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me
July 17th 03, 06:21 AM
Ok, I'm not really a slob, but sometimes it seems I'm too frugal for my
own good. So here I am cleaning out the fridge and finding all kinds of
stuff that may or may NOT still be good..everything from mayonnaise and
mustard in little squeeze pouches from take out long since gone to
tartar sauce in the cubby hole to peanut butter that just MIGHT be older
than our fridge.

So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out? How can you
really tell when something's ready to be dumped and what stuff is merely
not as "fresh" as it once was? How long after the freshness date stamp
on milk expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and cooking?
Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?

And while I'm asking, I must have forgotten all about them. Found a
bowl of green beans in the microwave from yesterday. Would they have
gone bad yet? What kind of life do they have before you just need to
dump them?

Thanks to all who can advise.

---the apparent slob

drifter
July 17th 03, 07:56 AM
It depends on what it is. Colour, odour, taste, appearance all help in
the decision. If in doubt, though it out. Your health, stomach is
worth more than that. Mustard keeps for ever. Bread freezes well. It
stays fresher out of the fridge but then goes moldy if left too long. I
usually keep home made bread wrapped for a couple of days then freeze
the bread sliced. It makes excellent toast and you can use it for
french toast. Some people just scrape off the mold and others, like
myself, prefer to toss. Your call really, your medical bills.

me wrote:
>
> Ok, I'm not really a slob, but sometimes it seems I'm too frugal for my
> own good. So here I am cleaning out the fridge and finding all kinds of
> stuff that may or may NOT still be good..everything from mayonnaise and
> mustard in little squeeze pouches from take out long since gone to
> tartar sauce in the cubby hole to peanut butter that just MIGHT be older
> than our fridge.
>
> So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out? How can you
> really tell when something's ready to be dumped and what stuff is merely
> not as "fresh" as it once was? How long after the freshness date stamp
> on milk expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and cooking?
> Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?
>
> And while I'm asking, I must have forgotten all about them. Found a
> bowl of green beans in the microwave from yesterday. Would they have
> gone bad yet? What kind of life do they have before you just need to
> dump them?
>
> Thanks to all who can advise.
>
> ---the apparent slob

drifter
July 17th 03, 07:56 AM
It depends on what it is. Colour, odour, taste, appearance all help in
the decision. If in doubt, though it out. Your health, stomach is
worth more than that. Mustard keeps for ever. Bread freezes well. It
stays fresher out of the fridge but then goes moldy if left too long. I
usually keep home made bread wrapped for a couple of days then freeze
the bread sliced. It makes excellent toast and you can use it for
french toast. Some people just scrape off the mold and others, like
myself, prefer to toss. Your call really, your medical bills.

me wrote:
>
> Ok, I'm not really a slob, but sometimes it seems I'm too frugal for my
> own good. So here I am cleaning out the fridge and finding all kinds of
> stuff that may or may NOT still be good..everything from mayonnaise and
> mustard in little squeeze pouches from take out long since gone to
> tartar sauce in the cubby hole to peanut butter that just MIGHT be older
> than our fridge.
>
> So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out? How can you
> really tell when something's ready to be dumped and what stuff is merely
> not as "fresh" as it once was? How long after the freshness date stamp
> on milk expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and cooking?
> Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?
>
> And while I'm asking, I must have forgotten all about them. Found a
> bowl of green beans in the microwave from yesterday. Would they have
> gone bad yet? What kind of life do they have before you just need to
> dump them?
>
> Thanks to all who can advise.
>
> ---the apparent slob

Elana
July 17th 03, 08:21 AM
me > wrote:

> Ok, I'm not really a slob, but sometimes it seems I'm too frugal for my
> own good. So here I am cleaning out the fridge and finding all kinds of
> stuff that may or may NOT still be good..everything from mayonnaise and
> mustard in little squeeze pouches from take out long since gone to
> tartar sauce in the cubby hole to peanut butter that just MIGHT be older
> than our fridge.

Never understood keeping peanut butter in the fridge. Must be a pain to
spread.

> So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out?

The pouches should be fine.

> How can you
> really tell when something's ready to be dumped and what stuff is merely
> not as "fresh" as it once was?

To put it simply...which costs less? A trip to the emergency room from
getting sick, or a new jar of whatever? If in doubt, throw it out (man,
Johnnie Cochran would love me...)

> How long after the freshness date stamp
> on milk expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and cooking?

Each bottle is different. Smell it. If it doesn't smell to your
liking, toss it.

> Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?

Bread does better in the freezer, and then just defrost in micro or
toaster what you need. Lasts longest in there. Make sure it's well
wrapped.

> And while I'm asking, I must have forgotten all about them. Found a
> bowl of green beans in the microwave from yesterday. Would they have
> gone bad yet? What kind of life do they have before you just need to
> dump them?

I always do this...I toss.

E

Elana
July 17th 03, 08:21 AM
me > wrote:

> Ok, I'm not really a slob, but sometimes it seems I'm too frugal for my
> own good. So here I am cleaning out the fridge and finding all kinds of
> stuff that may or may NOT still be good..everything from mayonnaise and
> mustard in little squeeze pouches from take out long since gone to
> tartar sauce in the cubby hole to peanut butter that just MIGHT be older
> than our fridge.

Never understood keeping peanut butter in the fridge. Must be a pain to
spread.

> So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out?

The pouches should be fine.

> How can you
> really tell when something's ready to be dumped and what stuff is merely
> not as "fresh" as it once was?

To put it simply...which costs less? A trip to the emergency room from
getting sick, or a new jar of whatever? If in doubt, throw it out (man,
Johnnie Cochran would love me...)

> How long after the freshness date stamp
> on milk expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and cooking?

Each bottle is different. Smell it. If it doesn't smell to your
liking, toss it.

> Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?

Bread does better in the freezer, and then just defrost in micro or
toaster what you need. Lasts longest in there. Make sure it's well
wrapped.

> And while I'm asking, I must have forgotten all about them. Found a
> bowl of green beans in the microwave from yesterday. Would they have
> gone bad yet? What kind of life do they have before you just need to
> dump them?

I always do this...I toss.

E

Pete Romfh
July 17th 03, 01:02 PM
me wrote:
> Ok, I'm not really a slob, but sometimes it seems I'm too
> frugal for my own good. So here I am cleaning out the
> fridge and finding all kinds of stuff that may or may NOT
> still be good..everything from mayonnaise and mustard in
> little squeeze pouches from take out long since gone to
> tartar sauce in the cubby hole to peanut butter that just
> MIGHT be older than our fridge.
>
> So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out?
> How can you really tell when something's ready to be
> dumped and what stuff is merely not as "fresh" as it once
> was? How long after the freshness date stamp on milk
> expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and
> cooking? Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or
> out?
>
> And while I'm asking, I must have forgotten all about
> them. Found a bowl of green beans in the microwave from
> yesterday. Would they have gone bad yet? What kind of
> life do they have before you just need to dump them?
>
> Thanks to all who can advise.
>
> ---the apparent slob

As a wanna-be chef I've studied food sanitation and food economics.
You might approach the decision process as an economic decision.

Figure the replacement cost of the food you're throwing out. Allow for the
cost of driving to the store and something for your time as well. It might
look something like this:

Food replacement cost ... $20
Transportation etc. $5
2 hours time @ $15/hr $30
So potential food value is about $55 (Best case)

Now think of the potential cost if one item is truely bad:

Co-pay for ER visit $40
2 days off work $200 (or the impact of using personal
absence days)
2 hrs cleaning up where you barfed and missed @ $15/hr $30

Hopefully you didn't serve that potato salad to some guests or the equation
becomes:

Defense atty. fees $10,000
Court filings $500
Damage awards (they hired Johnny (When in Doubt, Throw it out) Cochran. $
unimaginable
Damage to your reputation as a host $ ????

Food, especially prepared food, needs to be kept: Clean, Cold, Covered, and
not too long.

Food should be below 40 or above 140 degrees(F) as quickly as possible.

For an entertaining look at these topics take a look at:
http://starchefs.com/about_us/html/games.shtml

More fun that sitting in a boring (and expensive) class in C school.

--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at Texas dot net

Pete Romfh
July 17th 03, 01:02 PM
me wrote:
> Ok, I'm not really a slob, but sometimes it seems I'm too
> frugal for my own good. So here I am cleaning out the
> fridge and finding all kinds of stuff that may or may NOT
> still be good..everything from mayonnaise and mustard in
> little squeeze pouches from take out long since gone to
> tartar sauce in the cubby hole to peanut butter that just
> MIGHT be older than our fridge.
>
> So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out?
> How can you really tell when something's ready to be
> dumped and what stuff is merely not as "fresh" as it once
> was? How long after the freshness date stamp on milk
> expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and
> cooking? Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or
> out?
>
> And while I'm asking, I must have forgotten all about
> them. Found a bowl of green beans in the microwave from
> yesterday. Would they have gone bad yet? What kind of
> life do they have before you just need to dump them?
>
> Thanks to all who can advise.
>
> ---the apparent slob

As a wanna-be chef I've studied food sanitation and food economics.
You might approach the decision process as an economic decision.

Figure the replacement cost of the food you're throwing out. Allow for the
cost of driving to the store and something for your time as well. It might
look something like this:

Food replacement cost ... $20
Transportation etc. $5
2 hours time @ $15/hr $30
So potential food value is about $55 (Best case)

Now think of the potential cost if one item is truely bad:

Co-pay for ER visit $40
2 days off work $200 (or the impact of using personal
absence days)
2 hrs cleaning up where you barfed and missed @ $15/hr $30

Hopefully you didn't serve that potato salad to some guests or the equation
becomes:

Defense atty. fees $10,000
Court filings $500
Damage awards (they hired Johnny (When in Doubt, Throw it out) Cochran. $
unimaginable
Damage to your reputation as a host $ ????

Food, especially prepared food, needs to be kept: Clean, Cold, Covered, and
not too long.

Food should be below 40 or above 140 degrees(F) as quickly as possible.

For an entertaining look at these topics take a look at:
http://starchefs.com/about_us/html/games.shtml

More fun that sitting in a boring (and expensive) class in C school.

--
Pete Romfh, Telecom Geek & Amateur Gourmet.
promfh at Texas dot net

Don K
July 17th 03, 01:38 PM
"Elana" > wrote in message
...
> me > wrote:
> > Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?
>
> Bread does better in the freezer, and then just defrost in micro or
> toaster what you need. Lasts longest in there. Make sure it's well
> wrapped.

I agree. But if you're making sandwiches in the morning to take for
lunch, don't bother to defrost. They will defrost themselves and will
tend to keep your lunch cool for a while.

If I don't anticipate using up bread within 2 or 3 days, I will
freeze it. Frozen bread still tastes fresh for a week or two,
long after unfrozen bread goes noticeably stale. After a
couple of month, frozen bread develops a "frozen bread"
taste, but is probably still edible. It probably loses some
texture and nutrients along the way.

> > And while I'm asking, I must have forgotten all about them. Found a
> > bowl of green beans in the microwave from yesterday. Would they have
> > gone bad yet? What kind of life do they have before you just need to
> > dump them?
>
> I always do this...I toss.

String beans are pretty stable. If you didn't add anything else to them
that spoils easily, I think you could safely eat them at your next meal.

Don

Don K
July 17th 03, 01:38 PM
"Elana" > wrote in message
...
> me > wrote:
> > Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?
>
> Bread does better in the freezer, and then just defrost in micro or
> toaster what you need. Lasts longest in there. Make sure it's well
> wrapped.

I agree. But if you're making sandwiches in the morning to take for
lunch, don't bother to defrost. They will defrost themselves and will
tend to keep your lunch cool for a while.

If I don't anticipate using up bread within 2 or 3 days, I will
freeze it. Frozen bread still tastes fresh for a week or two,
long after unfrozen bread goes noticeably stale. After a
couple of month, frozen bread develops a "frozen bread"
taste, but is probably still edible. It probably loses some
texture and nutrients along the way.

> > And while I'm asking, I must have forgotten all about them. Found a
> > bowl of green beans in the microwave from yesterday. Would they have
> > gone bad yet? What kind of life do they have before you just need to
> > dump them?
>
> I always do this...I toss.

String beans are pretty stable. If you didn't add anything else to them
that spoils easily, I think you could safely eat them at your next meal.

Don

Cheryl Perkins
July 17th 03, 03:14 PM
Pat Meadows > wrote:

> I keep it in the fridge, Elana, and yes, it's a pain to
> spread. But I eat 'natural' peanut butter - ingredients:
> peanuts.

> I've always assumed it would go bad left on the shelf, and
> perhaps mold. Peanuts are subject to the very-dangerous
> aflatoxin molds.

It never occured to me that peanut butter would go bad sitting on the
counter, and I usually buy a 'just peanuts' brand, too. Of course, I don't
live in a very hot climate.

I accidentally picked up a standard brand last time I was shopping, and it
is noticeably sweeter, which is to be expected considering there's sugar
added. It was nice not to have to stir the separated oil back in, though.
I find that storing the bottle upside down seems to help with that.

Cheryl

Cheryl Perkins
July 17th 03, 03:14 PM
Pat Meadows > wrote:

> I keep it in the fridge, Elana, and yes, it's a pain to
> spread. But I eat 'natural' peanut butter - ingredients:
> peanuts.

> I've always assumed it would go bad left on the shelf, and
> perhaps mold. Peanuts are subject to the very-dangerous
> aflatoxin molds.

It never occured to me that peanut butter would go bad sitting on the
counter, and I usually buy a 'just peanuts' brand, too. Of course, I don't
live in a very hot climate.

I accidentally picked up a standard brand last time I was shopping, and it
is noticeably sweeter, which is to be expected considering there's sugar
added. It was nice not to have to stir the separated oil back in, though.
I find that storing the bottle upside down seems to help with that.

Cheryl

Elana
July 17th 03, 04:40 PM
Pat Meadows > wrote:

> On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 13:14:24 +0000 (UTC), Cheryl Perkins
> > wrote:
>
>
> >It never occured to me that peanut butter would go bad sitting on the
> >counter, and I usually buy a 'just peanuts' brand, too. Of course, I don't
> >live in a very hot climate.
>
> Bit of Canadian understatement, there, eh? <g>

Hehehe...

I do have a jar of SoyButter at my parents place...can't wait to see
what it's like when we go back...

> >I accidentally picked up a standard brand last time I was shopping, and it
> >is noticeably sweeter, which is to be expected considering there's sugar
> >added. It was nice not to have to stir the separated oil back in, though.
> >I find that storing the bottle upside down seems to help with that.
> >
>
> I store it upside down also.

Why? Cause the oil isn't dealt with at all then?

E

Elana
July 17th 03, 04:40 PM
Pat Meadows > wrote:

> On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 13:14:24 +0000 (UTC), Cheryl Perkins
> > wrote:
>
>
> >It never occured to me that peanut butter would go bad sitting on the
> >counter, and I usually buy a 'just peanuts' brand, too. Of course, I don't
> >live in a very hot climate.
>
> Bit of Canadian understatement, there, eh? <g>

Hehehe...

I do have a jar of SoyButter at my parents place...can't wait to see
what it's like when we go back...

> >I accidentally picked up a standard brand last time I was shopping, and it
> >is noticeably sweeter, which is to be expected considering there's sugar
> >added. It was nice not to have to stir the separated oil back in, though.
> >I find that storing the bottle upside down seems to help with that.
> >
>
> I store it upside down also.

Why? Cause the oil isn't dealt with at all then?

E

Elana
July 17th 03, 06:17 PM
Pat Meadows > wrote:

> If you leave it upside down, it's easier to stir it back in
> because you won't go spilling it all over the place when you
> stir it.

Thanks :-).

E

Elana
July 17th 03, 06:17 PM
Pat Meadows > wrote:

> If you leave it upside down, it's easier to stir it back in
> because you won't go spilling it all over the place when you
> stir it.

Thanks :-).

E

July 17th 03, 07:54 PM
"me" > wrote in message
...
> Ok, I'm not really a slob, but sometimes it seems I'm too frugal for my
> own good. So here I am cleaning out the fridge and finding all kinds of
> stuff that may or may NOT still be good..everything from mayonnaise and
> mustard in little squeeze pouches from take out long since gone to
> tartar sauce in the cubby hole to peanut butter that just MIGHT be older
> than our fridge.
>
> So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out? How can you
> really tell when something's ready to be dumped and what stuff is merely
> not as "fresh" as it once was? How long after the freshness date stamp
> on milk expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and cooking?
> Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?
>
> And while I'm asking, I must have forgotten all about them. Found a
> bowl of green beans in the microwave from yesterday. Would they have
> gone bad yet? What kind of life do they have before you just need to
> dump them?
>
> Thanks to all who can advise.
>
> ---the apparent slob
>


When in doubt, throw it out. Cheaper than a visit to the doctor. Just
resolve to monitor what's in the fridge a little closer and devour what you
can in a reasonable time.
Stuff in little squeeze pouches should be good for a long long time, but
anything that's been opened (exposed to airborne germs) will go bad sooner
or later. Milk, well, you can give it the sniff test (if your olfactory
senses are acute), but pretty much I'd toss it a day or two after the
expiration date, maybe three or four if it's nonfat skim milk. Bread lasts
appreciably longer in the fridge, by a week or two; the coolness slows down
the reproduction rate of those unfriendly bacteria. Affects its texture
somewhat, but it's still pretty good.

July 17th 03, 07:54 PM
"me" > wrote in message
...
> Ok, I'm not really a slob, but sometimes it seems I'm too frugal for my
> own good. So here I am cleaning out the fridge and finding all kinds of
> stuff that may or may NOT still be good..everything from mayonnaise and
> mustard in little squeeze pouches from take out long since gone to
> tartar sauce in the cubby hole to peanut butter that just MIGHT be older
> than our fridge.
>
> So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out? How can you
> really tell when something's ready to be dumped and what stuff is merely
> not as "fresh" as it once was? How long after the freshness date stamp
> on milk expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and cooking?
> Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?
>
> And while I'm asking, I must have forgotten all about them. Found a
> bowl of green beans in the microwave from yesterday. Would they have
> gone bad yet? What kind of life do they have before you just need to
> dump them?
>
> Thanks to all who can advise.
>
> ---the apparent slob
>


When in doubt, throw it out. Cheaper than a visit to the doctor. Just
resolve to monitor what's in the fridge a little closer and devour what you
can in a reasonable time.
Stuff in little squeeze pouches should be good for a long long time, but
anything that's been opened (exposed to airborne germs) will go bad sooner
or later. Milk, well, you can give it the sniff test (if your olfactory
senses are acute), but pretty much I'd toss it a day or two after the
expiration date, maybe three or four if it's nonfat skim milk. Bread lasts
appreciably longer in the fridge, by a week or two; the coolness slows down
the reproduction rate of those unfriendly bacteria. Affects its texture
somewhat, but it's still pretty good.

July 17th 03, 08:00 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 15:40:56 +0100,
> (Elana) wrote:
>
>
> >>
> >> I store it upside down also.
> >
> >Why? Cause the oil isn't dealt with at all then?
> >
>
> The oil in natural peanut butter rises to the top and is
> very difficult to stir back into the peanut butter.
>
> If you leave it upside down, it's easier to stir it back in
> because you won't go spilling it all over the place when you
> stir it.
>
> Or you can leave it and never eat it, but then the peanut
> butter gets really hard to spread, if not impossible to
> spread.
>
> Pat

I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to be
polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit stuff,
seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put an
unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms for
a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I chance
across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .
--Tock

July 17th 03, 08:00 PM
"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 15:40:56 +0100,
> (Elana) wrote:
>
>
> >>
> >> I store it upside down also.
> >
> >Why? Cause the oil isn't dealt with at all then?
> >
>
> The oil in natural peanut butter rises to the top and is
> very difficult to stir back into the peanut butter.
>
> If you leave it upside down, it's easier to stir it back in
> because you won't go spilling it all over the place when you
> stir it.
>
> Or you can leave it and never eat it, but then the peanut
> butter gets really hard to spread, if not impossible to
> spread.
>
> Pat

I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to be
polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit stuff,
seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put an
unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms for
a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I chance
across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .
--Tock

Elana
July 17th 03, 08:37 PM
> wrote:

> I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to be
> polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit stuff,
> seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
> front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put an
> unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms for
> a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I chance
> across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .

Rock tumbler.

E
daughter of a geologist

Elana
July 17th 03, 08:37 PM
> wrote:

> I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to be
> polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit stuff,
> seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
> front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put an
> unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms for
> a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I chance
> across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .

Rock tumbler.

E
daughter of a geologist

The Real Bev
July 17th 03, 10:55 PM
wrote:
>
> "Pat Meadows" > wrote:
> >
> > (Elana) wrote:
> >
> > >> I store it upside down also.
> > >
> > >Why? Cause the oil isn't dealt with at all then?
> >
> > The oil in natural peanut butter rises to the top and is
> > very difficult to stir back into the peanut butter.
> >
> > If you leave it upside down, it's easier to stir it back in
> > because you won't go spilling it all over the place when you
> > stir it.
> >
> > Or you can leave it and never eat it, but then the peanut
> > butter gets really hard to spread, if not impossible to
> > spread.
>
> I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to be
> polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit stuff,
> seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
> front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put an
> unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms for
> a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I chance
> across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .

Seems like overkill. I'd be willing to bet that it wouldn't work --
oil-less PB is almost as stiff as modeling clay.

Trader Joe's real peanut butter must have a lot of turnover -- I've never
bought a jar of it with enough oil separation to worry about. And I don't
think I've ever had a jar of peanut butter of any sort last more than a
few days, either. Am I the only one who eats it straight from the jar
with a tablespoon?

--
Cheers,
Bev
*----------------------------------------------------*
*Are you *sure* there's a hyphen in "anal-retentive?"*

The Real Bev
July 17th 03, 10:55 PM
wrote:
>
> "Pat Meadows" > wrote:
> >
> > (Elana) wrote:
> >
> > >> I store it upside down also.
> > >
> > >Why? Cause the oil isn't dealt with at all then?
> >
> > The oil in natural peanut butter rises to the top and is
> > very difficult to stir back into the peanut butter.
> >
> > If you leave it upside down, it's easier to stir it back in
> > because you won't go spilling it all over the place when you
> > stir it.
> >
> > Or you can leave it and never eat it, but then the peanut
> > butter gets really hard to spread, if not impossible to
> > spread.
>
> I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to be
> polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit stuff,
> seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
> front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put an
> unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms for
> a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I chance
> across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .

Seems like overkill. I'd be willing to bet that it wouldn't work --
oil-less PB is almost as stiff as modeling clay.

Trader Joe's real peanut butter must have a lot of turnover -- I've never
bought a jar of it with enough oil separation to worry about. And I don't
think I've ever had a jar of peanut butter of any sort last more than a
few days, either. Am I the only one who eats it straight from the jar
with a tablespoon?

--
Cheers,
Bev
*----------------------------------------------------*
*Are you *sure* there's a hyphen in "anal-retentive?"*

jean and bill
July 18th 03, 12:44 AM
In article >,
says...
> I've always assumed it would go bad left on the shelf, and
> perhaps mold. Peanuts are subject to the very-dangerous
> aflatoxin molds.
>
>
I buy natural PB, too, and never refrigerate it. Of course, we go
through a jar a week around here, don't know how long it would last
otherwise.

Jeannie
--
To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

jean and bill
July 18th 03, 12:44 AM
In article >,
says...
> I've always assumed it would go bad left on the shelf, and
> perhaps mold. Peanuts are subject to the very-dangerous
> aflatoxin molds.
>
>
I buy natural PB, too, and never refrigerate it. Of course, we go
through a jar a week around here, don't know how long it would last
otherwise.

Jeannie
--
To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

JonquilJan
July 18th 03, 12:55 AM
The Real Bev > wrote in message
...
> wrote:
> >
> > "Pat Meadows" > wrote:
> > >
> > > (Elana) wrote:
> > >
> > > >> I store it upside down also.
> > > >
> > > >Why? Cause the oil isn't dealt with at all then?
> > >
> > > The oil in natural peanut butter rises to the top and is
> > > very difficult to stir back into the peanut butter.
> > >
> > > If you leave it upside down, it's easier to stir it back in
> > > because you won't go spilling it all over the place when you
> > > stir it.
> > >
> > > Or you can leave it and never eat it, but then the peanut
> > > butter gets really hard to spread, if not impossible to
> > > spread.
> >
> > I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to
be
> > polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit
stuff,
> > seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
> > front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put
an
> > unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms
for
> > a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I
chance
> > across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .
>
> Seems like overkill. I'd be willing to bet that it wouldn't work --
> oil-less PB is almost as stiff as modeling clay.
>
> Trader Joe's real peanut butter must have a lot of turnover -- I've never
> bought a jar of it with enough oil separation to worry about. And I don't
> think I've ever had a jar of peanut butter of any sort last more than a
> few days, either. Am I the only one who eats it straight from the jar
> with a tablespoon?

No you're not the only one. I hide pills in it for my dog - she loves PB.

JonquilJan

>
> --
> Cheers,
> Bev
> *----------------------------------------------------*
> *Are you *sure* there's a hyphen in "anal-retentive?"*

JonquilJan
July 18th 03, 12:55 AM
The Real Bev > wrote in message
...
> wrote:
> >
> > "Pat Meadows" > wrote:
> > >
> > > (Elana) wrote:
> > >
> > > >> I store it upside down also.
> > > >
> > > >Why? Cause the oil isn't dealt with at all then?
> > >
> > > The oil in natural peanut butter rises to the top and is
> > > very difficult to stir back into the peanut butter.
> > >
> > > If you leave it upside down, it's easier to stir it back in
> > > because you won't go spilling it all over the place when you
> > > stir it.
> > >
> > > Or you can leave it and never eat it, but then the peanut
> > > butter gets really hard to spread, if not impossible to
> > > spread.
> >
> > I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to
be
> > polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit
stuff,
> > seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
> > front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put
an
> > unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms
for
> > a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I
chance
> > across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .
>
> Seems like overkill. I'd be willing to bet that it wouldn't work --
> oil-less PB is almost as stiff as modeling clay.
>
> Trader Joe's real peanut butter must have a lot of turnover -- I've never
> bought a jar of it with enough oil separation to worry about. And I don't
> think I've ever had a jar of peanut butter of any sort last more than a
> few days, either. Am I the only one who eats it straight from the jar
> with a tablespoon?

No you're not the only one. I hide pills in it for my dog - she loves PB.

JonquilJan

>
> --
> Cheers,
> Bev
> *----------------------------------------------------*
> *Are you *sure* there's a hyphen in "anal-retentive?"*

lpogoda
July 18th 03, 03:12 AM
wrote in message
>...
>
>"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
>> On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 15:40:56 +0100,
>> (Elana) wrote:
>>
>>
>> >>
>> >> I store it upside down also.
>> >
>> >Why? Cause the oil isn't dealt with at all then?
>> >
>>
>> The oil in natural peanut butter rises to the top and is
>> very difficult to stir back into the peanut butter.
>>
>> If you leave it upside down, it's easier to stir it back in
>> because you won't go spilling it all over the place when you
>> stir it.
>>
>> Or you can leave it and never eat it, but then the peanut
>> butter gets really hard to spread, if not impossible to
>> spread.
>>
>> Pat
>
>I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to be
>polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit stuff,
>seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
>front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put an
>unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms for
>a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I chance
>across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .


Alternatively, you could take it down to the hardware store and ask to use
the gizmo they use to shake cans of paint to mix them up. But consider -
would you just drink down an equivalent quantity of cooking oil?

lpogoda
July 18th 03, 03:12 AM
wrote in message
>...
>
>"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
>> On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 15:40:56 +0100,
>> (Elana) wrote:
>>
>>
>> >>
>> >> I store it upside down also.
>> >
>> >Why? Cause the oil isn't dealt with at all then?
>> >
>>
>> The oil in natural peanut butter rises to the top and is
>> very difficult to stir back into the peanut butter.
>>
>> If you leave it upside down, it's easier to stir it back in
>> because you won't go spilling it all over the place when you
>> stir it.
>>
>> Or you can leave it and never eat it, but then the peanut
>> butter gets really hard to spread, if not impossible to
>> spread.
>>
>> Pat
>
>I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to be
>polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit stuff,
>seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
>front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put an
>unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms for
>a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I chance
>across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .


Alternatively, you could take it down to the hardware store and ask to use
the gizmo they use to shake cans of paint to mix them up. But consider -
would you just drink down an equivalent quantity of cooking oil?

Michael Black
July 18th 03, 03:20 AM
Elana ) writes:
> > wrote:
>
>> I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to be
>> polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit stuff,
>> seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
>> front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put an
>> unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms for
>> a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I chance
>> across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .
>
> Rock tumbler.
>
> E
> daughter of a geologist

No, I think in this case he's got it all wrong, and he'd be wanting
a paint spinner (is that the name?) like they have at the hardware store
that shakes up a a can of paint.

It would have to be an industrial strength rock tumbler to deal with
a jar of peanut butter (and better hope the jar is plastic).

And if I had a rock tumbler, it's intended use would be far more
interesting than using it to mix up peanut butter.

Michael

Michael Black
July 18th 03, 03:20 AM
Elana ) writes:
> > wrote:
>
>> I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to be
>> polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit stuff,
>> seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way a
>> front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could put an
>> unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms for
>> a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I chance
>> across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .
>
> Rock tumbler.
>
> E
> daughter of a geologist

No, I think in this case he's got it all wrong, and he'd be wanting
a paint spinner (is that the name?) like they have at the hardware store
that shakes up a a can of paint.

It would have to be an industrial strength rock tumbler to deal with
a jar of peanut butter (and better hope the jar is plastic).

And if I had a rock tumbler, it's intended use would be far more
interesting than using it to mix up peanut butter.

Michael

July 18th 03, 04:17 AM
"Michael Black" > wrote in message
...
> Elana ) writes:
> > > wrote:
> >
> >> I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to
be
> >> polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit
stuff,
> >> seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way
a
> >> front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could
put an
> >> unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms
for
> >> a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I
chance
> >> across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .
> >
> > Rock tumbler.
> >
> > E
> > daughter of a geologist
>
> No, I think in this case he's got it all wrong, and he'd be wanting
> a paint spinner (is that the name?) like they have at the hardware store
> that shakes up a a can of paint.
>
> It would have to be an industrial strength rock tumbler to deal with
> a jar of peanut butter (and better hope the jar is plastic).
>
> And if I had a rock tumbler, it's intended use would be far more
> interesting than using it to mix up peanut butter.
>
> Michael



Yep, a rock tumbler is what I had in mind . . . like the ones at
www.bergsrockshop.com/cgi-bin/product.php?item=Rock%20Tumblers
Put a jar of the good oil-separated PB in one of those drums, or just put
the jar on the turning mechanism, and let it do its work . . . geez, all
this talk of PB has me hungry now . . . and I'm out of bread . . . ugh . . .
--Tock

July 18th 03, 04:17 AM
"Michael Black" > wrote in message
...
> Elana ) writes:
> > > wrote:
> >
> >> I've seen a gizmo used for polishing stones where you put the stones to
be
> >> polished in a container along with water and some sort of sandy-grit
stuff,
> >> seal it, and put it on a mechanism that rotates it, sorta like the way
a
> >> front loader washing machine works. I've been wondering if I could
put an
> >> unopened jar of that 'natural' peanut butter on one of those mechanisms
for
> >> a while and let it do the mixing for me . . . maybe I'll try it if I
chance
> >> across a cheap one of those gizmos, whatever they're called . . .
> >
> > Rock tumbler.
> >
> > E
> > daughter of a geologist
>
> No, I think in this case he's got it all wrong, and he'd be wanting
> a paint spinner (is that the name?) like they have at the hardware store
> that shakes up a a can of paint.
>
> It would have to be an industrial strength rock tumbler to deal with
> a jar of peanut butter (and better hope the jar is plastic).
>
> And if I had a rock tumbler, it's intended use would be far more
> interesting than using it to mix up peanut butter.
>
> Michael



Yep, a rock tumbler is what I had in mind . . . like the ones at
www.bergsrockshop.com/cgi-bin/product.php?item=Rock%20Tumblers
Put a jar of the good oil-separated PB in one of those drums, or just put
the jar on the turning mechanism, and let it do its work . . . geez, all
this talk of PB has me hungry now . . . and I'm out of bread . . . ugh . . .
--Tock

July 18th 03, 04:23 AM
> If something has food value for humans, chances are it will also have food
> value for other things too, including molds and bacteria. After a while,
it
> tastes a little "off". After tossing a jar or two in this condition, I
> started keeping it in the fridge.


I heard a preacher once who did a sermon around a loaf of white bread . . .
don't remember what the point of it was, but it had something to do with how
she put a loaf of white bread in the trunk of her car, and forgot it for 3
whole weeks. When she happened to find it again, it was as fresh as the
day she bought it. Said something about how if it wasn't good enough for
bacteria to eat, it probably wasn't good enough for people either.
I've noticed how some brands of bread goes bad quicker than others, I figure
the ones that spoil quickest probably have the most nutrients in 'em, so I
stick with the heavy, chewy dark breads.
The things you learn in church . . .
--Tock

July 18th 03, 04:23 AM
> If something has food value for humans, chances are it will also have food
> value for other things too, including molds and bacteria. After a while,
it
> tastes a little "off". After tossing a jar or two in this condition, I
> started keeping it in the fridge.


I heard a preacher once who did a sermon around a loaf of white bread . . .
don't remember what the point of it was, but it had something to do with how
she put a loaf of white bread in the trunk of her car, and forgot it for 3
whole weeks. When she happened to find it again, it was as fresh as the
day she bought it. Said something about how if it wasn't good enough for
bacteria to eat, it probably wasn't good enough for people either.
I've noticed how some brands of bread goes bad quicker than others, I figure
the ones that spoil quickest probably have the most nutrients in 'em, so I
stick with the heavy, chewy dark breads.
The things you learn in church . . .
--Tock

The Real Bev
July 18th 03, 06:33 AM
me wrote:

> So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out? How can you
> really tell when something's ready to be dumped and what stuff is merely
> not as "fresh" as it once was? How long after the freshness date stamp
> on milk expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and cooking?
> Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?

Let your eyes and nose be your guides. If it's furry, throw it out. If
the color is significantly different from what you expect it to be, throw
it out. If you say "WHEW!" when you sniff it, throw it out. If it just
looks disgusting, throw it out.

--
Cheers, Bev
================================================== ================
"Don't sweat it -- it's not real life. It's only ones and zeroes."
-- spaf (1988?)

The Real Bev
July 18th 03, 06:33 AM
me wrote:

> So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out? How can you
> really tell when something's ready to be dumped and what stuff is merely
> not as "fresh" as it once was? How long after the freshness date stamp
> on milk expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and cooking?
> Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?

Let your eyes and nose be your guides. If it's furry, throw it out. If
the color is significantly different from what you expect it to be, throw
it out. If you say "WHEW!" when you sniff it, throw it out. If it just
looks disgusting, throw it out.

--
Cheers, Bev
================================================== ================
"Don't sweat it -- it's not real life. It's only ones and zeroes."
-- spaf (1988?)

Anthony Matonak
July 18th 03, 06:56 AM
The Real Bev wrote:
> Let your eyes and nose be your guides. If it's furry, throw it out. If
> the color is significantly different from what you expect it to be, throw
> it out. If you say "WHEW!" when you sniff it, throw it out. If it just
> looks disgusting, throw it out.

You don't believe in letting people learn by doing? It only takes one
case of food poisoning to teach most people to be wary of rotting food.
Experience really is the most powerful teacher in some circumstances.
If they have someone else standing by with a phone to call the ambulance
then it's likely they wouldn't even die.

Anthony

Anthony Matonak
July 18th 03, 06:56 AM
The Real Bev wrote:
> Let your eyes and nose be your guides. If it's furry, throw it out. If
> the color is significantly different from what you expect it to be, throw
> it out. If you say "WHEW!" when you sniff it, throw it out. If it just
> looks disgusting, throw it out.

You don't believe in letting people learn by doing? It only takes one
case of food poisoning to teach most people to be wary of rotting food.
Experience really is the most powerful teacher in some circumstances.
If they have someone else standing by with a phone to call the ambulance
then it's likely they wouldn't even die.

Anthony

Chloe
July 18th 03, 02:00 PM
> wrote in message
...
>
> I heard a preacher once who did a sermon around a loaf of white bread . .
..
> don't remember what the point of it was, but it had something to do with
how
> she put a loaf of white bread in the trunk of her car, and forgot it for 3
> whole weeks. When she happened to find it again, it was as fresh as the
> day she bought it. Said something about how if it wasn't good enough for
> bacteria to eat, it probably wasn't good enough for people either.
> I've noticed how some brands of bread goes bad quicker than others, I
figure
> the ones that spoil quickest probably have the most nutrients in 'em, so I
> stick with the heavy, chewy dark breads.
> The things you learn in church . . .
> --Tock

Just offhand, did you consider the possibility of a lot of preservatives, as
opposed to anything to do with nutrient qualities?

Chloe
July 18th 03, 02:00 PM
> wrote in message
...
>
> I heard a preacher once who did a sermon around a loaf of white bread . .
..
> don't remember what the point of it was, but it had something to do with
how
> she put a loaf of white bread in the trunk of her car, and forgot it for 3
> whole weeks. When she happened to find it again, it was as fresh as the
> day she bought it. Said something about how if it wasn't good enough for
> bacteria to eat, it probably wasn't good enough for people either.
> I've noticed how some brands of bread goes bad quicker than others, I
figure
> the ones that spoil quickest probably have the most nutrients in 'em, so I
> stick with the heavy, chewy dark breads.
> The things you learn in church . . .
> --Tock

Just offhand, did you consider the possibility of a lot of preservatives, as
opposed to anything to do with nutrient qualities?

July 18th 03, 03:13 PM
"Chloe" > wrote in message
...
> > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > I heard a preacher once who did a sermon around a loaf of white bread .
..
> .
> > don't remember what the point of it was, but it had something to do with
> how
> > she put a loaf of white bread in the trunk of her car, and forgot it for
3
> > whole weeks. When she happened to find it again, it was as fresh as
the
> > day she bought it. Said something about how if it wasn't good enough
for
> > bacteria to eat, it probably wasn't good enough for people either.
> > I've noticed how some brands of bread goes bad quicker than others, I
> figure
> > the ones that spoil quickest probably have the most nutrients in 'em, so
I
> > stick with the heavy, chewy dark breads.
> > The things you learn in church . . .
> > --Tock
>
> Just offhand, did you consider the possibility of a lot of preservatives,
as
> opposed to anything to do with nutrient qualities?
>


It's possible . . . always heard that white bread wasn't as nutritious as
bread who's ingredients hadn't been bleached. Like a hotel, it sounds like
something to check into, though . . .
--Tock

July 18th 03, 03:13 PM
"Chloe" > wrote in message
...
> > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > I heard a preacher once who did a sermon around a loaf of white bread .
..
> .
> > don't remember what the point of it was, but it had something to do with
> how
> > she put a loaf of white bread in the trunk of her car, and forgot it for
3
> > whole weeks. When she happened to find it again, it was as fresh as
the
> > day she bought it. Said something about how if it wasn't good enough
for
> > bacteria to eat, it probably wasn't good enough for people either.
> > I've noticed how some brands of bread goes bad quicker than others, I
> figure
> > the ones that spoil quickest probably have the most nutrients in 'em, so
I
> > stick with the heavy, chewy dark breads.
> > The things you learn in church . . .
> > --Tock
>
> Just offhand, did you consider the possibility of a lot of preservatives,
as
> opposed to anything to do with nutrient qualities?
>


It's possible . . . always heard that white bread wasn't as nutritious as
bread who's ingredients hadn't been bleached. Like a hotel, it sounds like
something to check into, though . . .
--Tock

Tsu Dho Poster
July 18th 03, 03:53 PM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...
> me wrote:
>
> > So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out? How can you
> > really tell when something's ready to be dumped and what stuff is merely
> > not as "fresh" as it once was? How long after the freshness date stamp
> > on milk expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and cooking?
> > Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?
>
> Let your eyes and nose be your guides. If it's furry, throw it out. If
> the color is significantly different from what you expect it to be, throw
> it out. If you say "WHEW!" when you sniff it, throw it out. If it just
> looks disgusting, throw it out.
>

yer describing my (ex) gf........got smart.....threw her out!

Tsu Dho Poster
July 18th 03, 03:53 PM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...
> me wrote:
>
> > So here's the magic question: Should I throw it all out? How can you
> > really tell when something's ready to be dumped and what stuff is merely
> > not as "fresh" as it once was? How long after the freshness date stamp
> > on milk expires will it still be fit for things like cereal and cooking?
> > Does bread usually last longer in the fridge or out?
>
> Let your eyes and nose be your guides. If it's furry, throw it out. If
> the color is significantly different from what you expect it to be, throw
> it out. If you say "WHEW!" when you sniff it, throw it out. If it just
> looks disgusting, throw it out.
>

yer describing my (ex) gf........got smart.....threw her out!

Mogie
July 18th 03, 09:04 PM
I try to write the date somewhere in small print on the container. Just
month and year work for me. The idea of turning stuff upside down is very
good. Mayo will keep much long. So it seems like it would work for other
stuff too.




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Mogie
July 18th 03, 09:04 PM
I try to write the date somewhere in small print on the container. Just
month and year work for me. The idea of turning stuff upside down is very
good. Mayo will keep much long. So it seems like it would work for other
stuff too.




-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----

Don K
July 19th 03, 03:22 AM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...

> So would somebody please list the unseeable and unsmellable pathogens that
> lurk in our food, breaking free to wreak havoc three days after the
> expiration date printed on the package?
>
> The only time I've ever had sickness directly attributable to something I
> ingested was when I stupidly drank streamwater in a popular mountain
> picnic area -- and that was 45 years ago.
>
> If it looks or smells gross, don't eat it. Simple. Exception made for
> Chinese food, of course.

I love Mexican food, but the worst case of food poisoning I've ever
had was from a local restaurant I'll refer to as Taco Vomito.

The food tasted fine, but for 3 days afterwards I was one very
nauseous little puppy. I wonder if it was because they would
sometimes put their carryout orders into used cardboard boxes
labeled "chicken"?

Don

Don K
July 19th 03, 03:22 AM
"The Real Bev" > wrote in message
...

> So would somebody please list the unseeable and unsmellable pathogens that
> lurk in our food, breaking free to wreak havoc three days after the
> expiration date printed on the package?
>
> The only time I've ever had sickness directly attributable to something I
> ingested was when I stupidly drank streamwater in a popular mountain
> picnic area -- and that was 45 years ago.
>
> If it looks or smells gross, don't eat it. Simple. Exception made for
> Chinese food, of course.

I love Mexican food, but the worst case of food poisoning I've ever
had was from a local restaurant I'll refer to as Taco Vomito.

The food tasted fine, but for 3 days afterwards I was one very
nauseous little puppy. I wonder if it was because they would
sometimes put their carryout orders into used cardboard boxes
labeled "chicken"?

Don

The Real Bev
July 19th 03, 05:30 AM
Don K wrote:
>
> "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> ...
>
> > So would somebody please list the unseeable and unsmellable pathogens that
> > lurk in our food, breaking free to wreak havoc three days after the
> > expiration date printed on the package?
> >
> > The only time I've ever had sickness directly attributable to something I
> > ingested was when I stupidly drank streamwater in a popular mountain
> > picnic area -- and that was 45 years ago.
> >
> > If it looks or smells gross, don't eat it. Simple. Exception made for
> > Chinese food, of course.
>
> I love Mexican food, but the worst case of food poisoning I've ever
> had was from a local restaurant I'll refer to as Taco Vomito.
>
> The food tasted fine, but for 3 days afterwards I was one very
> nauseous little puppy. I wonder if it was because they would
> sometimes put their carryout orders into used cardboard boxes
> labeled "chicken"?

I think that comes under the heading of "gross." I ate street tacos in
Tijuana with no ill effects. First place I'd ever had Parmesan cheese on
a taco, and it's definitely good.

--
Cheers,
Bev
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooo
If it weren't for pain, we wouldn't have any fun at all.

The Real Bev
July 19th 03, 05:30 AM
Don K wrote:
>
> "The Real Bev" > wrote in message
> ...
>
> > So would somebody please list the unseeable and unsmellable pathogens that
> > lurk in our food, breaking free to wreak havoc three days after the
> > expiration date printed on the package?
> >
> > The only time I've ever had sickness directly attributable to something I
> > ingested was when I stupidly drank streamwater in a popular mountain
> > picnic area -- and that was 45 years ago.
> >
> > If it looks or smells gross, don't eat it. Simple. Exception made for
> > Chinese food, of course.
>
> I love Mexican food, but the worst case of food poisoning I've ever
> had was from a local restaurant I'll refer to as Taco Vomito.
>
> The food tasted fine, but for 3 days afterwards I was one very
> nauseous little puppy. I wonder if it was because they would
> sometimes put their carryout orders into used cardboard boxes
> labeled "chicken"?

I think that comes under the heading of "gross." I ate street tacos in
Tijuana with no ill effects. First place I'd ever had Parmesan cheese on
a taco, and it's definitely good.

--
Cheers,
Bev
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oooooo
If it weren't for pain, we wouldn't have any fun at all.

lyth
July 20th 03, 10:00 AM
The only time I got food poisoning was on a cruise .
Everything smelled and tasted fine. But..I thought I was gonna' die. They
(cruise meds) claimed it was a virus but I never threw up constantly with
fever like that from any virus.
>
> So would somebody please list the unseeable and unsmellable pathogens that
> lurk in our food, breaking free to wreak havoc three days after the
> expiration date printed on the package?
>
> The only time I've ever had sickness directly attributable to something I
> ingested was when I stupidly drank streamwater in a popular mountain
> picnic area -- and that was 45 years ago.
>
> If it looks or smells gross, don't eat it. Simple. Exception made for
> Chinese food, of course.
>
> --
> Cheers,
> Bev
> ================================================== =======================
> If you are going to try cross-country skiing, start with a small country.

lyth
July 20th 03, 10:00 AM
The only time I got food poisoning was on a cruise .
Everything smelled and tasted fine. But..I thought I was gonna' die. They
(cruise meds) claimed it was a virus but I never threw up constantly with
fever like that from any virus.
>
> So would somebody please list the unseeable and unsmellable pathogens that
> lurk in our food, breaking free to wreak havoc three days after the
> expiration date printed on the package?
>
> The only time I've ever had sickness directly attributable to something I
> ingested was when I stupidly drank streamwater in a popular mountain
> picnic area -- and that was 45 years ago.
>
> If it looks or smells gross, don't eat it. Simple. Exception made for
> Chinese food, of course.
>
> --
> Cheers,
> Bev
> ================================================== =======================
> If you are going to try cross-country skiing, start with a small country.

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