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Bob Benjamin
July 13th 03, 10:04 AM
Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is there
anything else that I could use?

Michael Black
July 13th 03, 03:38 PM
Pat Meadows ) writes:
> On Sun, 13 Jul 2003 02:04:57 -0600, "Bob Benjamin"
> > wrote:
>
>>Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is there
>>anything else that I could use?
>>
>
>
> Shoe box. Any of numerous plastic containers sold for
> general purpose storage - they have plastic 'shoe boxes'
> now. Those would hold a lot of diskettes.
>
> Pat
I got this out of a magazine at one point, but index card boxes fit
3.5" disks just fine. Not the 3 x 5 inch, but the next size up.
When I was using a lot of those disks, I found the boxes for a couple
of dollars, and they worked out (and were cheaper) than the boxes
specifically to hold floppies.

Michael

Michael Black
July 13th 03, 03:38 PM
Pat Meadows ) writes:
> On Sun, 13 Jul 2003 02:04:57 -0600, "Bob Benjamin"
> > wrote:
>
>>Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is there
>>anything else that I could use?
>>
>
>
> Shoe box. Any of numerous plastic containers sold for
> general purpose storage - they have plastic 'shoe boxes'
> now. Those would hold a lot of diskettes.
>
> Pat
I got this out of a magazine at one point, but index card boxes fit
3.5" disks just fine. Not the 3 x 5 inch, but the next size up.
When I was using a lot of those disks, I found the boxes for a couple
of dollars, and they worked out (and were cheaper) than the boxes
specifically to hold floppies.

Michael

Pete Romfh
July 13th 03, 08:23 PM
Bob Benjamin wrote:
> Instead of buying a specially designed container for
> diskettes is there anything else that I could use?

The traditional hacker thing (for 3.5 inch floppies) was a Cheese Whiz box.
You can eat the big block of cheese about 100 different ways and store about
100 disks. Very Frugal! =;)

--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at Texas dot net

Pete Romfh
July 13th 03, 08:23 PM
Bob Benjamin wrote:
> Instead of buying a specially designed container for
> diskettes is there anything else that I could use?

The traditional hacker thing (for 3.5 inch floppies) was a Cheese Whiz box.
You can eat the big block of cheese about 100 different ways and store about
100 disks. Very Frugal! =;)

--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at Texas dot net

July 13th 03, 08:55 PM
"Bob Benjamin" > wrote:

>Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is there
>anything else that I could use?

Why not copy them to a CDR and be done with it?

If you have to keep them, the boxes business cards come in are a good fit.

July 13th 03, 08:55 PM
"Bob Benjamin" > wrote:

>Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is there
>anything else that I could use?

Why not copy them to a CDR and be done with it?

If you have to keep them, the boxes business cards come in are a good fit.

myname
July 14th 03, 01:25 AM
"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message >...
> Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is there
> anything else that I could use?

People still use diskettes?

When I assembled my computer, more or less myself, I didn't even both
installing the floppy drive. If I wanted to move a file from one
computer to another, I'd just email it.

myname
July 14th 03, 01:25 AM
"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message >...
> Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is there
> anything else that I could use?

People still use diskettes?

When I assembled my computer, more or less myself, I didn't even both
installing the floppy drive. If I wanted to move a file from one
computer to another, I'd just email it.

Pete Romfh
July 14th 03, 01:31 AM
Albert Wagner wrote:
> On Sun, 13 Jul 2003 13:23:19 -0500
> "Pete Romfh" > wrote:
>
>> Bob Benjamin wrote:
>>> Instead of buying a specially designed container for
>>> diskettes is there anything else that I could use?
>>
>> The traditional hacker thing (for 3.5 inch floppies) was
>> a Cheese Whiz box. You can eat the big block of cheese
>> about 100 different ways and store about 100 disks. Very
>> Frugal! =;)
>
> Perhaps you were referring to a Velveeta box. Cheese
> Whiz comes in a jar.
>>
>> --
>> Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
>> promfh at Texas dot net
You are absolutely correct.. Well, I remembered it was a cheese thing
anyway.
Of all the things I've lost I miss my mind the most.

--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at Texas dot net

Pete Romfh
July 14th 03, 01:31 AM
Albert Wagner wrote:
> On Sun, 13 Jul 2003 13:23:19 -0500
> "Pete Romfh" > wrote:
>
>> Bob Benjamin wrote:
>>> Instead of buying a specially designed container for
>>> diskettes is there anything else that I could use?
>>
>> The traditional hacker thing (for 3.5 inch floppies) was
>> a Cheese Whiz box. You can eat the big block of cheese
>> about 100 different ways and store about 100 disks. Very
>> Frugal! =;)
>
> Perhaps you were referring to a Velveeta box. Cheese
> Whiz comes in a jar.
>>
>> --
>> Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
>> promfh at Texas dot net
You are absolutely correct.. Well, I remembered it was a cheese thing
anyway.
Of all the things I've lost I miss my mind the most.

--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at Texas dot net

lpogoda
July 14th 03, 01:51 AM
myname wrote in message ...
>"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
>...
>> Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is there
>> anything else that I could use?
>
>People still use diskettes?
>
>When I assembled my computer, more or less myself, I didn't even both
>installing the floppy drive. If I wanted to move a file from one
>computer to another, I'd just email it.

A lot of email systems have limits on the size of attachments. At my
company, clients that we deal with often have such restrictions and such
emails simply "bounce". Even more frustrating is when the recipient's
system has virus checking software on emails that won't pass a compressed
and/or password protected file. Then there are clients whose policies
forbid emailing data connected with their business as a security measure.
File transfers, no matter how small the file, must be done via some variant
of snail mail.

lpogoda
July 14th 03, 01:51 AM
myname wrote in message ...
>"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
>...
>> Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is there
>> anything else that I could use?
>
>People still use diskettes?
>
>When I assembled my computer, more or less myself, I didn't even both
>installing the floppy drive. If I wanted to move a file from one
>computer to another, I'd just email it.

A lot of email systems have limits on the size of attachments. At my
company, clients that we deal with often have such restrictions and such
emails simply "bounce". Even more frustrating is when the recipient's
system has virus checking software on emails that won't pass a compressed
and/or password protected file. Then there are clients whose policies
forbid emailing data connected with their business as a security measure.
File transfers, no matter how small the file, must be done via some variant
of snail mail.

July 14th 03, 03:08 AM
"lpogoda" > wrote:

>Even more frustrating is when the recipient's
>system has virus checking software on emails that won't pass a compressed
>and/or password protected file.

Just rename the extension. I have to do that when a user's email won't accept
an .exe file.

July 14th 03, 03:08 AM
"lpogoda" > wrote:

>Even more frustrating is when the recipient's
>system has virus checking software on emails that won't pass a compressed
>and/or password protected file.

Just rename the extension. I have to do that when a user's email won't accept
an .exe file.

Nina
July 14th 03, 05:07 AM
upload to webspace then download later?
I havent used a floppy in years, I just email stuff. Once in school I would
use AIM (instant messenger) to send files from school to home. I made a new
account for receiving files and then set it so it would allow automatic file
transfers from my main account and no others. I'd log on at school and then
just send things that way. Pedestiran, but worked well w/in the limitations
of the schools systems.

"lpogoda" > wrote in message
...
>
> myname wrote in message ...
> >"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
> >...
> >> Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is there
> >> anything else that I could use?
> >
> >People still use diskettes?
> >
> >When I assembled my computer, more or less myself, I didn't even both
> >installing the floppy drive. If I wanted to move a file from one
> >computer to another, I'd just email it.
>
> A lot of email systems have limits on the size of attachments. At my
> company, clients that we deal with often have such restrictions and such
> emails simply "bounce". Even more frustrating is when the recipient's
> system has virus checking software on emails that won't pass a compressed
> and/or password protected file. Then there are clients whose policies
> forbid emailing data connected with their business as a security measure.
> File transfers, no matter how small the file, must be done via some
variant
> of snail mail.
>
>

Nina
July 14th 03, 05:07 AM
upload to webspace then download later?
I havent used a floppy in years, I just email stuff. Once in school I would
use AIM (instant messenger) to send files from school to home. I made a new
account for receiving files and then set it so it would allow automatic file
transfers from my main account and no others. I'd log on at school and then
just send things that way. Pedestiran, but worked well w/in the limitations
of the schools systems.

"lpogoda" > wrote in message
...
>
> myname wrote in message ...
> >"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
> >...
> >> Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is there
> >> anything else that I could use?
> >
> >People still use diskettes?
> >
> >When I assembled my computer, more or less myself, I didn't even both
> >installing the floppy drive. If I wanted to move a file from one
> >computer to another, I'd just email it.
>
> A lot of email systems have limits on the size of attachments. At my
> company, clients that we deal with often have such restrictions and such
> emails simply "bounce". Even more frustrating is when the recipient's
> system has virus checking software on emails that won't pass a compressed
> and/or password protected file. Then there are clients whose policies
> forbid emailing data connected with their business as a security measure.
> File transfers, no matter how small the file, must be done via some
variant
> of snail mail.
>
>

Don K
July 14th 03, 05:37 AM
"Nina" > wrote in message
...
> upload to webspace then download later?
> I havent used a floppy in years, I just email stuff. Once in school I
would
> use AIM (instant messenger) to send files from school to home. I made a
new
> account for receiving files and then set it so it would allow automatic
file
> transfers from my main account and no others. I'd log on at school and
then
> just send things that way. Pedestiran, but worked well w/in the
limitations
> of the schools systems.

All computers aren't hooked up to the internet at all times. The floppy
disk is doesn't hold much data, it's too slow, and it's obsolete.

But it's ubiquitous, it's cheap, and the transfer is private. You have to
assume anything sent over a network can be recorded and monitored.

Don

Don K
July 14th 03, 05:37 AM
"Nina" > wrote in message
...
> upload to webspace then download later?
> I havent used a floppy in years, I just email stuff. Once in school I
would
> use AIM (instant messenger) to send files from school to home. I made a
new
> account for receiving files and then set it so it would allow automatic
file
> transfers from my main account and no others. I'd log on at school and
then
> just send things that way. Pedestiran, but worked well w/in the
limitations
> of the schools systems.

All computers aren't hooked up to the internet at all times. The floppy
disk is doesn't hold much data, it's too slow, and it's obsolete.

But it's ubiquitous, it's cheap, and the transfer is private. You have to
assume anything sent over a network can be recorded and monitored.

Don

Dennis
July 14th 03, 07:05 PM
On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 10:15:27 -0400, Pat Meadows >
wrote:

>On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 03:07:09 GMT, "Nina"
> wrote:
>
>>upload to webspace then download later?
>
>This is what we do. We use FTP for this purpose.

I hate floppy disks and have only a slow dialup connection at home, so
I picked up a USB flash drive for moving files between home and work.
128M of flash memory on a finger-sized device that plugs into a USB
port, for $30. Looks like a removable disk drive to Windows. Very
handy.

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

Dennis
July 14th 03, 07:05 PM
On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 10:15:27 -0400, Pat Meadows >
wrote:

>On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 03:07:09 GMT, "Nina"
> wrote:
>
>>upload to webspace then download later?
>
>This is what we do. We use FTP for this purpose.

I hate floppy disks and have only a slow dialup connection at home, so
I picked up a USB flash drive for moving files between home and work.
128M of flash memory on a finger-sized device that plugs into a USB
port, for $30. Looks like a removable disk drive to Windows. Very
handy.

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

The Real Bev
July 14th 03, 09:26 PM
Gordon Reeder wrote:
>
> (myname) wrote:
>
> >"Bob Benjamin" > wrote:
> >
> >> Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is
> >> there anything else that I could use?
> >
> >People still use diskettes?
>
> I happen to have both 3.5" and 5.25" Floppy drives on my computer.
> But I don't get much milage out of them any more since I copied
> all the floppies (both sizes) onto CD-R.

Me too. I have both size floppies on my windows machine, but just a 3.5"
floppy on the linux machine. I have no idea what I'd need to get from a
5.25" floppy, but I know I'll find something as soon as I toss it. It's
not like it costs anything.

> >When I assembled my computer, more or less myself, I didn't even both
> >installing the floppy drive. If I wanted to move a file from one
> >computer to another, I'd just email it.

At 40K that takes too long.

--
Cheers,
Bev
************************************************** *******
Warning: Objects in mirror appear smarter than they are.

The Real Bev
July 14th 03, 09:26 PM
Gordon Reeder wrote:
>
> (myname) wrote:
>
> >"Bob Benjamin" > wrote:
> >
> >> Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is
> >> there anything else that I could use?
> >
> >People still use diskettes?
>
> I happen to have both 3.5" and 5.25" Floppy drives on my computer.
> But I don't get much milage out of them any more since I copied
> all the floppies (both sizes) onto CD-R.

Me too. I have both size floppies on my windows machine, but just a 3.5"
floppy on the linux machine. I have no idea what I'd need to get from a
5.25" floppy, but I know I'll find something as soon as I toss it. It's
not like it costs anything.

> >When I assembled my computer, more or less myself, I didn't even both
> >installing the floppy drive. If I wanted to move a file from one
> >computer to another, I'd just email it.

At 40K that takes too long.

--
Cheers,
Bev
************************************************** *******
Warning: Objects in mirror appear smarter than they are.

u2musicmike
July 15th 03, 12:16 AM
If you have an older machine that doesn't have a USB port or CD Rom,
you might do what I used to do and use a card board box. The size of
the box depends on how many diskettes you have. I used to keep all of
my disks in an old VCR sized box and had them all numbered and used a
shareware program call diskman to keep up with what was on them. I
have seen those plastic storage boxes in the trash and used one for
5.25 floppies to store CD's.

Mike

(Gordon Reeder) wrote in message >...
> (myname) wrote in
> >:
>
> >"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
> >...
> >> Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is
> >> there anything else that I could use?
> >
> >People still use diskettes?
>
> I happen to have both 3.5" and 5.25" Floppy drives on my computer.
> But I don't get much milage out of them any more since I copied
> all the floppies (both sizes) onto CD-R.
> >
> >When I assembled my computer, more or less myself, I didn't even both
> >installing the floppy drive. If I wanted to move a file from one
> >computer to another, I'd just email it.
> >

u2musicmike
July 15th 03, 12:16 AM
If you have an older machine that doesn't have a USB port or CD Rom,
you might do what I used to do and use a card board box. The size of
the box depends on how many diskettes you have. I used to keep all of
my disks in an old VCR sized box and had them all numbered and used a
shareware program call diskman to keep up with what was on them. I
have seen those plastic storage boxes in the trash and used one for
5.25 floppies to store CD's.

Mike

(Gordon Reeder) wrote in message >...
> (myname) wrote in
> >:
>
> >"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
> >...
> >> Instead of buying a specially designed container for diskettes is
> >> there anything else that I could use?
> >
> >People still use diskettes?
>
> I happen to have both 3.5" and 5.25" Floppy drives on my computer.
> But I don't get much milage out of them any more since I copied
> all the floppies (both sizes) onto CD-R.
> >
> >When I assembled my computer, more or less myself, I didn't even both
> >installing the floppy drive. If I wanted to move a file from one
> >computer to another, I'd just email it.
> >

Dennis
July 17th 03, 06:33 PM
On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 21:32:50 -0400, "lpogoda"
> wrote:

>As I said, some client companies have policies that forbid the electronic
>transmission of data as a security measure. I'm not claiming that it's
>reasonable or even consistent with their internal procedures (presumably the
>transmit backups electronically instead of loading tapes on a truck every
>night) but when it comes to us sending data to them, it has to be via disk
>as a matter of policy.

One of our customers is a government three-letter agency. We can send
them stuff electronically, but they can't send out any executable or
source code in machine readable form. Not in email, not on CD, not on
floppy disk, nothing. Once they built a test case that demonstrated a
problem they encountered. The only way they could send it was to make
a paper listing of the source and fax it to us! Fortunately, they are
a VERY bright bunch, they don't require much support and, when they
do, they are very pleasant to work with.

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

Dennis
July 17th 03, 06:33 PM
On Wed, 16 Jul 2003 21:32:50 -0400, "lpogoda"
> wrote:

>As I said, some client companies have policies that forbid the electronic
>transmission of data as a security measure. I'm not claiming that it's
>reasonable or even consistent with their internal procedures (presumably the
>transmit backups electronically instead of loading tapes on a truck every
>night) but when it comes to us sending data to them, it has to be via disk
>as a matter of policy.

One of our customers is a government three-letter agency. We can send
them stuff electronically, but they can't send out any executable or
source code in machine readable form. Not in email, not on CD, not on
floppy disk, nothing. Once they built a test case that demonstrated a
problem they encountered. The only way they could send it was to make
a paper listing of the source and fax it to us! Fortunately, they are
a VERY bright bunch, they don't require much support and, when they
do, they are very pleasant to work with.

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

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