PDA

View Full Version : Re: Frugal pools?


Paul Riddle
July 9th 03, 04:54 PM
In article >, > wrote:
wrote:
>
>>We are using granulated chlorine; is liquid a better value? (The solid
>>pucks seem expensive...)
>>
>
>Liquid chlorine is cheaper, but you have to get the cyanuric acid granules and
>have them around anyway. If you use liquid, you HAVE to keep it away from
>kids. Even adults will get chlorine holes in clothes and shoes when pouring it
>into a pool. A couple of lost garments or shoes pays for a fair amount of
>chemicals.

Yep.. liquid chlorine also has a short shelf life, so you have to buy
in relatively small quantities or it will lose potency in storage. Also,
it has a very high pH, which requires you to compensate by adding additional
acid to the pool to neutralize the pH.

Around here, the cheapest and most widely available form of pool chlorine
is granular calcium hypochlorite ("cal-hypo"). However, you really have
to shop around to get the best price, and read the labels closely as the
product is sold in various different concentrations. Most granular cal-hypo
products contain from 50-80% actual chlorine and 20-50% of "filler". The
idea is to find the product with the best price per unit of actual chlorine.
I use a simple formula to figure this out, which I can post if anyone
really cares :-)

This season, the best deal I found was 65% cal-hypo for $1/pound in
quantities of 100lbs or more. The stuff has a long shelf life, so you can
save money by stocking up.

>Now for a frugal tip especially for those who have let their (in ground) pools
>go seriously green, or can't seem to get ahead of the algae problem. :-(
>
> [ ... ]

This is a great idea; I will have to try it out. Normally I just vacuum
the stuff out the waste line, but that wastes an awful lot of water. Your
method sounds like it uses much less water. Thanks for the tip.

Paul

July 10th 03, 02:18 PM
On Wed, 9 Jul 2003 18:46:20 +0000 (UTC),
(Paul Riddle) wrote:

>I've never done a scientific study, but I've read that, when stored
>properly (in a cool, dry place), liquid chlorine will start to lose potency
>after 6 months or so. OTOH, I've used 2-year-old dry chlorine that was
>stored in my un-air-conditioned garage, and it seems to be as effective as
>new stuff. Just my experience.


I have numerous one year old gallons of chlorine that have converted
themselves to water. Found them in a dark closet in the garage, so the
sun didn't do it.

July 10th 03, 02:18 PM
On Wed, 9 Jul 2003 18:46:20 +0000 (UTC),
(Paul Riddle) wrote:

>I've never done a scientific study, but I've read that, when stored
>properly (in a cool, dry place), liquid chlorine will start to lose potency
>after 6 months or so. OTOH, I've used 2-year-old dry chlorine that was
>stored in my un-air-conditioned garage, and it seems to be as effective as
>new stuff. Just my experience.


I have numerous one year old gallons of chlorine that have converted
themselves to water. Found them in a dark closet in the garage, so the
sun didn't do it.

Google