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July 9th 03, 06:31 AM
(Lowell Wilson) wrote:

>Does anybody have a good source of grassfed meat that is priced so the
>average individual could afford?

SS is still alive, but when he commits suicide again you might try him.

Arrange with a farmer to grow a steer for you.

Arri London
July 10th 03, 12:59 AM
Lowell Wilson wrote:
>
> Does anybody have a good source of grassfed meat that is priced so the
> average individual could afford?

The average individual can afford grassfed meat. Just not
every day. Eat less and buy better!

Arri London
July 10th 03, 12:59 AM
Lowell Wilson wrote:
>
> Does anybody have a good source of grassfed meat that is priced so the
> average individual could afford?

The average individual can afford grassfed meat. Just not
every day. Eat less and buy better!

Tsu Dho Poster
July 11th 03, 04:56 PM
"Arri London" > wrote in message
...
> Lowell Wilson wrote:
> >
> > Does anybody have a good source of grassfed meat that is priced so the
> > average individual could afford?
>
> The average individual can afford grassfed meat. Just not
> every day. Eat less and buy better!
>
Ditto. Smaller portions, in stir frying with fresh veggies.

Tsu Dho Poster
July 11th 03, 04:56 PM
"Arri London" > wrote in message
...
> Lowell Wilson wrote:
> >
> > Does anybody have a good source of grassfed meat that is priced so the
> > average individual could afford?
>
> The average individual can afford grassfed meat. Just not
> every day. Eat less and buy better!
>
Ditto. Smaller portions, in stir frying with fresh veggies.

Tsu Dho Poster
July 12th 03, 12:08 AM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 10:56:56 -0400, "Tsu Dho Poster"
> > wrote:
>
> >
> >"Arri London" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> Lowell Wilson wrote:
> >> >
> >> > Does anybody have a good source of grassfed meat that is priced so
the
> >> > average individual could afford?
> >>
> >> The average individual can afford grassfed meat. Just not
> >> every day. Eat less and buy better!
> >>
> >Ditto. Smaller portions, in stir frying with fresh veggies.
> >
>
> Or in soups, or stews, or chilis - all good ways to
> 'stretch' meat - the meat is used mostly for flavor, not for
> bulk.
>
I'm not "gifted" enuf to make a decent stew..or even chili. (dam shame when
even Wendys chili is tastier than mine) :-)

Tsu Dho Poster
July 12th 03, 12:08 AM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 10:56:56 -0400, "Tsu Dho Poster"
> > wrote:
>
> >
> >"Arri London" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> Lowell Wilson wrote:
> >> >
> >> > Does anybody have a good source of grassfed meat that is priced so
the
> >> > average individual could afford?
> >>
> >> The average individual can afford grassfed meat. Just not
> >> every day. Eat less and buy better!
> >>
> >Ditto. Smaller portions, in stir frying with fresh veggies.
> >
>
> Or in soups, or stews, or chilis - all good ways to
> 'stretch' meat - the meat is used mostly for flavor, not for
> bulk.
>
I'm not "gifted" enuf to make a decent stew..or even chili. (dam shame when
even Wendys chili is tastier than mine) :-)

The Real Bev
July 12th 03, 12:28 AM
Tsu Dho Poster wrote:

> I'm not "gifted" enuf to make a decent stew..or even chili. (dam shame when
> even Wendys chili is tastier than mine) :-)

I can top that. When he was little, my son asked me why I couldn't make
good spaghetti like the school does.

--
Cheers,
Bev
MSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMS MSMSMSMSMSMS
FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION. It comes bundled with the software.

The Real Bev
July 12th 03, 12:28 AM
Tsu Dho Poster wrote:

> I'm not "gifted" enuf to make a decent stew..or even chili. (dam shame when
> even Wendys chili is tastier than mine) :-)

I can top that. When he was little, my son asked me why I couldn't make
good spaghetti like the school does.

--
Cheers,
Bev
MSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMS MSMSMSMSMSMS
FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION. It comes bundled with the software.

July 12th 03, 01:08 AM
The Real Bev > wrote:

>I can top that. When he was little, my son asked me why I couldn't make
>good spaghetti like the school does.

OUCH! ROTFL!

July 12th 03, 01:08 AM
The Real Bev > wrote:

>I can top that. When he was little, my son asked me why I couldn't make
>good spaghetti like the school does.

OUCH! ROTFL!

Arri London
July 12th 03, 01:26 AM
Tsu Dho Poster wrote:
>
> "Arri London" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Lowell Wilson wrote:
> > >
> > > Does anybody have a good source of grassfed meat that is priced so the
> > > average individual could afford?
> >
> > The average individual can afford grassfed meat. Just not
> > every day. Eat less and buy better!
> >
> Ditto. Smaller portions, in stir frying with fresh veggies.

One pound of any sort of fresh meat will serve the two of us
(and scraps for the two cats) for a few meals.
We don't eat beef, but we do buy good pork, chicken and
lamb. It's not worth buying the nasty cheap meat. Doesn't
taste very good, watery and full of unnecessary chemicals.

Arri London
July 12th 03, 01:26 AM
Tsu Dho Poster wrote:
>
> "Arri London" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Lowell Wilson wrote:
> > >
> > > Does anybody have a good source of grassfed meat that is priced so the
> > > average individual could afford?
> >
> > The average individual can afford grassfed meat. Just not
> > every day. Eat less and buy better!
> >
> Ditto. Smaller portions, in stir frying with fresh veggies.

One pound of any sort of fresh meat will serve the two of us
(and scraps for the two cats) for a few meals.
We don't eat beef, but we do buy good pork, chicken and
lamb. It's not worth buying the nasty cheap meat. Doesn't
taste very good, watery and full of unnecessary chemicals.

Arri London
July 12th 03, 01:39 AM
Tsu Dho Poster wrote:
>
> "Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 10:56:56 -0400, "Tsu Dho Poster"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >
> > >"Arri London" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > >> Lowell Wilson wrote:
> > >> >
> > >> > Does anybody have a good source of grassfed meat that is priced so
> the
> > >> > average individual could afford?
> > >>
> > >> The average individual can afford grassfed meat. Just not
> > >> every day. Eat less and buy better!
> > >>
> > >Ditto. Smaller portions, in stir frying with fresh veggies.
> > >
> >
> > Or in soups, or stews, or chilis - all good ways to
> > 'stretch' meat - the meat is used mostly for flavor, not for
> > bulk.
> >
> I'm not "gifted" enuf to make a decent stew..or even chili. (dam shame when
> even Wendys chili is tastier than mine) :-)


LOL! Come on... easy to do.

Generic stew

1 lb meat, cut into small cubes or strips
1 onion chopped
2 stalks celery, sliced thin
2 large carrots (can use the old woody ones you forgot in
the veg bin) sliced or chopped
2 largish potatoes sliced or chopped
few cloves of garlic smashed
3 cups broth, water or tomato sauce (more if you need to
stretch this)
veg oil
salt, pepper and herbs of choice

In a heavy pan, heat some veg oil (Tbs or 2) and lightly
brown the pieces of meat without burning them.
Remove the meat and in the same oil, lightly brown the
vegetables (including the potatoes or else add them later)
and a little of the garlic. Add back the meat.
Add the liquid, cover and simmer the mix for 30 mins. Taste
and add the seasonings (and the potatoes if you waited) and
simmer until everything is cooked through. Add the rest of
the garlic (browned or raw) 10 mins or so before serving.

As part of a meal with good bread and a salad, will serve 6.
Make some plain dumplings and it will serve more.

Arri London
July 12th 03, 01:39 AM
Tsu Dho Poster wrote:
>
> "Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 10:56:56 -0400, "Tsu Dho Poster"
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >
> > >"Arri London" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > >> Lowell Wilson wrote:
> > >> >
> > >> > Does anybody have a good source of grassfed meat that is priced so
> the
> > >> > average individual could afford?
> > >>
> > >> The average individual can afford grassfed meat. Just not
> > >> every day. Eat less and buy better!
> > >>
> > >Ditto. Smaller portions, in stir frying with fresh veggies.
> > >
> >
> > Or in soups, or stews, or chilis - all good ways to
> > 'stretch' meat - the meat is used mostly for flavor, not for
> > bulk.
> >
> I'm not "gifted" enuf to make a decent stew..or even chili. (dam shame when
> even Wendys chili is tastier than mine) :-)


LOL! Come on... easy to do.

Generic stew

1 lb meat, cut into small cubes or strips
1 onion chopped
2 stalks celery, sliced thin
2 large carrots (can use the old woody ones you forgot in
the veg bin) sliced or chopped
2 largish potatoes sliced or chopped
few cloves of garlic smashed
3 cups broth, water or tomato sauce (more if you need to
stretch this)
veg oil
salt, pepper and herbs of choice

In a heavy pan, heat some veg oil (Tbs or 2) and lightly
brown the pieces of meat without burning them.
Remove the meat and in the same oil, lightly brown the
vegetables (including the potatoes or else add them later)
and a little of the garlic. Add back the meat.
Add the liquid, cover and simmer the mix for 30 mins. Taste
and add the seasonings (and the potatoes if you waited) and
simmer until everything is cooked through. Add the rest of
the garlic (browned or raw) 10 mins or so before serving.

As part of a meal with good bread and a salad, will serve 6.
Make some plain dumplings and it will serve more.

Arri London
July 13th 03, 01:34 AM
Pat Meadows wrote:
>
> On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 17:39:34 -0600, Arri London
> > wrote:
>
> >
> >Generic stew
> >
> >1 lb meat, cut into small cubes or strips
> >1 onion chopped
> >2 stalks celery, sliced thin
> >2 large carrots (can use the old woody ones you forgot in
> >the veg bin) sliced or chopped
> >2 largish potatoes sliced or chopped
> >few cloves of garlic smashed
> >3 cups broth, water or tomato sauce (more if you need to
> >stretch this)
> >veg oil
> >salt, pepper and herbs of choice
> >
> >In a heavy pan, heat some veg oil (Tbs or 2) and lightly
> >brown the pieces of meat without burning them.
> >Remove the meat and in the same oil, lightly brown the
> >vegetables (including the potatoes or else add them later)
> >and a little of the garlic. Add back the meat.
> >Add the liquid, cover and simmer the mix for 30 mins. Taste
> >and add the seasonings (and the potatoes if you waited) and
> >simmer until everything is cooked through. Add the rest of
> >the garlic (browned or raw) 10 mins or so before serving.
> >
> >As part of a meal with good bread and a salad, will serve 6.
> >Make some plain dumplings and it will serve more.
>
> You don't need to brown the meat, even. I make stew in the
> crockpot or pressure cooker: in either case, I don't bother
> to brown the meat. It's a teeny bit less flavorful, but not
> much.
>
> Basically, my stew is the same ingredients but instead of
> water I use a couple of cans of whole tomatoes. And I don't
> put garlic in stew, but do add a bayleaf.
>
> Pat

Ah well.. habits die hard. I was taught to brown meat before
stewing except for certain dishes. Even if I use a crockpot,
I will brown the meat first.
For such a plain stew I do like a lot of garlic in it. When
the budget stretches to more interesting ingredients, I
might leave it out.
Bayleaf goes under 'herbs of choice'. I like my Turkish
bayleaves but sometimes they can get very strong.
Not so fond of canned tomatoes , so don't normally cook with
them. but Did make a quick salsa from some I found in the
cupboard; wasn't too bad. We just don't have any ripe in the
garden yet.

Arri London
July 13th 03, 01:34 AM
Pat Meadows wrote:
>
> On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 17:39:34 -0600, Arri London
> > wrote:
>
> >
> >Generic stew
> >
> >1 lb meat, cut into small cubes or strips
> >1 onion chopped
> >2 stalks celery, sliced thin
> >2 large carrots (can use the old woody ones you forgot in
> >the veg bin) sliced or chopped
> >2 largish potatoes sliced or chopped
> >few cloves of garlic smashed
> >3 cups broth, water or tomato sauce (more if you need to
> >stretch this)
> >veg oil
> >salt, pepper and herbs of choice
> >
> >In a heavy pan, heat some veg oil (Tbs or 2) and lightly
> >brown the pieces of meat without burning them.
> >Remove the meat and in the same oil, lightly brown the
> >vegetables (including the potatoes or else add them later)
> >and a little of the garlic. Add back the meat.
> >Add the liquid, cover and simmer the mix for 30 mins. Taste
> >and add the seasonings (and the potatoes if you waited) and
> >simmer until everything is cooked through. Add the rest of
> >the garlic (browned or raw) 10 mins or so before serving.
> >
> >As part of a meal with good bread and a salad, will serve 6.
> >Make some plain dumplings and it will serve more.
>
> You don't need to brown the meat, even. I make stew in the
> crockpot or pressure cooker: in either case, I don't bother
> to brown the meat. It's a teeny bit less flavorful, but not
> much.
>
> Basically, my stew is the same ingredients but instead of
> water I use a couple of cans of whole tomatoes. And I don't
> put garlic in stew, but do add a bayleaf.
>
> Pat

Ah well.. habits die hard. I was taught to brown meat before
stewing except for certain dishes. Even if I use a crockpot,
I will brown the meat first.
For such a plain stew I do like a lot of garlic in it. When
the budget stretches to more interesting ingredients, I
might leave it out.
Bayleaf goes under 'herbs of choice'. I like my Turkish
bayleaves but sometimes they can get very strong.
Not so fond of canned tomatoes , so don't normally cook with
them. but Did make a quick salsa from some I found in the
cupboard; wasn't too bad. We just don't have any ripe in the
garden yet.

George
July 13th 03, 03:59 PM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...
> Tsu Dho Poster wrote:
>
> > I'm not "gifted" enuf to make a decent stew..or even chili. (dam shame
when
> > even Wendys chili is tastier than mine) :-)
>
> I can top that. When he was little, my son asked me why I couldn't make
> good spaghetti like the school does.

Not necessarily bad. The "school grade spaghetti" may have been the typical
sweetened stuff with no other perceivable taste except the sugar..


> --
> Cheers,
> Bev
> MSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMS MSMSMSMSMSMS
> FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION. It comes bundled with the software.

George
July 13th 03, 03:59 PM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...
> Tsu Dho Poster wrote:
>
> > I'm not "gifted" enuf to make a decent stew..or even chili. (dam shame
when
> > even Wendys chili is tastier than mine) :-)
>
> I can top that. When he was little, my son asked me why I couldn't make
> good spaghetti like the school does.

Not necessarily bad. The "school grade spaghetti" may have been the typical
sweetened stuff with no other perceivable taste except the sugar..


> --
> Cheers,
> Bev
> MSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMSMS MSMSMSMSMSMS
> FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION. It comes bundled with the software.

Karen Wheless
July 14th 03, 04:01 AM
> > I'm still smarting from last time..when I bought some of that stewing beef,
> > "organic", hi-priced stuff. Was told to cook it for several hours, so I
> > got busy doing something else....& sorta forgot about it....became
> > "leatherized" (lol)
> >
> > The only stew I know of is beef....what other meats do you use that only
> > takes 30 minutes to cook??
>
> Any meat, if the pieces are cut small enough!
> Same for stir-fry. Cut the pieces small and all will be
> cooked within minutes.

However, cheap cuts of meat often benefit from long periods of cooking.
They become a lot more tender and flavorful.

My favorite stew recipe starts by quickly browning the meat, but then
it's cooked in the oven (at a relatively low temperature) for 2-3 hours.
The meat becomes very tender and flavorful. But you have to use the
right cut of meat. Chuck is good for long, slow cooking.

Karen

Karen Wheless
July 14th 03, 04:01 AM
> > I'm still smarting from last time..when I bought some of that stewing beef,
> > "organic", hi-priced stuff. Was told to cook it for several hours, so I
> > got busy doing something else....& sorta forgot about it....became
> > "leatherized" (lol)
> >
> > The only stew I know of is beef....what other meats do you use that only
> > takes 30 minutes to cook??
>
> Any meat, if the pieces are cut small enough!
> Same for stir-fry. Cut the pieces small and all will be
> cooked within minutes.

However, cheap cuts of meat often benefit from long periods of cooking.
They become a lot more tender and flavorful.

My favorite stew recipe starts by quickly browning the meat, but then
it's cooked in the oven (at a relatively low temperature) for 2-3 hours.
The meat becomes very tender and flavorful. But you have to use the
right cut of meat. Chuck is good for long, slow cooking.

Karen

Arri London
July 15th 03, 12:02 AM
Karen Wheless wrote:
>
> > > I'm still smarting from last time..when I bought some of that stewing beef,
> > > "organic", hi-priced stuff. Was told to cook it for several hours, so I
> > > got busy doing something else....& sorta forgot about it....became
> > > "leatherized" (lol)
> > >
> > > The only stew I know of is beef....what other meats do you use that only
> > > takes 30 minutes to cook??
> >
> > Any meat, if the pieces are cut small enough!
> > Same for stir-fry. Cut the pieces small and all will be
> > cooked within minutes.
>
> However, cheap cuts of meat often benefit from long periods of cooking.
> They become a lot more tender and flavorful.

That's true. But as a student, I bought the cheapest cuts of
meat, whenever I bought meat. Cut small enough they remained
tender in stirfry dishes.

>
> My favorite stew recipe starts by quickly browning the meat, but then
> it's cooked in the oven (at a relatively low temperature) for 2-3 hours.
> The meat becomes very tender and flavorful. But you have to use the
> right cut of meat. Chuck is good for long, slow cooking.
>
> Karen

Arri London
July 15th 03, 12:02 AM
Karen Wheless wrote:
>
> > > I'm still smarting from last time..when I bought some of that stewing beef,
> > > "organic", hi-priced stuff. Was told to cook it for several hours, so I
> > > got busy doing something else....& sorta forgot about it....became
> > > "leatherized" (lol)
> > >
> > > The only stew I know of is beef....what other meats do you use that only
> > > takes 30 minutes to cook??
> >
> > Any meat, if the pieces are cut small enough!
> > Same for stir-fry. Cut the pieces small and all will be
> > cooked within minutes.
>
> However, cheap cuts of meat often benefit from long periods of cooking.
> They become a lot more tender and flavorful.

That's true. But as a student, I bought the cheapest cuts of
meat, whenever I bought meat. Cut small enough they remained
tender in stirfry dishes.

>
> My favorite stew recipe starts by quickly browning the meat, but then
> it's cooked in the oven (at a relatively low temperature) for 2-3 hours.
> The meat becomes very tender and flavorful. But you have to use the
> right cut of meat. Chuck is good for long, slow cooking.
>
> Karen

Bob Ward
July 15th 03, 02:58 AM
On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 13:01:49 -0400, "Tsu Dho Poster"
> wrote:

>
>"Karen Wheless" > wrote in message news
>
>> My favorite stew recipe starts by quickly browning the meat, but then
>> it's cooked in the oven (at a relatively low temperature) for 2-3 hours.
>> The meat becomes very tender and flavorful. But you have to use the
>> right cut of meat. Chuck is good for long, slow cooking.
>>
>If u cook it in the oven....how does it become "stew" ??
>
Do you think that the heat from the oven is somehow different from the
heat generated by the burners on the range?

Do you also wonder where the bread went when you make toast?

Bob Ward
July 15th 03, 02:58 AM
On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 13:01:49 -0400, "Tsu Dho Poster"
> wrote:

>
>"Karen Wheless" > wrote in message news
>
>> My favorite stew recipe starts by quickly browning the meat, but then
>> it's cooked in the oven (at a relatively low temperature) for 2-3 hours.
>> The meat becomes very tender and flavorful. But you have to use the
>> right cut of meat. Chuck is good for long, slow cooking.
>>
>If u cook it in the oven....how does it become "stew" ??
>
Do you think that the heat from the oven is somehow different from the
heat generated by the burners on the range?

Do you also wonder where the bread went when you make toast?

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