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jitney
July 16th 03, 10:18 AM
Back when I used to shave, I used a straight razor, helps build
character. Now I have a full beard.-Jitney

Charles M
July 16th 03, 03:04 PM
In article >, Derald Martin wrote:
> Any USA readers of this NG use one?


Yes. What do you want to know?

Charles M
July 16th 03, 03:04 PM
In article >, Derald Martin wrote:
> Any USA readers of this NG use one?


Yes. What do you want to know?

Dennis
July 16th 03, 06:11 PM
On 16 Jul 2003 01:18:25 -0700, (jitney) wrote:

>Back when I used to shave, I used a straight razor, helps build
>character. Now I have a full beard.-Jitney

Covers up the scars, eh? :-)

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

Dennis
July 16th 03, 06:11 PM
On 16 Jul 2003 01:18:25 -0700, (jitney) wrote:

>Back when I used to shave, I used a straight razor, helps build
>character. Now I have a full beard.-Jitney

Covers up the scars, eh? :-)

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

July 17th 03, 04:11 AM
"Derald Martin" > wrote in message
...
> Charles M > wrote:
>
> >Yes. What do you want to know?
> If you use that dark green stopping compound (Chromium oxide) _and_
> if it is in the cutlers' paste and not the waxy sticks used by
> woodworkers, can you direct me to a retail source? My last purchase (a
> half-ounce "Puma" product from a cutler) was twenty-some years ago and
> now that I need more, I discover there no longer seem to be cutlers and
> the woodworkers' product is inadequate: It does not work down into the
> linen properly, yuck. FWIW, I have discovered the hard way that the
> product sold by barber/beauty supply houses is the same waxy stick
> intended for chisels, etc. I don't know why they even sell that stuff
> because it disables a linen strop and the pros use dispozos, anyway.
> Shame on me for not buying ahead, huh? ;-) Can you help?
> --
> TIA,
> Derald Martin


Yeah . . . um, you put the waxy stuff (there are different grades for
different types of leathers, I think) on the leather strop, not the linen
one. On the linen strop you rub bar soap (I use Ivory) into it, rub it in
with your fingers. The linen strop is supposed to heat up the tip of the
blade a bit, which makes it more pliable when you run it up and down the
leather strop. You can do the same thing just by heating it under hot
running water.
I mislaid my jar of stropping goop, I got it on the internet somewhere
(with Col. Conk stuff), but I've seen it in the Ft.Worth barber supply shop,
and in a couple knife shops in various malls (where they sell better strops
and straight razors and honing stones). There's a jar, I suspect, in a
mall with your name on it . . . and another one for me . . .
Hope this helps,
--Tock

ps--Yes, the other "pros" use disposable blades, but they usually use the
same blade all day long; use the same blade on 20 to 30 customers a day.
Not a wise thing to do . . . Most state barber boards require a new blade
for each customer (or a straight razor soaked with 99% isopropyl alcohol),
so when you go for your next haircut, before they do a neck shave, ask for a
shiny new blade. If they give you some rationalization instead, decline
the neck shave & report 'em to the barber board. Little bits of blood can
and do get on the blade, and just as you wouldn't use someone else's IV
needle, you don't want to be using someone else's razor blade.

July 17th 03, 04:11 AM
"Derald Martin" > wrote in message
...
> Charles M > wrote:
>
> >Yes. What do you want to know?
> If you use that dark green stopping compound (Chromium oxide) _and_
> if it is in the cutlers' paste and not the waxy sticks used by
> woodworkers, can you direct me to a retail source? My last purchase (a
> half-ounce "Puma" product from a cutler) was twenty-some years ago and
> now that I need more, I discover there no longer seem to be cutlers and
> the woodworkers' product is inadequate: It does not work down into the
> linen properly, yuck. FWIW, I have discovered the hard way that the
> product sold by barber/beauty supply houses is the same waxy stick
> intended for chisels, etc. I don't know why they even sell that stuff
> because it disables a linen strop and the pros use dispozos, anyway.
> Shame on me for not buying ahead, huh? ;-) Can you help?
> --
> TIA,
> Derald Martin


Yeah . . . um, you put the waxy stuff (there are different grades for
different types of leathers, I think) on the leather strop, not the linen
one. On the linen strop you rub bar soap (I use Ivory) into it, rub it in
with your fingers. The linen strop is supposed to heat up the tip of the
blade a bit, which makes it more pliable when you run it up and down the
leather strop. You can do the same thing just by heating it under hot
running water.
I mislaid my jar of stropping goop, I got it on the internet somewhere
(with Col. Conk stuff), but I've seen it in the Ft.Worth barber supply shop,
and in a couple knife shops in various malls (where they sell better strops
and straight razors and honing stones). There's a jar, I suspect, in a
mall with your name on it . . . and another one for me . . .
Hope this helps,
--Tock

ps--Yes, the other "pros" use disposable blades, but they usually use the
same blade all day long; use the same blade on 20 to 30 customers a day.
Not a wise thing to do . . . Most state barber boards require a new blade
for each customer (or a straight razor soaked with 99% isopropyl alcohol),
so when you go for your next haircut, before they do a neck shave, ask for a
shiny new blade. If they give you some rationalization instead, decline
the neck shave & report 'em to the barber board. Little bits of blood can
and do get on the blade, and just as you wouldn't use someone else's IV
needle, you don't want to be using someone else's razor blade.

Gary Heston
July 17th 03, 04:34 AM
In article >,
Derald Martin > wrote:
>Charles M > wrote:

>>Yes. What do you want to know?
> If you use that dark green stopping compound (Chromium oxide) _and_
>if it is in the cutlers' paste and not the waxy sticks used by
>woodworkers, can you direct me to a retail source? My last purchase (a
>half-ounce "Puma" product from a cutler) was twenty-some years ago and
>now that I need more, I discover there no longer seem to be cutlers and
>the woodworkers' product is inadequate: It does not work down into the
>linen properly, yuck. FWIW, I have discovered the hard way that the
>product sold by barber/beauty supply houses is the same waxy stick
>intended for chisels, etc. I don't know why they even sell that stuff
>because it disables a linen strop and the pros use dispozos, anyway.
>Shame on me for not buying ahead, huh? ;-) Can you help?

There's a sharpening method that starts with find sandpaper and ends
with very fine emery paper, on the order of 2000 grit. You might try
a piece of that, if you can find larger pieces to cut the right size
to attach to your strop.

Also, your stropping compound is probably similar to some of the
polishing compounds used in rock tumbling; you may need to get a
bit creative to come up with a binder to help it stick to your strop.
Neetsfoot oil or saddle soap might work well if you're using a leather
strop.


Gary

--
Gary Heston
PHB: "That's the sort of leadership that will turn this company around."
Wally: "Were we doing well?"
Dilbert, 5/23/3

Gary Heston
July 17th 03, 04:34 AM
In article >,
Derald Martin > wrote:
>Charles M > wrote:

>>Yes. What do you want to know?
> If you use that dark green stopping compound (Chromium oxide) _and_
>if it is in the cutlers' paste and not the waxy sticks used by
>woodworkers, can you direct me to a retail source? My last purchase (a
>half-ounce "Puma" product from a cutler) was twenty-some years ago and
>now that I need more, I discover there no longer seem to be cutlers and
>the woodworkers' product is inadequate: It does not work down into the
>linen properly, yuck. FWIW, I have discovered the hard way that the
>product sold by barber/beauty supply houses is the same waxy stick
>intended for chisels, etc. I don't know why they even sell that stuff
>because it disables a linen strop and the pros use dispozos, anyway.
>Shame on me for not buying ahead, huh? ;-) Can you help?

There's a sharpening method that starts with find sandpaper and ends
with very fine emery paper, on the order of 2000 grit. You might try
a piece of that, if you can find larger pieces to cut the right size
to attach to your strop.

Also, your stropping compound is probably similar to some of the
polishing compounds used in rock tumbling; you may need to get a
bit creative to come up with a binder to help it stick to your strop.
Neetsfoot oil or saddle soap might work well if you're using a leather
strop.


Gary

--
Gary Heston
PHB: "That's the sort of leadership that will turn this company around."
Wally: "Were we doing well?"
Dilbert, 5/23/3

Bob
July 17th 03, 05:07 PM
"Gary Heston" > wrote in message
...

> There's a sharpening method that starts with find sandpaper and ends
> with very fine emery paper, on the order of 2000 grit. You might try
> a piece of that, if you can find larger pieces to cut the right size
> to attach to your strop.

Search for "scary sharp" sharpening method.

Bob

Bob
July 17th 03, 05:07 PM
"Gary Heston" > wrote in message
...

> There's a sharpening method that starts with find sandpaper and ends
> with very fine emery paper, on the order of 2000 grit. You might try
> a piece of that, if you can find larger pieces to cut the right size
> to attach to your strop.

Search for "scary sharp" sharpening method.

Bob

Neil
July 17th 03, 06:28 PM
> wrote in message >...
> "Derald Martin" > wrote in message
> ...

I remember reading about this in the Whole Earth Catalog 30+ years
ago, from which I remember one tip:

Ask at old barber shops. Some shops will have old straight razors
they're glad to get rid of.

(I don't use straight razors myself. Scared to!)

> > Any USA readers of this NG use one?
> > --
> > TIA,
> > Derald
>
>
> Yep, in my job as a barber.
> --Tock

Neil
July 17th 03, 06:28 PM
> wrote in message >...
> "Derald Martin" > wrote in message
> ...

I remember reading about this in the Whole Earth Catalog 30+ years
ago, from which I remember one tip:

Ask at old barber shops. Some shops will have old straight razors
they're glad to get rid of.

(I don't use straight razors myself. Scared to!)

> > Any USA readers of this NG use one?
> > --
> > TIA,
> > Derald
>
>
> Yep, in my job as a barber.
> --Tock

July 17th 03, 08:32 PM
> There's a sharpening method that starts with find sandpaper and ends
> with very fine emery paper, on the order of 2000 grit. You might try
> a piece of that, if you can find larger pieces to cut the right size
> to attach to your strop.


If you have a hollow ground (concave-shaped) blade you'll definitely want to
use a hone instead of sandpaper to sharpen 'em. The reason being, the
angle of the point needs to stay the same to get the optimum cutting
ability, and if you run just the tip of the blade over sandpaper, that ain't
gonna happen. Instead, you need to lay the blade flat on an abrasive
surface (hones are good for this) and stroke it with reasonably light
pressure. Don't stroke it back and forth, stroke it only in the direction
of the blade. This way, a small bit of metal will be removed from the tip
as well as the thicker side of the razor, and the geometry of the blade will
remain constant . . . as the tip wears shorter, the side will wear thinner,
the angles will remain constant, and the angels in heaven will strum their
harps of gold . . .
To tell you the truth, though, I've found that the Personna disposable
blades used for straight-razor shaving work better than the stroppable
razors. Basically, they're just sharper. There's another brand of
disposable blades--it escapes my memory right now--but they aren't nearly as
sharp . . . they're ok for hair cuts, but that's about it. Ya, if you're
not really into stropping but still want a good straight razor, get one that
uses disposable Personna blades. Pretty good stuff. I can get 5 good
shaves with one blade . . . you can get the blades cheap at
www.beautycentury.com , or at least as cheap as I've seen 'em.
Hope this helps . . .
--Tock

July 17th 03, 08:32 PM
> There's a sharpening method that starts with find sandpaper and ends
> with very fine emery paper, on the order of 2000 grit. You might try
> a piece of that, if you can find larger pieces to cut the right size
> to attach to your strop.


If you have a hollow ground (concave-shaped) blade you'll definitely want to
use a hone instead of sandpaper to sharpen 'em. The reason being, the
angle of the point needs to stay the same to get the optimum cutting
ability, and if you run just the tip of the blade over sandpaper, that ain't
gonna happen. Instead, you need to lay the blade flat on an abrasive
surface (hones are good for this) and stroke it with reasonably light
pressure. Don't stroke it back and forth, stroke it only in the direction
of the blade. This way, a small bit of metal will be removed from the tip
as well as the thicker side of the razor, and the geometry of the blade will
remain constant . . . as the tip wears shorter, the side will wear thinner,
the angles will remain constant, and the angels in heaven will strum their
harps of gold . . .
To tell you the truth, though, I've found that the Personna disposable
blades used for straight-razor shaving work better than the stroppable
razors. Basically, they're just sharper. There's another brand of
disposable blades--it escapes my memory right now--but they aren't nearly as
sharp . . . they're ok for hair cuts, but that's about it. Ya, if you're
not really into stropping but still want a good straight razor, get one that
uses disposable Personna blades. Pretty good stuff. I can get 5 good
shaves with one blade . . . you can get the blades cheap at
www.beautycentury.com , or at least as cheap as I've seen 'em.
Hope this helps . . .
--Tock

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