it seems to me. If they
(the food mfgs) are proactive with this new labelling they might be able to
"persuade" the congresscritters that such a tax is unnecessary.

> wrote in message
...
> How many others are shocked and awed by the masterful stroke of marketing
> genius at Kraft, which has promised to reduce portion sizes to make us
> healthier. No mention is made of reducing prices to make our wallets
> healthier.
>
> Watch as other companies fly to this aerie of increased profits above
consumer
> reproach.
>

Dennis
July 7th 03, 06:35 PM
On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 20:23:20 GMT, wrote:

>How many others are shocked and awed by the masterful stroke of marketing
>genius at Kraft, which has promised to reduce portion sizes to make us
>healthier.

Who says big business doesn't care?

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

Dennis
July 7th 03, 06:35 PM
On Sun, 06 Jul 2003 20:23:20 GMT, wrote:

>How many others are shocked and awed by the masterful stroke of marketing
>genius at Kraft, which has promised to reduce portion sizes to make us
>healthier.

Who says big business doesn't care?

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

SlinkyToy
July 7th 03, 08:10 PM
Just half a Twinkie?
Is this the New and Improved Smaller Twinkie, or is it leftover from last
night?

*g*


"Tsu Dho Poster" > wrote in message
...
>
> <Jon K>
> (munching on a half-twinkie)
>
>

SlinkyToy
July 7th 03, 08:10 PM
Just half a Twinkie?
Is this the New and Improved Smaller Twinkie, or is it leftover from last
night?

*g*


"Tsu Dho Poster" > wrote in message
...
>
> <Jon K>
> (munching on a half-twinkie)
>
>

ben121
July 10th 03, 05:33 AM
I certalinly hope that they never pass any fat taxes. I think the
food industry is being very proactive and that is a good thing. IMHO,
they should be able to serve chocolate covered lard if they want to,
but that is not the way the world works. For some reason, there are
too many people who cannot or will not think for themselves (and
realize that chocolate covered lard is unhealthy, and should be eaten
very rarely) These congresmen are simply trying to fatten their
pockets with all of this, and the food companies are trying to beat
them to the punch. I canot blame them for this, it is our own fault
for not exersizing more, and then trying to blame them for your flabby
belly and fat butt.

ben121
July 10th 03, 05:33 AM
I certalinly hope that they never pass any fat taxes. I think the
food industry is being very proactive and that is a good thing. IMHO,
they should be able to serve chocolate covered lard if they want to,
but that is not the way the world works. For some reason, there are
too many people who cannot or will not think for themselves (and
realize that chocolate covered lard is unhealthy, and should be eaten
very rarely) These congresmen are simply trying to fatten their
pockets with all of this, and the food companies are trying to beat
them to the punch. I canot blame them for this, it is our own fault
for not exersizing more, and then trying to blame them for your flabby
belly and fat butt.

ben121
July 11th 03, 12:11 AM
"SoCalMike" > wrote in message news:<%[email protected]>...
> "ben121" > wrote in message
> om...
> > I certalinly hope that they never pass any fat taxes. I think the
> > food industry is being very proactive and that is a good thing. IMHO,
> > they should be able to serve chocolate covered lard if they want to,
> > but that is not the way the world works
>
> they sell what is cheap. go to the store- whats the cheapest stuff you can
> buy?
>
> water
> sugars
> starches, like potatos, rice, and flour
>
> fat is actually kinda expensive, since it comes from animals and theres more
> processing involved.



umm, i think vegetables are the cheapest things you can buy.... and
the best things for you. people just choose not to purchase
vegetables, so you say that the government should take away that
choice........ i think the companies that make the foods preferred by
consumers have every right to sell them... people DO have a choice,
and they should continue to have one.

ben121
July 11th 03, 12:11 AM
"SoCalMike" > wrote in message news:<%[email protected]>...
> "ben121" > wrote in message
> om...
> > I certalinly hope that they never pass any fat taxes. I think the
> > food industry is being very proactive and that is a good thing. IMHO,
> > they should be able to serve chocolate covered lard if they want to,
> > but that is not the way the world works
>
> they sell what is cheap. go to the store- whats the cheapest stuff you can
> buy?
>
> water
> sugars
> starches, like potatos, rice, and flour
>
> fat is actually kinda expensive, since it comes from animals and theres more
> processing involved.



umm, i think vegetables are the cheapest things you can buy.... and
the best things for you. people just choose not to purchase
vegetables, so you say that the government should take away that
choice........ i think the companies that make the foods preferred by
consumers have every right to sell them... people DO have a choice,
and they should continue to have one.

SoCalMike
July 11th 03, 05:12 AM
"ben121" > wrote in message
om...
> "SoCalMike" > wrote in message
news:<%[email protected]>...
> > "ben121" > wrote in message
> > om...
> > > I certalinly hope that they never pass any fat taxes. I think the
> > > food industry is being very proactive and that is a good thing. IMHO,
> > > they should be able to serve chocolate covered lard if they want to,
> > > but that is not the way the world works
> >
> > they sell what is cheap. go to the store- whats the cheapest stuff you
can
> > buy?
> >
> > water
> > sugars
> > starches, like potatos, rice, and flour
> >
> > fat is actually kinda expensive, since it comes from animals and theres
more
> > processing involved.
>
>
>
> umm, i think vegetables are the cheapest things you can buy.... and

nope. pound for pound, starches are cheaper.

> the best things for you. people just choose not to purchase
> vegetables, so you say that the government should take away that
> choice........ i think the companies that make the foods preferred by
> consumers have every right to sell them... people DO have a choice,
> and they should continue to have one.

pretty much. thats why i rarely eat fast food.

SoCalMike
July 11th 03, 05:12 AM
"ben121" > wrote in message
om...
> "SoCalMike" > wrote in message
news:<%[email protected]>...
> > "ben121" > wrote in message
> > om...
> > > I certalinly hope that they never pass any fat taxes. I think the
> > > food industry is being very proactive and that is a good thing. IMHO,
> > > they should be able to serve chocolate covered lard if they want to,
> > > but that is not the way the world works
> >
> > they sell what is cheap. go to the store- whats the cheapest stuff you
can
> > buy?
> >
> > water
> > sugars
> > starches, like potatos, rice, and flour
> >
> > fat is actually kinda expensive, since it comes from animals and theres
more
> > processing involved.
>
>
>
> umm, i think vegetables are the cheapest things you can buy.... and

nope. pound for pound, starches are cheaper.

> the best things for you. people just choose not to purchase
> vegetables, so you say that the government should take away that
> choice........ i think the companies that make the foods preferred by
> consumers have every right to sell them... people DO have a choice,
> and they should continue to have one.

pretty much. thats why i rarely eat fast food.

Nina
July 11th 03, 06:48 AM
"Karen Wheless" > wrote in message
news:1fxwgmz.1j6rkfxf13fbmN%[email protected] net...
> > umm, i think vegetables are the cheapest things you can buy.... and
> > the best things for you.
>
> I'll agree that they're good for you - but cheapest you can buy? I
> can't imagine that - vegetables are the most expensive part of my
> budget. This varies depending on where you live, but I just went to a
> roadside stand and paid $2.99 per pound for in-season tomatoes. That
> was the cheapest I could find. By comparison, I can buy several kinds
> of meat for $1 per pound. With the occasional exception of bananas and
> maybe potatoes on sale, I don't think I've seen any vegetables for less
> than $1 per pound. Even the frozen ones cost more than that.
>
> Karen
Where do you live??

Nina
July 11th 03, 06:48 AM
"Karen Wheless" > wrote in message
news:1fxwgmz.1j6rkfxf13fbmN%[email protected] net...
> > umm, i think vegetables are the cheapest things you can buy.... and
> > the best things for you.
>
> I'll agree that they're good for you - but cheapest you can buy? I
> can't imagine that - vegetables are the most expensive part of my
> budget. This varies depending on where you live, but I just went to a
> roadside stand and paid $2.99 per pound for in-season tomatoes. That
> was the cheapest I could find. By comparison, I can buy several kinds
> of meat for $1 per pound. With the occasional exception of bananas and
> maybe potatoes on sale, I don't think I've seen any vegetables for less
> than $1 per pound. Even the frozen ones cost more than that.
>
> Karen
Where do you live??

July 11th 03, 09:49 PM
>What to do with the cabbage when you
>get it?

Shredded cabbage is a great base for salads, especially when lettuce is
expensive. Plus it keeps a lot longer in the fridge. Add some to
veggie soup too.

Try using shredded cabbage instead of lettuce in a taco, surprisingly
good. One particularly yummy combo is refried black beans, strips of
grilled chicken, shredded cabbage, cheese and sour cream.

Diva

July 11th 03, 09:49 PM
>What to do with the cabbage when you
>get it?

Shredded cabbage is a great base for salads, especially when lettuce is
expensive. Plus it keeps a lot longer in the fridge. Add some to
veggie soup too.

Try using shredded cabbage instead of lettuce in a taco, surprisingly
good. One particularly yummy combo is refried black beans, strips of
grilled chicken, shredded cabbage, cheese and sour cream.

Diva

Karen Wheless
July 12th 03, 01:25 AM
> Do you have any Asian or other 'ethnic' markets within
> reach? We buy fruit and veg at either our Chinese or
> Vietnamese markets. Much cheaper than any of the
> supermarkets and it's very good quality; mostly from
> California. Not that I know what to do with 10 kinds of
> mint, but nice to have it handy.

One opened about 20 miles away, I will have to go over there someday and
see what they have.

There is an Indian market right in my small town, but I was very
disappointed. They had almost nothing except cigarettes and some foods
imported from India, and it was a very creepy place. The two men who
were working there kept staring at me, I'd move into another aisle and
they'd both move so they could stare at me. I was so creeped out that I
left without buying anything. I couldn't figure it out, did they think
I was going to run past both of them with curry powder in my pants?

Karen

Karen Wheless
July 12th 03, 01:25 AM
> Do you have any Asian or other 'ethnic' markets within
> reach? We buy fruit and veg at either our Chinese or
> Vietnamese markets. Much cheaper than any of the
> supermarkets and it's very good quality; mostly from
> California. Not that I know what to do with 10 kinds of
> mint, but nice to have it handy.

One opened about 20 miles away, I will have to go over there someday and
see what they have.

There is an Indian market right in my small town, but I was very
disappointed. They had almost nothing except cigarettes and some foods
imported from India, and it was a very creepy place. The two men who
were working there kept staring at me, I'd move into another aisle and
they'd both move so they could stare at me. I was so creeped out that I
left without buying anything. I couldn't figure it out, did they think
I was going to run past both of them with curry powder in my pants?

Karen

Arri London
July 12th 03, 02:42 AM
Karen Wheless wrote:
>
> > Do you have any Asian or other 'ethnic' markets within
> > reach? We buy fruit and veg at either our Chinese or
> > Vietnamese markets. Much cheaper than any of the
> > supermarkets and it's very good quality; mostly from
> > California. Not that I know what to do with 10 kinds of
> > mint, but nice to have it handy.
>
> One opened about 20 miles away, I will have to go over there someday and
> see what they have.
>
> There is an Indian market right in my small town, but I was very
> disappointed. They had almost nothing except cigarettes and some foods
> imported from India, and it was a very creepy place. The two men who
> were working there kept staring at me, I'd move into another aisle and
> they'd both move so they could stare at me. I was so creeped out that I
> left without buying anything. I couldn't figure it out, did they think
> I was going to run past both of them with curry powder in my pants?
>
> Karen

Ah yes... used to get that in some Bengali groceries in
London, away from my neighbourhood. There is often an
inherent distrust of 'outsiders'.

Arri London
July 12th 03, 02:42 AM
Karen Wheless wrote:
>
> > Do you have any Asian or other 'ethnic' markets within
> > reach? We buy fruit and veg at either our Chinese or
> > Vietnamese markets. Much cheaper than any of the
> > supermarkets and it's very good quality; mostly from
> > California. Not that I know what to do with 10 kinds of
> > mint, but nice to have it handy.
>
> One opened about 20 miles away, I will have to go over there someday and
> see what they have.
>
> There is an Indian market right in my small town, but I was very
> disappointed. They had almost nothing except cigarettes and some foods
> imported from India, and it was a very creepy place. The two men who
> were working there kept staring at me, I'd move into another aisle and
> they'd both move so they could stare at me. I was so creeped out that I
> left without buying anything. I couldn't figure it out, did they think
> I was going to run past both of them with curry powder in my pants?
>
> Karen

Ah yes... used to get that in some Bengali groceries in
London, away from my neighbourhood. There is often an
inherent distrust of 'outsiders'.

The Real Bev
July 12th 03, 03:21 AM
Arri London wrote:

> Not that I know what to do with 10 kinds of
> mint, but nice to have it handy.

I didn't know there were that many kinds of mint, but the one my kids gave
me from their new house grows like a weed via blown seeds or underground
roots. Stick it somewhere it will get watered regularly and it's happy.

I was amazed at the number of varieties of bok choi.

--
Cheers, Bev
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
"I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we could to protect
our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security."
--Microsoft VP in charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.

The Real Bev
July 12th 03, 03:21 AM
Arri London wrote:

> Not that I know what to do with 10 kinds of
> mint, but nice to have it handy.

I didn't know there were that many kinds of mint, but the one my kids gave
me from their new house grows like a weed via blown seeds or underground
roots. Stick it somewhere it will get watered regularly and it's happy.

I was amazed at the number of varieties of bok choi.

--
Cheers, Bev
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
"I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we could to protect
our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security."
--Microsoft VP in charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.

The Real Bev
July 12th 03, 03:24 AM
Karen Wheless wrote:
>
> > Do you have any Asian or other 'ethnic' markets within
> > reach? We buy fruit and veg at either our Chinese or
> > Vietnamese markets. Much cheaper than any of the
> > supermarkets and it's very good quality; mostly from
> > California. Not that I know what to do with 10 kinds of
> > mint, but nice to have it handy.
>
> One opened about 20 miles away, I will have to go over there someday and
> see what they have.
>
> There is an Indian market right in my small town, but I was very
> disappointed. They had almost nothing except cigarettes and some foods
> imported from India, and it was a very creepy place. The two men who
> were working there kept staring at me, I'd move into another aisle and
> they'd both move so they could stare at me. I was so creeped out that I
> left without buying anything. I couldn't figure it out, did they think
> I was going to run past both of them with curry powder in my pants?

Are you blonde by any chance? A friend's daughter (who looks kind of like
Gwynneth Paltrow) did an architectural tour of India, going to places that
don't regularly get blonde tourists, and said that the men and boys stared
at her, wanted to have their pictures taken with her, and touched her
excessively. She wasn't afraid, it was just a nuisance.

--
Cheers, Bev
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
"I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we could to protect
our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security."
--Microsoft VP in charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.

The Real Bev
July 12th 03, 03:24 AM
Karen Wheless wrote:
>
> > Do you have any Asian or other 'ethnic' markets within
> > reach? We buy fruit and veg at either our Chinese or
> > Vietnamese markets. Much cheaper than any of the
> > supermarkets and it's very good quality; mostly from
> > California. Not that I know what to do with 10 kinds of
> > mint, but nice to have it handy.
>
> One opened about 20 miles away, I will have to go over there someday and
> see what they have.
>
> There is an Indian market right in my small town, but I was very
> disappointed. They had almost nothing except cigarettes and some foods
> imported from India, and it was a very creepy place. The two men who
> were working there kept staring at me, I'd move into another aisle and
> they'd both move so they could stare at me. I was so creeped out that I
> left without buying anything. I couldn't figure it out, did they think
> I was going to run past both of them with curry powder in my pants?

Are you blonde by any chance? A friend's daughter (who looks kind of like
Gwynneth Paltrow) did an architectural tour of India, going to places that
don't regularly get blonde tourists, and said that the men and boys stared
at her, wanted to have their pictures taken with her, and touched her
excessively. She wasn't afraid, it was just a nuisance.

--
Cheers, Bev
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
"I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we could to protect
our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security."
--Microsoft VP in charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.

Arri London
July 13th 03, 01:30 AM
The Real Bev wrote:
>
> Arri London wrote:
>
> > Not that I know what to do with 10 kinds of
> > mint, but nice to have it handy.
>
> I didn't know there were that many kinds of mint, but the one my kids gave
> me from their new house grows like a weed via blown seeds or underground
> roots. Stick it somewhere it will get watered regularly and it's happy.
>
> I was amazed at the number of varieties of bok choi.
>
> --
> Cheers, Bev


Some of them may not have been true mint, but looked
related. The Vietnamese do love fresh herbs with so many
foods.
I got a pot full of spearmint from someone down the street.
Thought it had died over the winter (left it in the herb bed
in the pot) but it has recovered.

I'm very slowly trying to learn the Vietnamese names for all
the leafy greens usually on display. Most are labelled in
Vietnamese and Chinese. Once in a while someone slips and
labels something in English LOL!

My bok choi in the garden looks very strange, but I put that
down to the high temps we've had for the past two weeks.
It's all bolted in any case.

Arri London
July 13th 03, 01:30 AM
The Real Bev wrote:
>
> Arri London wrote:
>
> > Not that I know what to do with 10 kinds of
> > mint, but nice to have it handy.
>
> I didn't know there were that many kinds of mint, but the one my kids gave
> me from their new house grows like a weed via blown seeds or underground
> roots. Stick it somewhere it will get watered regularly and it's happy.
>
> I was amazed at the number of varieties of bok choi.
>
> --
> Cheers, Bev


Some of them may not have been true mint, but looked
related. The Vietnamese do love fresh herbs with so many
foods.
I got a pot full of spearmint from someone down the street.
Thought it had died over the winter (left it in the herb bed
in the pot) but it has recovered.

I'm very slowly trying to learn the Vietnamese names for all
the leafy greens usually on display. Most are labelled in
Vietnamese and Chinese. Once in a while someone slips and
labels something in English LOL!

My bok choi in the garden looks very strange, but I put that
down to the high temps we've had for the past two weeks.
It's all bolted in any case.

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