PDA

View Full Version : Re: cold brewed coffee


Fritz M
July 8th 03, 08:43 PM
wrote:


> IIRC, the 'oils' are what give coffee it's taste. This is why instant
> coffee usually sucks; you can't preserve the oils.

That's correct; I realized that when I skimmed the scum, but it looked
so nasty I had to do it. There was still a bit of an oily sheen on top
even after the skimming.

RFM
--
To reply, translate domain from l33+ 2p33|< to alpha.
4=a 0=o 3=e +=t

Nina
July 9th 03, 12:30 AM
"Fritz M" +> wrote
> I filled a glass with ice cubes, filled halfway with the cold brew
> coffee, the rest with milk, and dumped that into the blender. Added
> some sugar and chocalate-flavored Ovaltine to make a "Frappacino" type
> beverage. It wasn't as good as a Starbucks Mocha Malt Frappacino, but
> it was still pretty good and I can still tweak the recipe some. It's
> certainly a lot more frugal (about 50 cents versus $3.50).
>

That $3.00 difference would make it taste a LOT better to me. :)

Nina
July 9th 03, 12:30 AM
"Fritz M" +> wrote
> I filled a glass with ice cubes, filled halfway with the cold brew
> coffee, the rest with milk, and dumped that into the blender. Added
> some sugar and chocalate-flavored Ovaltine to make a "Frappacino" type
> beverage. It wasn't as good as a Starbucks Mocha Malt Frappacino, but
> it was still pretty good and I can still tweak the recipe some. It's
> certainly a lot more frugal (about 50 cents versus $3.50).
>

That $3.00 difference would make it taste a LOT better to me. :)

Bonita and/or William F. Kale
July 9th 03, 03:14 PM
Nina wrote:
> That $3.00 difference would make it taste a LOT better to me. :)


And speaking of that, how much do you guys pay for coffee? I
just read an note in Newsweek (page 53 of the July 14 issue)
mentions organic coffee: "And at about $9.49 per pound, the
ecoconscious roasts don't cost much more than your regular java."

Well, that's a -lot- more than -my- regular java, thank you. I
guess Newsweek pays pretty well.

Bonita

Bonita and/or William F. Kale
July 9th 03, 03:14 PM
Nina wrote:
> That $3.00 difference would make it taste a LOT better to me. :)


And speaking of that, how much do you guys pay for coffee? I
just read an note in Newsweek (page 53 of the July 14 issue)
mentions organic coffee: "And at about $9.49 per pound, the
ecoconscious roasts don't cost much more than your regular java."

Well, that's a -lot- more than -my- regular java, thank you. I
guess Newsweek pays pretty well.

Bonita

Nina
July 9th 03, 05:13 PM
"Bonita and/or William F. Kale" > wrote in message
...
> Nina wrote:
> > That $3.00 difference would make it taste a LOT better to me. :)
>
>
> And speaking of that, how much do you guys pay for coffee? I
> just read an note in Newsweek (page 53 of the July 14 issue)
> mentions organic coffee: "And at about $9.49 per pound, the
> ecoconscious roasts don't cost much more than your regular java."
>
> Well, that's a -lot- more than -my- regular java, thank you. I
> guess Newsweek pays pretty well.
>
Yikes. I stopped buying when it got to like $7/lb, not sure what it costs
now!

Nina
July 9th 03, 05:13 PM
"Bonita and/or William F. Kale" > wrote in message
...
> Nina wrote:
> > That $3.00 difference would make it taste a LOT better to me. :)
>
>
> And speaking of that, how much do you guys pay for coffee? I
> just read an note in Newsweek (page 53 of the July 14 issue)
> mentions organic coffee: "And at about $9.49 per pound, the
> ecoconscious roasts don't cost much more than your regular java."
>
> Well, that's a -lot- more than -my- regular java, thank you. I
> guess Newsweek pays pretty well.
>
Yikes. I stopped buying when it got to like $7/lb, not sure what it costs
now!

Nina
July 9th 03, 05:53 PM
"Bonita and/or William F. Kale" > wrote in message
...
> Nina wrote:
> > That $3.00 difference would make it taste a LOT better to me. :)
>
>
> And speaking of that, how much do you guys pay for coffee? I
> just read an note in Newsweek (page 53 of the July 14 issue)
> mentions organic coffee: "And at about $9.49 per pound, the
> ecoconscious roasts don't cost much more than your regular java."
>
> Well, that's a -lot- more than -my- regular java, thank you. I
> guess Newsweek pays pretty well.
>
Yikes. I stopped buying when it got to like $7/lb, not sure what it costs
now!

Nina
July 9th 03, 05:53 PM
"Bonita and/or William F. Kale" > wrote in message
...
> Nina wrote:
> > That $3.00 difference would make it taste a LOT better to me. :)
>
>
> And speaking of that, how much do you guys pay for coffee? I
> just read an note in Newsweek (page 53 of the July 14 issue)
> mentions organic coffee: "And at about $9.49 per pound, the
> ecoconscious roasts don't cost much more than your regular java."
>
> Well, that's a -lot- more than -my- regular java, thank you. I
> guess Newsweek pays pretty well.
>
Yikes. I stopped buying when it got to like $7/lb, not sure what it costs
now!

Nina
July 9th 03, 06:03 PM
Not sure why OE is hiccuping today!

"Nina" > wrote in message
t...
>
> "Bonita and/or William F. Kale" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Nina wrote:
> > > That $3.00 difference would make it taste a LOT better to me. :)
> >
> >
> > And speaking of that, how much do you guys pay for coffee? I
> > just read an note in Newsweek (page 53 of the July 14 issue)
> > mentions organic coffee: "And at about $9.49 per pound, the
> > ecoconscious roasts don't cost much more than your regular java."
> >
> > Well, that's a -lot- more than -my- regular java, thank you. I
> > guess Newsweek pays pretty well.
> >
> Yikes. I stopped buying when it got to like $7/lb, not sure what it costs
> now!
>
>

Nina
July 9th 03, 06:03 PM
Not sure why OE is hiccuping today!

"Nina" > wrote in message
t...
>
> "Bonita and/or William F. Kale" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Nina wrote:
> > > That $3.00 difference would make it taste a LOT better to me. :)
> >
> >
> > And speaking of that, how much do you guys pay for coffee? I
> > just read an note in Newsweek (page 53 of the July 14 issue)
> > mentions organic coffee: "And at about $9.49 per pound, the
> > ecoconscious roasts don't cost much more than your regular java."
> >
> > Well, that's a -lot- more than -my- regular java, thank you. I
> > guess Newsweek pays pretty well.
> >
> Yikes. I stopped buying when it got to like $7/lb, not sure what it costs
> now!
>
>

Fritz M
July 9th 03, 10:08 PM
(Ken) wrote:

> I'm thinking of course you have very mild coffee, you used
> very little ground coffee, hence a weak brew.

It wasn't really weak so much as less flavorful somehow. The actual
taste is different yet the concentration seemed to be about the same.

> If you use more coffee
> when you use boiling water, give the same amount a try with your cold
> method and let us know how you like it.

I thought about trying what you suggest: starting with more grounds and
pouring boiling water over the grounds and letting that sit all day.
I'll let the group know how it turns out when I get around to it.

RFM
--
To reply, translate domain from l33+ 2p33|< to alpha.
4=a 0=o 3=e +=t

Fritz M
July 9th 03, 10:08 PM
(Ken) wrote:

> I'm thinking of course you have very mild coffee, you used
> very little ground coffee, hence a weak brew.

It wasn't really weak so much as less flavorful somehow. The actual
taste is different yet the concentration seemed to be about the same.

> If you use more coffee
> when you use boiling water, give the same amount a try with your cold
> method and let us know how you like it.

I thought about trying what you suggest: starting with more grounds and
pouring boiling water over the grounds and letting that sit all day.
I'll let the group know how it turns out when I get around to it.

RFM
--
To reply, translate domain from l33+ 2p33|< to alpha.
4=a 0=o 3=e +=t

JimL
July 12th 03, 04:10 AM
Fritz M +> wrote in message >...
> (Ken) wrote:
>
> > I'm thinking of course you have very mild coffee, you used
> > very little ground coffee, hence a weak brew.
>
> It wasn't really weak so much as less flavorful somehow. The actual
> taste is different yet the concentration seemed to be about the same.
>
> > If you use more coffee
> > when you use boiling water, give the same amount a try with your cold
> > method and let us know how you like it.
>
> I thought about trying what you suggest: starting with more grounds and
> pouring boiling water over the grounds and letting that sit all day.
> I'll let the group know how it turns out when I get around to it.
>
> RFM



YIKES!!! Boiling water over grounds and sit all day???!!!
Noooooooo.
That's the French Press method, and boiling water over grounds only
takes 3-4 minutes to make finished coffee. Then pour through a
strainer into the cup or carafe. (Those expensive French Press pots
are merely pitchers with a built in filter/strainer.)

If you want cold brew, try the coffee extract method:

Put a pound of coffee grounds (yes, a pound) with nine cups of cold
water in a glass container. Let sit overnight. Strain out the
grounds. The result is a coffee concentrate, which you keep in a
sealed glass (jelly?) jar in the fridge.
When making coffee, put about one tablespoon of the concentrate in a
cup (more if in a mug) and fill with hot water -- hot or boiling,
doesn't matter at this point, whatever you prefer as drinking
temperature.

That's it. Put the jar of extract, or concentrate, back in the
fridge.

Manufacturers sell devices to do the soaking process. They're usually
called "toddies." But a pitcher, or jar, and a strainer work just
fine.

JimL
July 12th 03, 04:10 AM
Fritz M +> wrote in message >...
> (Ken) wrote:
>
> > I'm thinking of course you have very mild coffee, you used
> > very little ground coffee, hence a weak brew.
>
> It wasn't really weak so much as less flavorful somehow. The actual
> taste is different yet the concentration seemed to be about the same.
>
> > If you use more coffee
> > when you use boiling water, give the same amount a try with your cold
> > method and let us know how you like it.
>
> I thought about trying what you suggest: starting with more grounds and
> pouring boiling water over the grounds and letting that sit all day.
> I'll let the group know how it turns out when I get around to it.
>
> RFM



YIKES!!! Boiling water over grounds and sit all day???!!!
Noooooooo.
That's the French Press method, and boiling water over grounds only
takes 3-4 minutes to make finished coffee. Then pour through a
strainer into the cup or carafe. (Those expensive French Press pots
are merely pitchers with a built in filter/strainer.)

If you want cold brew, try the coffee extract method:

Put a pound of coffee grounds (yes, a pound) with nine cups of cold
water in a glass container. Let sit overnight. Strain out the
grounds. The result is a coffee concentrate, which you keep in a
sealed glass (jelly?) jar in the fridge.
When making coffee, put about one tablespoon of the concentrate in a
cup (more if in a mug) and fill with hot water -- hot or boiling,
doesn't matter at this point, whatever you prefer as drinking
temperature.

That's it. Put the jar of extract, or concentrate, back in the
fridge.

Manufacturers sell devices to do the soaking process. They're usually
called "toddies." But a pitcher, or jar, and a strainer work just
fine.

Google