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View Full Version : Re: There's a MOUSE in my house


Lena
July 8th 03, 10:25 PM
> advised
> The sticky traps work well too,

especially if you put some peanut butter in the middle.
--
Lena

put "hotmail" in the subject line to get through the filters

The Real Bev
July 8th 03, 11:13 PM
wrote:
>
> On Tue, 8 Jul 2003 16:13:58 -0400, (Karen
> Wheless) wrote:
>
> >I've had the occasional bug in my apartment, but never a mouse. (My
> >apartment is a free standing cinder block apartment, converted from a
> >garage, with a cement floor). But today, I saw one run right across my
> >kitchen floor. Eeeek. (I'm not really someone who jumps on chairs to
> >get away from mice, but I don't want one sharing my apartment with me).
> >
> >I checked my food - I had a few things stored on the floor, but none of
> >it was touched. I have a very small kitchen and no cabinets, so my food
> >is stored on open shelving, but only a couple of things were on the
> >bottom shelf or on the floor, all in sealed containers, but I moved
> >those up onto the counter for now. I wonder if the mouse was driven in
> >because the outside of my apartment was "power washed" today, in
> >preparation for repainting - but I don't know how it got in, I don't see
> >any gaps or holes around the cement foundation or the cinder block
> >walls. Although I suppose there must be a hole somewhere for the
> >plumbing pipes.
> >
> >What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
> >message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
> >thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
> >repellant to put across my bedroom door?
> >
> >Karen
>
> There's mousetraps available that have the trigger plate scented; you
> don't have to put any food on them. I find they work pretty well.
>
> The sticky traps work well too, but you still have to dispose of the
> guest, and it may still be alive and need the coupe de grace....

Adjust the trigger on an ordinary mousetrap so it snaps easily.
Attach a piece of apple to the bait-thing
Spread peanut butter on it.
Wrap thread around the baited tray -- you want the mouse to really have to
pull.
Set and place it in a small paper sack, bait-side pointing to the opening.
Place next to wall near where you saw the villain.
When you see a tail protruding from the bag, roll the whole thing up and
toss it in the trash.

Anybody who can't afford to throw away a used mousetrap is spending way
too much money on something less useful.

--
Cheers,
Bev
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"My life outside of USENET is so full of love and kindness that I have
to come here to find the venom and bile that I crave." --R. Damiani

The Real Bev
July 8th 03, 11:13 PM
wrote:
>
> On Tue, 8 Jul 2003 16:13:58 -0400, (Karen
> Wheless) wrote:
>
> >I've had the occasional bug in my apartment, but never a mouse. (My
> >apartment is a free standing cinder block apartment, converted from a
> >garage, with a cement floor). But today, I saw one run right across my
> >kitchen floor. Eeeek. (I'm not really someone who jumps on chairs to
> >get away from mice, but I don't want one sharing my apartment with me).
> >
> >I checked my food - I had a few things stored on the floor, but none of
> >it was touched. I have a very small kitchen and no cabinets, so my food
> >is stored on open shelving, but only a couple of things were on the
> >bottom shelf or on the floor, all in sealed containers, but I moved
> >those up onto the counter for now. I wonder if the mouse was driven in
> >because the outside of my apartment was "power washed" today, in
> >preparation for repainting - but I don't know how it got in, I don't see
> >any gaps or holes around the cement foundation or the cinder block
> >walls. Although I suppose there must be a hole somewhere for the
> >plumbing pipes.
> >
> >What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
> >message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
> >thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
> >repellant to put across my bedroom door?
> >
> >Karen
>
> There's mousetraps available that have the trigger plate scented; you
> don't have to put any food on them. I find they work pretty well.
>
> The sticky traps work well too, but you still have to dispose of the
> guest, and it may still be alive and need the coupe de grace....

Adjust the trigger on an ordinary mousetrap so it snaps easily.
Attach a piece of apple to the bait-thing
Spread peanut butter on it.
Wrap thread around the baited tray -- you want the mouse to really have to
pull.
Set and place it in a small paper sack, bait-side pointing to the opening.
Place next to wall near where you saw the villain.
When you see a tail protruding from the bag, roll the whole thing up and
toss it in the trash.

Anybody who can't afford to throw away a used mousetrap is spending way
too much money on something less useful.

--
Cheers,
Bev
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"My life outside of USENET is so full of love and kindness that I have
to come here to find the venom and bile that I crave." --R. Damiani

Tsu Dho Poster
July 9th 03, 12:02 AM
"Karen Wheless" > wrote in message news:1fx

> What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
> message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
> thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
> repellant to put across my bedroom door?
>
Why do anything? If it's any consolation, mice don't eat much.

If you know anyone taking Warfarin,, the blood thinner, just add some to
food left out. It'll bleed to death internally. That's what it was
originally designed for.

I wouldn't rank it high on an Urgent scale, unless, of course, it's really a
baby rat.....from a high altitude area...and possibly carrying the bubonic
plague....

Tsu Dho Poster
July 9th 03, 12:02 AM
"Karen Wheless" > wrote in message news:1fx

> What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
> message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
> thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
> repellant to put across my bedroom door?
>
Why do anything? If it's any consolation, mice don't eat much.

If you know anyone taking Warfarin,, the blood thinner, just add some to
food left out. It'll bleed to death internally. That's what it was
originally designed for.

I wouldn't rank it high on an Urgent scale, unless, of course, it's really a
baby rat.....from a high altitude area...and possibly carrying the bubonic
plague....

The Real Bev
July 9th 03, 01:56 AM
Dennis wrote:
>
> On Tue, 8 Jul 2003 16:13:58 -0400, (Karen
> Wheless) wrote:
>
> >What should I do?
>
> Good old fashion spring traps baited with peanut butter work for me.

They're not 100% effective, though. I caught one little fellow on his
nose...

> I recently had a mouse take up housekeeping in my car. I set a few
> traps and caught Mr. Mouse -- good riddance!

We had a family take up residence in the glove compartment of our old
truck. The lady at the DMV was not amused when I handed over the
documents to re-register the car, even if I had put them in a plastic bag
so she wouldn't have to actually touch them.

> Then, a few days later, I washed my car. The next morning, there was
> a bad smell coming from the vents and the blower fan was going
> clunk-clunk-clunk -- I guessed that my late guest's nest had washed
> down into a clump in the ductwork. I endured the (steadily worsening)
> smell until the weekend and then dismantled the dash and heater ducts.
> Lo and behold, there was Mrs. Mouse (such as was left of her), stuck
> in the blower fan. Eeeww!. What a mess to clean out.

I'm sure I must have told you about the dessiccated mouse we found when we
opened up the microwave oven...

--
Cheers,
Bev
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is.

The Real Bev
July 9th 03, 01:56 AM
Dennis wrote:
>
> On Tue, 8 Jul 2003 16:13:58 -0400, (Karen
> Wheless) wrote:
>
> >What should I do?
>
> Good old fashion spring traps baited with peanut butter work for me.

They're not 100% effective, though. I caught one little fellow on his
nose...

> I recently had a mouse take up housekeeping in my car. I set a few
> traps and caught Mr. Mouse -- good riddance!

We had a family take up residence in the glove compartment of our old
truck. The lady at the DMV was not amused when I handed over the
documents to re-register the car, even if I had put them in a plastic bag
so she wouldn't have to actually touch them.

> Then, a few days later, I washed my car. The next morning, there was
> a bad smell coming from the vents and the blower fan was going
> clunk-clunk-clunk -- I guessed that my late guest's nest had washed
> down into a clump in the ductwork. I endured the (steadily worsening)
> smell until the weekend and then dismantled the dash and heater ducts.
> Lo and behold, there was Mrs. Mouse (such as was left of her), stuck
> in the blower fan. Eeeww!. What a mess to clean out.

I'm sure I must have told you about the dessiccated mouse we found when we
opened up the microwave oven...

--
Cheers,
Bev
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is.

The Real Bev
July 9th 03, 03:17 AM
GamerGirlDemelza wrote:
>
> Okay so you want to murder it or let it live? Hopefully the last one. Just
> buy a live trap they cost about 5.00 at your local grocery store put some
> peanut butter in the end and check it each day. Then all you have to do is let
> it go outside. 5.00 is a very small price to pay for any life.

For $5 each, I think I know where you can find a lot of cockroaches to
rescue. Send me a $100 deposit and we'll talk.

They're that much now? Cheap little tilting plastic box whose door slams
shut when the mouse is inside? I caught one in my office with one of
those and gave it to the maintenance guy to dispatch. He let it loose out
in the field, which was a good thing. I think they laid me off before it
found its way back.

--
Cheers,
Bev
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $$$$$$$$$$$$$
"If you put the government in charge of the desert, there would
be a sand shortage within ten years." -- M. Friedman (?)

The Real Bev
July 9th 03, 03:17 AM
GamerGirlDemelza wrote:
>
> Okay so you want to murder it or let it live? Hopefully the last one. Just
> buy a live trap they cost about 5.00 at your local grocery store put some
> peanut butter in the end and check it each day. Then all you have to do is let
> it go outside. 5.00 is a very small price to pay for any life.

For $5 each, I think I know where you can find a lot of cockroaches to
rescue. Send me a $100 deposit and we'll talk.

They're that much now? Cheap little tilting plastic box whose door slams
shut when the mouse is inside? I caught one in my office with one of
those and gave it to the maintenance guy to dispatch. He let it loose out
in the field, which was a good thing. I think they laid me off before it
found its way back.

--
Cheers,
Bev
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $$$$$$$$$$$$$
"If you put the government in charge of the desert, there would
be a sand shortage within ten years." -- M. Friedman (?)

Frank White
July 9th 03, 05:23 AM
In article >,
says...
>
>I've had the occasional bug in my apartment, but never a mouse. (My
>apartment is a free standing cinder block apartment, converted from a
>garage, with a cement floor). But today, I saw one run right across my
>kitchen floor. Eeeek. (I'm not really someone who jumps on chairs to
>get away from mice, but I don't want one sharing my apartment with me).

Darn right! Mice are PAINS. Not only do they get in everywhere,
but they're incredibly filthy animals, leaving droppings all over
the place. And wasteful, too! They don't just eat a bit and are
satisfied; no, they nibble here, nibble there, even if it's not
edible, spoil everything...

Nuke 'em.

>I checked my food - I had a few things stored on the floor, but none of
>it was touched. I have a very small kitchen and no cabinets, so my food
>is stored on open shelving, but only a couple of things were on the
>bottom shelf or on the floor, all in sealed containers, but I moved
>those up onto the counter for now. I wonder if the mouse was driven in
>because the outside of my apartment was "power washed" today, in
>preparation for repainting - but I don't know how it got in, I don't see
>any gaps or holes around the cement foundation or the cinder block
>walls. Although I suppose there must be a hole somewhere for the
>plumbing pipes.

Mice can get in ANYwhere. Their bodies are amazing soft and
flexible, and can squeeze through holes you'd have trouble getting
a thumb into...

>What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
>message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
>thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
>repellant to put across my bedroom door?

Nuke him.

You've got two choices: Traps and poison. (I assume animals are
out, otherwise I'd suggest a terrier. they've got more drive
than a cat.)

For traps use the old fashioned spring kind, bait with chunky
peanut butter with one of the chunks wedged into the gap in
the trigger to the point the mouse has to pull to get it out,
and set the trap where the mouse will find it.

And set out several traps, even after you get the little
bugger; he may not be alone.

Poison: The main proiblem is that he may not leave the
building before he dies, and a decomposing mouse can stink
like you CAN'T believe. But it's a surer method than
traps. DeCon always works.

Good luck. Don't pull your punches on this, go for a kill.

FW

Frank White
July 9th 03, 05:23 AM
In article >,
says...
>
>I've had the occasional bug in my apartment, but never a mouse. (My
>apartment is a free standing cinder block apartment, converted from a
>garage, with a cement floor). But today, I saw one run right across my
>kitchen floor. Eeeek. (I'm not really someone who jumps on chairs to
>get away from mice, but I don't want one sharing my apartment with me).

Darn right! Mice are PAINS. Not only do they get in everywhere,
but they're incredibly filthy animals, leaving droppings all over
the place. And wasteful, too! They don't just eat a bit and are
satisfied; no, they nibble here, nibble there, even if it's not
edible, spoil everything...

Nuke 'em.

>I checked my food - I had a few things stored on the floor, but none of
>it was touched. I have a very small kitchen and no cabinets, so my food
>is stored on open shelving, but only a couple of things were on the
>bottom shelf or on the floor, all in sealed containers, but I moved
>those up onto the counter for now. I wonder if the mouse was driven in
>because the outside of my apartment was "power washed" today, in
>preparation for repainting - but I don't know how it got in, I don't see
>any gaps or holes around the cement foundation or the cinder block
>walls. Although I suppose there must be a hole somewhere for the
>plumbing pipes.

Mice can get in ANYwhere. Their bodies are amazing soft and
flexible, and can squeeze through holes you'd have trouble getting
a thumb into...

>What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
>message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
>thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
>repellant to put across my bedroom door?

Nuke him.

You've got two choices: Traps and poison. (I assume animals are
out, otherwise I'd suggest a terrier. they've got more drive
than a cat.)

For traps use the old fashioned spring kind, bait with chunky
peanut butter with one of the chunks wedged into the gap in
the trigger to the point the mouse has to pull to get it out,
and set the trap where the mouse will find it.

And set out several traps, even after you get the little
bugger; he may not be alone.

Poison: The main proiblem is that he may not leave the
building before he dies, and a decomposing mouse can stink
like you CAN'T believe. But it's a surer method than
traps. DeCon always works.

Good luck. Don't pull your punches on this, go for a kill.

FW

July 9th 03, 05:26 AM
In article >,
(Karen Wheless) wrote:

> I've had the occasional bug in my apartment, but never a mouse. (My
> apartment is a free standing cinder block apartment, converted from a
> garage, with a cement floor). But today, I saw one run right across
> my kitchen floor. Eeeek.

Heh. They can be pretty startling, no?

> I wonder if the mouse was driven in because the outside of my
> apartment was "power washed" today, in preparation for repainting -
> but I don't know how it got in, I don't see any gaps or holes around
> the cement foundation or the cinder block walls. Although I suppose
> there must be a hole somewhere for the plumbing pipes.

I've heard that full-grown rats can enter through a hole smaller than a
quarter. I imagine mice are even more agile.

> What should I do?

I like linda-renee's idea. Borrow a friend's cat for a few days. Or go
get one of your own.

If I didn't have so many cats, I'd use a live trap, but you might want
to go with a regular spring trap. Try to avoid poison (someone
suggested warfarin); if the poisoned mouse escapes outside, its
agonizing death-by-internal-hemorrhage could spread to predators and
then scavengers.

I've also heard that if you *see* a mouse, chances are good that there
a lots more you don't see. One mouse doesn't eat much, but a single
mouse can ruin a ten-pound bag of rice or rolled oats pretty quick.
Mouse infestations have destroyed entire granaries.

Mice--specifically, mouse feces--are a known vector in spreading hanta
virus in the southwest US (and I believe in other areas, too--for some
reason, Pennsylvania comes to mind). The virus apparently lives in the
dried fecal matter which the victim inhales as dust. IIRC, you have to
inhale a LOT of it, but once infected, the disease exacts a high
mortality rate even with prompt, intense treatment.

That's the worst possibility I know of but I bet there are plenty of
other health reasons to get rid of wild mice in your home.

July 9th 03, 05:26 AM
In article >,
(Karen Wheless) wrote:

> I've had the occasional bug in my apartment, but never a mouse. (My
> apartment is a free standing cinder block apartment, converted from a
> garage, with a cement floor). But today, I saw one run right across
> my kitchen floor. Eeeek.

Heh. They can be pretty startling, no?

> I wonder if the mouse was driven in because the outside of my
> apartment was "power washed" today, in preparation for repainting -
> but I don't know how it got in, I don't see any gaps or holes around
> the cement foundation or the cinder block walls. Although I suppose
> there must be a hole somewhere for the plumbing pipes.

I've heard that full-grown rats can enter through a hole smaller than a
quarter. I imagine mice are even more agile.

> What should I do?

I like linda-renee's idea. Borrow a friend's cat for a few days. Or go
get one of your own.

If I didn't have so many cats, I'd use a live trap, but you might want
to go with a regular spring trap. Try to avoid poison (someone
suggested warfarin); if the poisoned mouse escapes outside, its
agonizing death-by-internal-hemorrhage could spread to predators and
then scavengers.

I've also heard that if you *see* a mouse, chances are good that there
a lots more you don't see. One mouse doesn't eat much, but a single
mouse can ruin a ten-pound bag of rice or rolled oats pretty quick.
Mouse infestations have destroyed entire granaries.

Mice--specifically, mouse feces--are a known vector in spreading hanta
virus in the southwest US (and I believe in other areas, too--for some
reason, Pennsylvania comes to mind). The virus apparently lives in the
dried fecal matter which the victim inhales as dust. IIRC, you have to
inhale a LOT of it, but once infected, the disease exacts a high
mortality rate even with prompt, intense treatment.

That's the worst possibility I know of but I bet there are plenty of
other health reasons to get rid of wild mice in your home.

Nina
July 9th 03, 07:38 AM
> wrote in message
...
> wrote:
>
> >There's mousetraps available that have the trigger plate scented; you
> >don't have to put any food on them. I find they work pretty well.
> >
> >The sticky traps work well too, but you still have to dispose of the
> >guest, and it may still be alive and need the coupe de grace....
>
> I would never use a sticky trap on a mouse. The spring traps are bad
enough,
> but glue traps are disgusting when the mouse rips skin off or knaws off a
limb
> to try to escape.
>
I prefer when the cats eat them, nothin left but a little fur. Is that
cruel?

Nina
July 9th 03, 07:38 AM
> wrote in message
...
> wrote:
>
> >There's mousetraps available that have the trigger plate scented; you
> >don't have to put any food on them. I find they work pretty well.
> >
> >The sticky traps work well too, but you still have to dispose of the
> >guest, and it may still be alive and need the coupe de grace....
>
> I would never use a sticky trap on a mouse. The spring traps are bad
enough,
> but glue traps are disgusting when the mouse rips skin off or knaws off a
limb
> to try to escape.
>
I prefer when the cats eat them, nothin left but a little fur. Is that
cruel?

Dennis P. Harris
July 9th 03, 09:01 AM
On Tue, 8 Jul 2003 16:13:58 -0400 in
misc.consumers.frugal-living, (Karen
Wheless) wrote:

> What should I do?

borrow a cat. take all the bottom drawers out of your kitchen
cabinets, and leave the door under the sink open. leave the cat
in the house overnight.

Dennis P. Harris
July 9th 03, 09:01 AM
On Tue, 8 Jul 2003 16:13:58 -0400 in
misc.consumers.frugal-living, (Karen
Wheless) wrote:

> What should I do?

borrow a cat. take all the bottom drawers out of your kitchen
cabinets, and leave the door under the sink open. leave the cat
in the house overnight.

Christopher Green
July 9th 03, 09:50 AM
"Tsu Dho Poster" > wrote in message >...
> "Karen Wheless" > wrote in message news:1fx
>
> > What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
> > message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
> > thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
> > repellant to put across my bedroom door?
> >
> Why do anything? If it's any consolation, mice don't eat much.

If they showed up one at a time, that might be a reasonable approach.
But where there's one, there's more, and they reproduce a lot faster
than rabbits. And they spoil what they don't eat.

> If you know anyone taking Warfarin,, the blood thinner, just add some to
> food left out. It'll bleed to death internally. That's what it was
> originally designed for.

Prescription coumadin (Warfarin) is awfully expensive compared to
baits, it's less attractive to the critters, and you're more likely to
encounter (or select for) resistant ones. The bait makers keep
updating their formulas to stay one step ahead of evolution.

The real problem with bait is that they may eat it, walk away, and die
where you can't find them until your nose leads you to their last
hiding place.

> I wouldn't rank it high on an Urgent scale, unless, of course, it's really a
> baby rat.....from a high altitude area...and possibly carrying the bubonic
> plague....

Depending upon what kind of mice you have, they regularly carry
hantavirus, anywhere in the U.S. Deer mice and white-footed mice, but
not the Old World house mouse, are carriers. This is a good reason to
want your mouse trapped and identified.

--
Chris Green

Christopher Green
July 9th 03, 09:50 AM
"Tsu Dho Poster" > wrote in message >...
> "Karen Wheless" > wrote in message news:1fx
>
> > What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
> > message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
> > thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
> > repellant to put across my bedroom door?
> >
> Why do anything? If it's any consolation, mice don't eat much.

If they showed up one at a time, that might be a reasonable approach.
But where there's one, there's more, and they reproduce a lot faster
than rabbits. And they spoil what they don't eat.

> If you know anyone taking Warfarin,, the blood thinner, just add some to
> food left out. It'll bleed to death internally. That's what it was
> originally designed for.

Prescription coumadin (Warfarin) is awfully expensive compared to
baits, it's less attractive to the critters, and you're more likely to
encounter (or select for) resistant ones. The bait makers keep
updating their formulas to stay one step ahead of evolution.

The real problem with bait is that they may eat it, walk away, and die
where you can't find them until your nose leads you to their last
hiding place.

> I wouldn't rank it high on an Urgent scale, unless, of course, it's really a
> baby rat.....from a high altitude area...and possibly carrying the bubonic
> plague....

Depending upon what kind of mice you have, they regularly carry
hantavirus, anywhere in the U.S. Deer mice and white-footed mice, but
not the Old World house mouse, are carriers. This is a good reason to
want your mouse trapped and identified.

--
Chris Green

Joe
July 9th 03, 02:16 PM
LOL...

I read moose, not mouse.

Traps work well if placed in a warm, damp area of the house - like the
basement or closet near a water heater / furnace. Use peanut butter (and
bacon grease if you've got it) as bait.

Glue traps are more effective, but if you can't stand seeing a living
creature stuck to a board, skip 'em.

And as others said, chances are you have many mice, not a single mouse.

Regards,
Joe - VROC #8013 - '86 VN750 - joe @ yunx .com - 973.571.1456 24/7

Ask me about "The Ride" on July 26: http://www.youthelate.com/the_ride.htm

$0.03 bargain: http://tinyurl.com/9sz6


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
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Joe
July 9th 03, 02:16 PM
LOL...

I read moose, not mouse.

Traps work well if placed in a warm, damp area of the house - like the
basement or closet near a water heater / furnace. Use peanut butter (and
bacon grease if you've got it) as bait.

Glue traps are more effective, but if you can't stand seeing a living
creature stuck to a board, skip 'em.

And as others said, chances are you have many mice, not a single mouse.

Regards,
Joe - VROC #8013 - '86 VN750 - joe @ yunx .com - 973.571.1456 24/7

Ask me about "The Ride" on July 26: http://www.youthelate.com/the_ride.htm

$0.03 bargain: http://tinyurl.com/9sz6


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.497 / Virus Database: 296 - Release Date: 7/4/03

PRxword
July 9th 03, 03:33 PM
> What should I do?

One thing that no one has mentioned is to stuff steel wool into any gaps around
under-sink pipes or any other small openings you can find. At least no others
could come in through this route. Worked for us!

Pat & Larry


PRxword
July 9th 03, 03:33 PM
> What should I do?

One thing that no one has mentioned is to stuff steel wool into any gaps around
under-sink pipes or any other small openings you can find. At least no others
could come in through this route. Worked for us!

Pat & Larry


Nick Pine
July 9th 03, 04:12 PM
drifter > wrote:

>Don't panic. As disgusting as it may sound, look for mouse droppings
>for two reason... The most likely place of entry is open doors or widows
>in the evening... Your options are (mice food (poison)) or traps. Fresh
>good poison is very effective but traps can take a while... Sadly, the
>space needed to permit a mouse to inter your home is extremely small...

Fresh good poison sounds better than traps, if we wish to avoid interment.

Nick

Nick Pine
July 9th 03, 04:12 PM
drifter > wrote:

>Don't panic. As disgusting as it may sound, look for mouse droppings
>for two reason... The most likely place of entry is open doors or widows
>in the evening... Your options are (mice food (poison)) or traps. Fresh
>good poison is very effective but traps can take a while... Sadly, the
>space needed to permit a mouse to inter your home is extremely small...

Fresh good poison sounds better than traps, if we wish to avoid interment.

Nick

Dennis
July 9th 03, 05:59 PM
On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 05:38:38 GMT, "Nina" >
wrote:

>I prefer when the cats eat them, nothin left but a little fur.

Except for every now and then when you find a lovely pile of barfed-up
mouse guts on your rug.

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

Dennis
July 9th 03, 05:59 PM
On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 05:38:38 GMT, "Nina" >
wrote:

>I prefer when the cats eat them, nothin left but a little fur.

Except for every now and then when you find a lovely pile of barfed-up
mouse guts on your rug.

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

Karen Wheless
July 9th 03, 06:16 PM
I bought a couple of cheap snap traps (the only kind the local hardware
store carried - another disadvantage to small local stores). I set it
with some peanut butter (after snapping it on my fingers a few times,
this "easy set" model was much harder to set than the old fashioned
kind) and last night, I had success.

I found a dead mouse in it this morning. Ick. My landlord was very
concerned about the mouse and the handyman got rid of it, thankfully. I
wasn't looking forward to disposing of the body.

My landlord said she set the remaining traps, but I'm not sure she
really did - they're hard to set and both were snapped when I got home
just now. I don't really want snap traps on my floor for much longer, I
keep worrying I'll step on one in my bare feet, and the peanut butter
will probably attract bugs, so I will probably either get some poison or
another type of trap to put out in case there are more mice under there.

I feel a little guilty about my dead mouse - I read Mrs. Frisby and the
Rats of NIMH too often as a child - although there's really no place
nearby to "let loose" a humanely caught mouse, I live in the busy
suburbs with no woods anywhere nearby - just a couple of parks that
mostly consist of softball fields. I'm sure my mouse would have been
back inside before I made it home again. But maybe I'll see if I can
find one of those at Home Depot.

Thanks for the advice - I'd love to get a cat, but it's not allowed in
my apartment. I still can't figure out how it got in - the pipes come
up through the cement floor and there's almost no visible space around
them. But I guess mice are really resourceful.

Karen

Karen Wheless
July 9th 03, 06:16 PM
I bought a couple of cheap snap traps (the only kind the local hardware
store carried - another disadvantage to small local stores). I set it
with some peanut butter (after snapping it on my fingers a few times,
this "easy set" model was much harder to set than the old fashioned
kind) and last night, I had success.

I found a dead mouse in it this morning. Ick. My landlord was very
concerned about the mouse and the handyman got rid of it, thankfully. I
wasn't looking forward to disposing of the body.

My landlord said she set the remaining traps, but I'm not sure she
really did - they're hard to set and both were snapped when I got home
just now. I don't really want snap traps on my floor for much longer, I
keep worrying I'll step on one in my bare feet, and the peanut butter
will probably attract bugs, so I will probably either get some poison or
another type of trap to put out in case there are more mice under there.

I feel a little guilty about my dead mouse - I read Mrs. Frisby and the
Rats of NIMH too often as a child - although there's really no place
nearby to "let loose" a humanely caught mouse, I live in the busy
suburbs with no woods anywhere nearby - just a couple of parks that
mostly consist of softball fields. I'm sure my mouse would have been
back inside before I made it home again. But maybe I'll see if I can
find one of those at Home Depot.

Thanks for the advice - I'd love to get a cat, but it's not allowed in
my apartment. I still can't figure out how it got in - the pipes come
up through the cement floor and there's almost no visible space around
them. But I guess mice are really resourceful.

Karen

Kent Durham
July 9th 03, 07:14 PM
In article >,
Karen Wheless > wrote:
>What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
>message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
>thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
>repellant to put across my bedroom door?

I had several mice in my house about 3 years ago when there was a big gap
to the outside world left around pipes after a dishwasher installation.
I had the best luck with the old fashioned wooden spring traps filled with
cheese. Put them up next to the wall close to where you've seen evidence
of the mouse (dropppings or where it has been running). I must have
caught 3 or 4 with them. The traps are about a buck each at the grocery
store/hardware store. I just toss the mouse and the trap out togethre at
the end. I'm not prying the dead mouse out of the thing for a dollar.

Not too scientific, but I had some of the sticky traps, too. I put a
sticky trap right next to the wooden trap, and I only caught mice in the
wooden trap. (That may just prove what direction the mice were running in
the kitchen, but the wooden ones were cheaper and did the job.)

After you've caught the mouse, leave a trap out for a while. You may
think you just have one, but there's a good chance there are others that
you haven't seen. If you go a week or so without catching another one,
you should be in the clear.

Kent
--

Kent Durham
July 9th 03, 07:14 PM
In article >,
Karen Wheless > wrote:
>What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
>message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
>thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
>repellant to put across my bedroom door?

I had several mice in my house about 3 years ago when there was a big gap
to the outside world left around pipes after a dishwasher installation.
I had the best luck with the old fashioned wooden spring traps filled with
cheese. Put them up next to the wall close to where you've seen evidence
of the mouse (dropppings or where it has been running). I must have
caught 3 or 4 with them. The traps are about a buck each at the grocery
store/hardware store. I just toss the mouse and the trap out togethre at
the end. I'm not prying the dead mouse out of the thing for a dollar.

Not too scientific, but I had some of the sticky traps, too. I put a
sticky trap right next to the wooden trap, and I only caught mice in the
wooden trap. (That may just prove what direction the mice were running in
the kitchen, but the wooden ones were cheaper and did the job.)

After you've caught the mouse, leave a trap out for a while. You may
think you just have one, but there's a good chance there are others that
you haven't seen. If you go a week or so without catching another one,
you should be in the clear.

Kent
--

Chloe
July 9th 03, 08:22 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 08:59:40 -0700, Dennis
> > wrote:
>
> >On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 05:38:38 GMT, "Nina" >
> >wrote:
> >
> >>I prefer when the cats eat them, nothin left but a little fur.
> >
> >Except for every now and then when you find a lovely pile of barfed-up
> >mouse guts on your rug.
> >
>
> Besides which any cat I've ever had only ate HALF of the
> mouse, then generally tried to drop the other half on my
> face while I was asleep, or at least on my feet if I were
> awake...
>
> Pat

Yep, but it helps to remember it's just their way of saying they care enough
to bring the very best <g>. Seriously, I've read that when they bring prey
to their favorite human it's modeling what they did as kittens to show mom
they'd learned how to hunt.

Chloe
July 9th 03, 08:22 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 08:59:40 -0700, Dennis
> > wrote:
>
> >On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 05:38:38 GMT, "Nina" >
> >wrote:
> >
> >>I prefer when the cats eat them, nothin left but a little fur.
> >
> >Except for every now and then when you find a lovely pile of barfed-up
> >mouse guts on your rug.
> >
>
> Besides which any cat I've ever had only ate HALF of the
> mouse, then generally tried to drop the other half on my
> face while I was asleep, or at least on my feet if I were
> awake...
>
> Pat

Yep, but it helps to remember it's just their way of saying they care enough
to bring the very best <g>. Seriously, I've read that when they bring prey
to their favorite human it's modeling what they did as kittens to show mom
they'd learned how to hunt.

Nina
July 9th 03, 09:02 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 08:59:40 -0700, Dennis
> > wrote:
>
> >On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 05:38:38 GMT, "Nina" >
> >wrote:
> >
> >>I prefer when the cats eat them, nothin left but a little fur.
> >
> >Except for every now and then when you find a lovely pile of barfed-up
> >mouse guts on your rug.
> >
>
> Besides which any cat I've ever had only ate HALF of the
> mouse, then generally tried to drop the other half on my
> face while I was asleep, or at least on my feet if I were
> awake...
>
They were overfed! :)
My cats will eat a mouse and leave not even the squeak. I did, however, have
a cat who would hunt for chipmunks and deposit them in my brother's bed. I
guess she liked him. But we never had a vermin problem.
Same here, there used to be mice, but I have a good mouser and 2 kittens
plus a tiny terrier who will chase mice (she caught a runaway hamster once).
I'm frugal, no pets here that can't earn their keep!!!!

Nina
July 9th 03, 09:02 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 08:59:40 -0700, Dennis
> > wrote:
>
> >On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 05:38:38 GMT, "Nina" >
> >wrote:
> >
> >>I prefer when the cats eat them, nothin left but a little fur.
> >
> >Except for every now and then when you find a lovely pile of barfed-up
> >mouse guts on your rug.
> >
>
> Besides which any cat I've ever had only ate HALF of the
> mouse, then generally tried to drop the other half on my
> face while I was asleep, or at least on my feet if I were
> awake...
>
They were overfed! :)
My cats will eat a mouse and leave not even the squeak. I did, however, have
a cat who would hunt for chipmunks and deposit them in my brother's bed. I
guess she liked him. But we never had a vermin problem.
Same here, there used to be mice, but I have a good mouser and 2 kittens
plus a tiny terrier who will chase mice (she caught a runaway hamster once).
I'm frugal, no pets here that can't earn their keep!!!!

Chloe
July 9th 03, 09:30 PM
"Nina" > wrote in message
t...
>
> "Chloe" > wrote
> >
> > Yep, but it helps to remember it's just their way of saying they care
> enough
> > to bring the very best <g>. Seriously, I've read that when they bring
prey
> > to their favorite human it's modeling what they did as kittens to show
mom
> > they'd learned how to hunt.
> >
> More Back in GA anecdotes.
> When I was a kid,my cat would hunt snaked and deposit them between the
front
> door and the screen door. My mother REALLY loved that!

That was one of *my* mother's enduring childhood memories of the big farm
cat that sort of became a house cat (I guess a not unusual occurrence on
farms, where one cat manages to separate itself from the common herd) often
walking into the kitchen and bringing *her* mother a half dead snake in its
mouth. I can see how something like that would really stay with you <g>.

Chloe
July 9th 03, 09:30 PM
"Nina" > wrote in message
t...
>
> "Chloe" > wrote
> >
> > Yep, but it helps to remember it's just their way of saying they care
> enough
> > to bring the very best <g>. Seriously, I've read that when they bring
prey
> > to their favorite human it's modeling what they did as kittens to show
mom
> > they'd learned how to hunt.
> >
> More Back in GA anecdotes.
> When I was a kid,my cat would hunt snaked and deposit them between the
front
> door and the screen door. My mother REALLY loved that!

That was one of *my* mother's enduring childhood memories of the big farm
cat that sort of became a house cat (I guess a not unusual occurrence on
farms, where one cat manages to separate itself from the common herd) often
walking into the kitchen and bringing *her* mother a half dead snake in its
mouth. I can see how something like that would really stay with you <g>.

Chloe
July 9th 03, 09:30 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 18:22:22 GMT, "Chloe"
> > wrote:
>
>
> >
> >Yep, but it helps to remember it's just their way of saying they care
enough
> >to bring the very best <g>. Seriously, I've read that when they bring
prey
> >to their favorite human it's modeling what they did as kittens to show
mom
> >they'd learned how to hunt.
>
> Ms. Katycat actually gave the DOGS a mouse once, I saw her.
> I was on the deck and so were the dogs. Katy jumped up on
> the deck, with a mouse in her mouth, and dropped it right in
> front of the two dogs, who were lying down next to each
> other.
>
> The dogs were initially confused (not to say stunned -
> 'Look, Mom, Ms. Katycat brought us a mousie! WOW! What a
> nice surprise!') and then Sean (the collie) picked it up and
> started prancing around with it in his mouth. He dropped it
> when I told him to (good dog!).
>
> I disposed of it and spoiled all the fun.

Now, that is one hilarious scene to picture.

I sometimes wonder what our three would do with a dog...nah...that's *not* a
pretty picture <g>.

Chloe
July 9th 03, 09:30 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 18:22:22 GMT, "Chloe"
> > wrote:
>
>
> >
> >Yep, but it helps to remember it's just their way of saying they care
enough
> >to bring the very best <g>. Seriously, I've read that when they bring
prey
> >to their favorite human it's modeling what they did as kittens to show
mom
> >they'd learned how to hunt.
>
> Ms. Katycat actually gave the DOGS a mouse once, I saw her.
> I was on the deck and so were the dogs. Katy jumped up on
> the deck, with a mouse in her mouth, and dropped it right in
> front of the two dogs, who were lying down next to each
> other.
>
> The dogs were initially confused (not to say stunned -
> 'Look, Mom, Ms. Katycat brought us a mousie! WOW! What a
> nice surprise!') and then Sean (the collie) picked it up and
> started prancing around with it in his mouth. He dropped it
> when I told him to (good dog!).
>
> I disposed of it and spoiled all the fun.

Now, that is one hilarious scene to picture.

I sometimes wonder what our three would do with a dog...nah...that's *not* a
pretty picture <g>.

Bob
July 10th 03, 07:40 PM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...

> Anybody who can't afford to throw away a used mousetrap is spending way
> too much money on something less useful.

I'd say that anyone too squeemish to empty a mousetrap has a problem. At one
time I had mice in my garage. I would have had to buy 10-12 traps to get
them all your way. Instead, I reused 2 and got them all in a few days.

Bob

Bob
July 10th 03, 07:40 PM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...

> Anybody who can't afford to throw away a used mousetrap is spending way
> too much money on something less useful.

I'd say that anyone too squeemish to empty a mousetrap has a problem. At one
time I had mice in my garage. I would have had to buy 10-12 traps to get
them all your way. Instead, I reused 2 and got them all in a few days.

Bob

John
July 10th 03, 08:15 PM
"Karen Wheless" > wrote in message
news:1fxsclh.1mm46b7o20lauN%[email protected] net...
> I've had the occasional bug in my apartment, but never a mouse. (My
> apartment is a free standing cinder block apartment, converted from a
> garage, with a cement floor). But today, I saw one run right across my
> kitchen floor. Eeeek. (I'm not really someone who jumps on chairs to
> get away from mice, but I don't want one sharing my apartment with me).
>
> I checked my food - I had a few things stored on the floor, but none of
> it was touched. I have a very small kitchen and no cabinets, so my food
> is stored on open shelving, but only a couple of things were on the
> bottom shelf or on the floor, all in sealed containers, but I moved
> those up onto the counter for now. I wonder if the mouse was driven in
> because the outside of my apartment was "power washed" today, in
> preparation for repainting - but I don't know how it got in, I don't see
> any gaps or holes around the cement foundation or the cinder block
> walls. Although I suppose there must be a hole somewhere for the
> plumbing pipes.
>
> What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
> message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
> thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
> repellant to put across my bedroom door?
>
> Karen
>

Send them to me. Though my snake is bigger now, he still eats mice
sometimes.

John

John
July 10th 03, 08:15 PM
"Karen Wheless" > wrote in message
news:1fxsclh.1mm46b7o20lauN%[email protected] net...
> I've had the occasional bug in my apartment, but never a mouse. (My
> apartment is a free standing cinder block apartment, converted from a
> garage, with a cement floor). But today, I saw one run right across my
> kitchen floor. Eeeek. (I'm not really someone who jumps on chairs to
> get away from mice, but I don't want one sharing my apartment with me).
>
> I checked my food - I had a few things stored on the floor, but none of
> it was touched. I have a very small kitchen and no cabinets, so my food
> is stored on open shelving, but only a couple of things were on the
> bottom shelf or on the floor, all in sealed containers, but I moved
> those up onto the counter for now. I wonder if the mouse was driven in
> because the outside of my apartment was "power washed" today, in
> preparation for repainting - but I don't know how it got in, I don't see
> any gaps or holes around the cement foundation or the cinder block
> walls. Although I suppose there must be a hole somewhere for the
> plumbing pipes.
>
> What should I do? My landlord is in town so I left her a rather urgent
> message about my new vistor, but she's rather slow about this kind of
> thing - do those cheap mouse traps really work? Any anti-mouse
> repellant to put across my bedroom door?
>
> Karen
>

Send them to me. Though my snake is bigger now, he still eats mice
sometimes.

John

The Real Bev
July 10th 03, 09:15 PM
Bob wrote:
>
> "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> ...
>
> > Anybody who can't afford to throw away a used mousetrap is spending way
> > too much money on something less useful.
>
> I'd say that anyone too squeemish to empty a mousetrap has a problem. At one
> time I had mice in my garage. I would have had to buy 10-12 traps to get
> them all your way. Instead, I reused 2 and got them all in a few days.

And that would have cost what, $5? The mouse that I caught by the nose
JUMPED at me when I went to pick it up. D-Con Forever!

I did train myself to pick up worms, though, and even disourse about their
beauty. It was a survival measure -- kids are good at finding the chinks
in the armor!

--
Cheers,
Bev
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Of course SoCal has four seasons:
Earthquake, Mudslide, Brushfire, and Riot

The Real Bev
July 10th 03, 09:15 PM
Bob wrote:
>
> "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> ...
>
> > Anybody who can't afford to throw away a used mousetrap is spending way
> > too much money on something less useful.
>
> I'd say that anyone too squeemish to empty a mousetrap has a problem. At one
> time I had mice in my garage. I would have had to buy 10-12 traps to get
> them all your way. Instead, I reused 2 and got them all in a few days.

And that would have cost what, $5? The mouse that I caught by the nose
JUMPED at me when I went to pick it up. D-Con Forever!

I did train myself to pick up worms, though, and even disourse about their
beauty. It was a survival measure -- kids are good at finding the chinks
in the armor!

--
Cheers,
Bev
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Of course SoCal has four seasons:
Earthquake, Mudslide, Brushfire, and Riot

jean and bill
July 10th 03, 11:39 PM
In article >,
says...
> do those cheap mouse traps really work?
>
We periodically get a mouse in our house, can't figure out where they
get in. DH bought a galvanized steel trap at Home Depot like this one:

http://www.biconet.com/traps/ketchAll.html

He paid about $10 for it, and it's reusable, plus you can transport the
mouse FAR away in it. (Don't try that with a shoebox, take my word for
it.) We also found one accidentally drowned in a bucket with about 3
inches of water in it, that method is virtually free.

Jeannie
--
To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

jean and bill
July 10th 03, 11:39 PM
In article >,
says...
> do those cheap mouse traps really work?
>
We periodically get a mouse in our house, can't figure out where they
get in. DH bought a galvanized steel trap at Home Depot like this one:

http://www.biconet.com/traps/ketchAll.html

He paid about $10 for it, and it's reusable, plus you can transport the
mouse FAR away in it. (Don't try that with a shoebox, take my word for
it.) We also found one accidentally drowned in a bucket with about 3
inches of water in it, that method is virtually free.

Jeannie
--
To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

Anthony Matonak
July 11th 03, 11:02 AM
jean and bill wrote:
> http://www.biconet.com/traps/ketchAll.html
>
> He paid about $10 for it, and it's reusable, plus you can transport the
> mouse FAR away in it.

Why transport it? Find a neighbor, friend or relative who owns a snake.

Anthony

Anthony Matonak
July 11th 03, 11:02 AM
jean and bill wrote:
> http://www.biconet.com/traps/ketchAll.html
>
> He paid about $10 for it, and it's reusable, plus you can transport the
> mouse FAR away in it.

Why transport it? Find a neighbor, friend or relative who owns a snake.

Anthony

dogsnus
July 11th 03, 12:02 PM
Dennis > wrote in
:

> On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 05:38:38 GMT, "Nina" >
> wrote:
>
>>I prefer when the cats eat them, nothin left but a little fur.
>
> Except for every now and then when you find a lovely pile of barfed-up
> mouse guts on your rug.

Or in the garage, just where you normally put your first step down
on the way to work. I seem to be special enough for the cat to save
the hind legs and liver and other gross ,internal organs to show off
for me; such as the kidneys and other yellow/green gross items.
Barf...
Terri

If it were not for my son, having a cat when he should
not have one in his apartment, we'd NOT have a cat at all.
I like cats, but not in my home.
Give me GSD dog hair 2x any day over a cat inna house.

Lots of reasons for that I won't go into right now.
Terri

dogsnus
July 11th 03, 12:02 PM
Dennis > wrote in
:

> On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 05:38:38 GMT, "Nina" >
> wrote:
>
>>I prefer when the cats eat them, nothin left but a little fur.
>
> Except for every now and then when you find a lovely pile of barfed-up
> mouse guts on your rug.

Or in the garage, just where you normally put your first step down
on the way to work. I seem to be special enough for the cat to save
the hind legs and liver and other gross ,internal organs to show off
for me; such as the kidneys and other yellow/green gross items.
Barf...
Terri

If it were not for my son, having a cat when he should
not have one in his apartment, we'd NOT have a cat at all.
I like cats, but not in my home.
Give me GSD dog hair 2x any day over a cat inna house.

Lots of reasons for that I won't go into right now.
Terri

dogsnus
July 11th 03, 12:05 PM
Pat Meadows > wrote in
:

>
snip
>
> Besides which any cat I've ever had only ate HALF of the
> mouse, then generally tried to drop the other half on my
> face while I was asleep, or at least on my feet if I were
> awake...
>

Try half eaten pocket gohpers on your bare leg whilst
wearing shorts.
And fling it up on the wall, blood and guts and all,
in surprise and disgust ,just as your were dozing in
the Barcalounger.

shudder...
Terri

dogsnus
July 11th 03, 12:05 PM
Pat Meadows > wrote in
:

>
snip
>
> Besides which any cat I've ever had only ate HALF of the
> mouse, then generally tried to drop the other half on my
> face while I was asleep, or at least on my feet if I were
> awake...
>

Try half eaten pocket gohpers on your bare leg whilst
wearing shorts.
And fling it up on the wall, blood and guts and all,
in surprise and disgust ,just as your were dozing in
the Barcalounger.

shudder...
Terri

Gary
July 11th 03, 02:44 PM
Why is this such a delima. Put out a trap and kill it. Snap traps work
fine, cost little and if you only have 1 mouse (unlikey) you can throw
dead mouse and trap away. Sticky traps sometimes work, but you still
have a dead mouse to look at and throw away.

(Karen Wheless) wrote in message >...
> I've had the occasional bug in my apartment, but never a mouse. (My
> apartment is a free standing cinder block apartment, converted from a
> garage, with a cement floor). But today, I saw one run right across my
> kitchen floor. Eeeek. (I'm not really someone who jumps on chairs to
> get away from mice, but I don't want one sharing my apartment with me).

Gary
July 11th 03, 02:44 PM
Why is this such a delima. Put out a trap and kill it. Snap traps work
fine, cost little and if you only have 1 mouse (unlikey) you can throw
dead mouse and trap away. Sticky traps sometimes work, but you still
have a dead mouse to look at and throw away.

(Karen Wheless) wrote in message >...
> I've had the occasional bug in my apartment, but never a mouse. (My
> apartment is a free standing cinder block apartment, converted from a
> garage, with a cement floor). But today, I saw one run right across my
> kitchen floor. Eeeek. (I'm not really someone who jumps on chairs to
> get away from mice, but I don't want one sharing my apartment with me).

The Real Bev
July 11th 03, 11:01 PM
dogsnus wrote:

> I once stopped at the mailbox on the way out of the driveway,
> traps an dall, and started back into the car only to discover
> a few pink baby mice falling out of my wheel well onto the
> road.
> No, I did NOT save them. It was @ 1/4 mile from the house.
> They( baby mice) were nature's future food fodder for
> indigenous speciec such as bats, fox, coyotes, bear, and sundry
> wild animals.
>
> Dennis, I would sure love to have your BBQ'd oyster technique!
> Of all the ways I've eaten oysters, this is not in any of my
> cook books, even Emeril's cookbook.
> How long? How many and just how do you cook them on the grill?
> I understood that cooking oysters raw would result in
> the shells naturally opening?
> Is this correct?
> Not?
> Terri
> Savoring the thought of yet another way of cooking shellfish.\

I'm clearly not the only one who sees a relationship between dead baby
mice and oysters.

--
Cheers,
Bev
================================================== ==================
"We thought of one of those discount store caskets, but, frankly, we
were worried about the quality." -- mortuary commercial

The Real Bev
July 11th 03, 11:01 PM
dogsnus wrote:

> I once stopped at the mailbox on the way out of the driveway,
> traps an dall, and started back into the car only to discover
> a few pink baby mice falling out of my wheel well onto the
> road.
> No, I did NOT save them. It was @ 1/4 mile from the house.
> They( baby mice) were nature's future food fodder for
> indigenous speciec such as bats, fox, coyotes, bear, and sundry
> wild animals.
>
> Dennis, I would sure love to have your BBQ'd oyster technique!
> Of all the ways I've eaten oysters, this is not in any of my
> cook books, even Emeril's cookbook.
> How long? How many and just how do you cook them on the grill?
> I understood that cooking oysters raw would result in
> the shells naturally opening?
> Is this correct?
> Not?
> Terri
> Savoring the thought of yet another way of cooking shellfish.\

I'm clearly not the only one who sees a relationship between dead baby
mice and oysters.

--
Cheers,
Bev
================================================== ==================
"We thought of one of those discount store caskets, but, frankly, we
were worried about the quality." -- mortuary commercial

Bob
July 12th 03, 03:01 AM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...

> And that would have cost what, $5?

Yep. Instead I spent nothing, since I have the traps already for just such
an occurance. Seems frugal to me. What's the big deal about emptying a mouse
trap?

Bob

Bob
July 12th 03, 03:01 AM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...

> And that would have cost what, $5?

Yep. Instead I spent nothing, since I have the traps already for just such
an occurance. Seems frugal to me. What's the big deal about emptying a mouse
trap?

Bob

The Real Bev
July 12th 03, 03:29 AM
Bob wrote:
>
> "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> >
> > And that would have cost what, $5?
>
> Yep. Instead I spent nothing, since I have the traps already for just such
> an occurance. Seems frugal to me. What's the big deal about emptying a mouse
> trap?

Fleas. Lice. Maggots. Creepy unknown icky gooey things.

Perhaps if we'd had that many mice I would have gotten used to removing
them, but there were only half a dozen or so. And I think I got the traps
(in unopened packages, of course) at a yard sale anyway.

--
Cheers, Bev
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
"I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we could to protect
our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security."
--Microsoft VP in charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.

The Real Bev
July 12th 03, 03:29 AM
Bob wrote:
>
> "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> >
> > And that would have cost what, $5?
>
> Yep. Instead I spent nothing, since I have the traps already for just such
> an occurance. Seems frugal to me. What's the big deal about emptying a mouse
> trap?

Fleas. Lice. Maggots. Creepy unknown icky gooey things.

Perhaps if we'd had that many mice I would have gotten used to removing
them, but there were only half a dozen or so. And I think I got the traps
(in unopened packages, of course) at a yard sale anyway.

--
Cheers, Bev
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
"I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we could to protect
our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security."
--Microsoft VP in charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.

The Real Bev
July 12th 03, 10:00 PM
wrote:
>
> In article >,
> The Real Bev > wrote:
>
> > I think you're supposed to hit them with a shovel or something equally
> > unpleasant. How do you know how hard to hit so they die quickly but don't
> > squirt?
>
> Drowning is more humane.

How do you know? I would think that it would take a period of struggle
and terror before death by drowning actually occurs. Having taken several
falls, I know that the time between being normal and suddenly being on the
ground is zero and I conclude that death by a sharp blow to the head would
be equally unnoticed.

--
Cheers,
Bev
************************************************** ***************
"...and then I'll become a veterinarian because I love children."
-- Julie Brown

The Real Bev
July 12th 03, 10:00 PM
wrote:
>
> In article >,
> The Real Bev > wrote:
>
> > I think you're supposed to hit them with a shovel or something equally
> > unpleasant. How do you know how hard to hit so they die quickly but don't
> > squirt?
>
> Drowning is more humane.

How do you know? I would think that it would take a period of struggle
and terror before death by drowning actually occurs. Having taken several
falls, I know that the time between being normal and suddenly being on the
ground is zero and I conclude that death by a sharp blow to the head would
be equally unnoticed.

--
Cheers,
Bev
************************************************** ***************
"...and then I'll become a veterinarian because I love children."
-- Julie Brown

July 12th 03, 10:37 PM
In article >,
The Real Bev > wrote:

> wrote:
> >
> > In article >,
> > The Real Bev > wrote:
> >
> > > I think you're supposed to hit them with a shovel or something
> > > equally unpleasant. How do you know how hard to hit so they die
> > > quickly but don't squirt?
> >
> > Drowning is more humane.
>
> How do you know?

There is a multi-page veterinary PDF document available online (sorry,
I no longer have the URL, but I got it from a newsgroup so maybe
someone else knows it) describing in detail different methods of
killing animals. It's quite lengthy; among other considerations, it
examines the assumed levels of suffering each method causes.

The most effective is a blow to the head, _but_ it must be properly
placed (near the brainstem, destroying an area called the atlas cluster
IIRC). Most untrained people (including me) lack the skill to do this
properly and thus likely cause the animal terrible fear and pain before
they finally manage to land a lethal blow--if they ever do. If you want
to know how to kill mice most efficiently, take a biotech lab class.
Some students get very good at it. Using a shovel on a mouse would just
as likely kill from massive internal injury as from anything else, and
that could take a while.

But hey, a shovel still beats multiple, badly aimed crossbow bolts. And
besides we're talking about eradicating a pest, so kill it however your
conscience allows.

July 12th 03, 10:37 PM
In article >,
The Real Bev > wrote:

> wrote:
> >
> > In article >,
> > The Real Bev > wrote:
> >
> > > I think you're supposed to hit them with a shovel or something
> > > equally unpleasant. How do you know how hard to hit so they die
> > > quickly but don't squirt?
> >
> > Drowning is more humane.
>
> How do you know?

There is a multi-page veterinary PDF document available online (sorry,
I no longer have the URL, but I got it from a newsgroup so maybe
someone else knows it) describing in detail different methods of
killing animals. It's quite lengthy; among other considerations, it
examines the assumed levels of suffering each method causes.

The most effective is a blow to the head, _but_ it must be properly
placed (near the brainstem, destroying an area called the atlas cluster
IIRC). Most untrained people (including me) lack the skill to do this
properly and thus likely cause the animal terrible fear and pain before
they finally manage to land a lethal blow--if they ever do. If you want
to know how to kill mice most efficiently, take a biotech lab class.
Some students get very good at it. Using a shovel on a mouse would just
as likely kill from massive internal injury as from anything else, and
that could take a while.

But hey, a shovel still beats multiple, badly aimed crossbow bolts. And
besides we're talking about eradicating a pest, so kill it however your
conscience allows.

Sewmaster
July 13th 03, 12:48 AM
The Real Bev wrote:
> >
> > No, sticky traps leave you with a LIVE, squirming mouse to throw into a
> > garbage can, still alive. Snap-traps are better for all involved I think.
>
> I think you're supposed to hit them with a shovel or something equally
> unpleasant. How do you know how hard to hit so they die quickly but don't
> squirt?
>
> --
> Cheers, Bev

My aim isn't that good. Back when I used glue traps, I drowned 'em.
It was quick.

Sewmaster

Sewmaster
July 13th 03, 12:48 AM
The Real Bev wrote:
> >
> > No, sticky traps leave you with a LIVE, squirming mouse to throw into a
> > garbage can, still alive. Snap-traps are better for all involved I think.
>
> I think you're supposed to hit them with a shovel or something equally
> unpleasant. How do you know how hard to hit so they die quickly but don't
> squirt?
>
> --
> Cheers, Bev

My aim isn't that good. Back when I used glue traps, I drowned 'em.
It was quick.

Sewmaster

Don K
July 13th 03, 02:33 AM
"Sewmaster" > wrote in message
...
> The Real Bev wrote:
> > >
> > > No, sticky traps leave you with a LIVE, squirming mouse to throw into
a
> > > garbage can, still alive. Snap-traps are better for all involved I
think.
> >
> > I think you're supposed to hit them with a shovel or something equally
> > unpleasant. How do you know how hard to hit so they die quickly but
don't
> > squirt?
> >
> > --
> > Cheers, Bev
>
> My aim isn't that good. Back when I used glue traps, I drowned 'em.
> It was quick.
>
> Sewmaster

And add a few carrots and potatoes....?

Don

Don K
July 13th 03, 02:33 AM
"Sewmaster" > wrote in message
...
> The Real Bev wrote:
> > >
> > > No, sticky traps leave you with a LIVE, squirming mouse to throw into
a
> > > garbage can, still alive. Snap-traps are better for all involved I
think.
> >
> > I think you're supposed to hit them with a shovel or something equally
> > unpleasant. How do you know how hard to hit so they die quickly but
don't
> > squirt?
> >
> > --
> > Cheers, Bev
>
> My aim isn't that good. Back when I used glue traps, I drowned 'em.
> It was quick.
>
> Sewmaster

And add a few carrots and potatoes....?

Don

SoCalMike
July 13th 03, 04:10 AM
"suzn" > wrote in message
et...
>
> "Gary" > wrote in message
> om...
> > Why is this such a delima. Put out a trap and kill it. Snap traps work
> > fine, cost little and if you only have 1 mouse (unlikey) you can throw
> > dead mouse and trap away. Sticky traps sometimes work, but you still
> > have a dead mouse to look at and throw away.
>
>
> Yuck...have you ever used those sticky traps? They don't kill the little
> critter instantly like most snap traps do. Those sticky traps let the
little
> critter suffer while trying to remove him/her self from the trap only to
rip
> off their little arms, legs, tails or whatever else is stuck. Its gross
and
> definitely unnecessary unless you like that type of entertainment.

its frugal entertainment!

SoCalMike
July 13th 03, 04:10 AM
"suzn" > wrote in message
et...
>
> "Gary" > wrote in message
> om...
> > Why is this such a delima. Put out a trap and kill it. Snap traps work
> > fine, cost little and if you only have 1 mouse (unlikey) you can throw
> > dead mouse and trap away. Sticky traps sometimes work, but you still
> > have a dead mouse to look at and throw away.
>
>
> Yuck...have you ever used those sticky traps? They don't kill the little
> critter instantly like most snap traps do. Those sticky traps let the
little
> critter suffer while trying to remove him/her self from the trap only to
rip
> off their little arms, legs, tails or whatever else is stuck. Its gross
and
> definitely unnecessary unless you like that type of entertainment.

its frugal entertainment!

The Real Bev
July 13th 03, 06:48 AM
timeOday wrote:
>
> wrote:
>
> > The most effective is a blow to the head, _but_ it must be properly
> > placed (near the brainstem, destroying an area called the atlas cluster
> > IIRC). Most untrained people (including me) lack the skill to do this
> > properly and thus likely cause the animal terrible fear and pain before
> > they finally manage to land a lethal blow--if they ever do. If you want
> > to know how to kill mice most efficiently, take a biotech lab class.
> > Some students get very good at it. Using a shovel on a mouse would just
> > as likely kill from massive internal injury as from anything else, and
> > that could take a while.
>
> I'll bet a snap-trap is practically instant. Whap! They really do snap
> the back.

Unless they snap the nose :-(

--
Cheers,
Bev
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
"The language of victimization is infinitely extensible." -- Me

The Real Bev
July 13th 03, 06:48 AM
timeOday wrote:
>
> wrote:
>
> > The most effective is a blow to the head, _but_ it must be properly
> > placed (near the brainstem, destroying an area called the atlas cluster
> > IIRC). Most untrained people (including me) lack the skill to do this
> > properly and thus likely cause the animal terrible fear and pain before
> > they finally manage to land a lethal blow--if they ever do. If you want
> > to know how to kill mice most efficiently, take a biotech lab class.
> > Some students get very good at it. Using a shovel on a mouse would just
> > as likely kill from massive internal injury as from anything else, and
> > that could take a while.
>
> I'll bet a snap-trap is practically instant. Whap! They really do snap
> the back.

Unless they snap the nose :-(

--
Cheers,
Bev
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
"The language of victimization is infinitely extensible." -- Me

Bob
July 22nd 03, 05:36 AM
"suzn" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]

> Yesterday morning DH let one of my cats outdoors then back in the house
when
> he got up at 5:30a.m. The cat came into the bedroom and although it was
dark
> I could see he was playing with something. I turned on the light and he
had
> a small rat tossing it in the air. I was soooo glad he didnt jump in bed
> with me as he normally does every morning! I yelled for DH and he quickly
> removed the cat and the rat. Luckily the rat was dead. I shudder to think
> had he placed that rat on my pillow.....

I had one housemate's cat leave a dead mouse under the other housemate's
pillow once. He was not amused.

Bob

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