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Bob Benjamin
July 18th 03, 02:18 AM
One way to save a little bit is to use empty everyday-product containers
which are the perfect size to store your stuff.

For example, the following are the perfect size to store the following:

Diskettes:
- An Velveeta box (as a previous reader pointed out)
- An empty 1.89 liter (half US gallon) cardboard milk or orange juice
container.

Audio cassettes:
- Store 12 in an empty Kleenex box. Cut top off.

Videoes:
- 10 videoes fit perfectly in a Reebox size 9 shoe box

Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
for other things that people store?

Nina
July 18th 03, 03:30 AM
Oatmeal boxes- pencils, yarn

"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
...
> One way to save a little bit is to use empty everyday-product containers
> which are the perfect size to store your stuff.
>
> For example, the following are the perfect size to store the following:
>
> Diskettes:
> - An Velveeta box (as a previous reader pointed out)
> - An empty 1.89 liter (half US gallon) cardboard milk or orange juice
> container.
>
> Audio cassettes:
> - Store 12 in an empty Kleenex box. Cut top off.
>
> Videoes:
> - 10 videoes fit perfectly in a Reebox size 9 shoe box
>
> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> for other things that people store?
>
>
>

Nina
July 18th 03, 03:30 AM
Oatmeal boxes- pencils, yarn

"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
...
> One way to save a little bit is to use empty everyday-product containers
> which are the perfect size to store your stuff.
>
> For example, the following are the perfect size to store the following:
>
> Diskettes:
> - An Velveeta box (as a previous reader pointed out)
> - An empty 1.89 liter (half US gallon) cardboard milk or orange juice
> container.
>
> Audio cassettes:
> - Store 12 in an empty Kleenex box. Cut top off.
>
> Videoes:
> - 10 videoes fit perfectly in a Reebox size 9 shoe box
>
> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> for other things that people store?
>
>
>

Don K
July 18th 03, 04:10 AM
"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
...
> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> for other things that people store?

I used to feed my dog 1/2 can of dog food and would keep the
remainder in the refrigerator overnight.

A lid from the Giant brand of yogurt fits a dog food can perfectly.

Don

Don K
July 18th 03, 04:10 AM
"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
...
> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> for other things that people store?

I used to feed my dog 1/2 can of dog food and would keep the
remainder in the refrigerator overnight.

A lid from the Giant brand of yogurt fits a dog food can perfectly.

Don

Dennis
July 18th 03, 05:57 AM
On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 18:18:34 -0600, "Bob Benjamin" >
wrote:

>Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
>for other things that people store?

A human heart fits nicely in a sour cream carton.

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

Dennis
July 18th 03, 05:57 AM
On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 18:18:34 -0600, "Bob Benjamin" >
wrote:

>Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
>for other things that people store?

A human heart fits nicely in a sour cream carton.

the Dennis formerly known as (evil)
--
"There is a fine line between participation and mockery" - Wally

SlinkyToy
July 18th 03, 04:37 PM
Who makes just a pound of soap? Even my test batches are in the 5# range -
which means I pour them in Rubbermaid shoeboxes :)

Slinky
Who has enough soap to supply the entire (former) Russian Army for several
years

"TLB" > wrote in message
...
> "SlinkyToy" > wrote in message
> . ..
> > Baby wipes boxes are great for storing just about any damned thing -
nuts
> &
> > bolts, crayons, makeup. They also make good soap molds (rebatched or
> > unwrapped CP only - I discovered the hard way that soap heating through
> the
> > gel stage will blow out one of those containers). Each vehicle's first
> aid
> > kit lives in one of these boxes; the one in the car is held closed with
> > rubberbands and is velcroed to the inside of the trunk lid, the one in
the
> > truck is velcroed under the passenger seat.
> >
>
> The small Velveeta boxes are perfect for making a pound of soap for
> experimenting.
>
> Tonya
>
>

SlinkyToy
July 18th 03, 04:37 PM
Who makes just a pound of soap? Even my test batches are in the 5# range -
which means I pour them in Rubbermaid shoeboxes :)

Slinky
Who has enough soap to supply the entire (former) Russian Army for several
years

"TLB" > wrote in message
...
> "SlinkyToy" > wrote in message
> . ..
> > Baby wipes boxes are great for storing just about any damned thing -
nuts
> &
> > bolts, crayons, makeup. They also make good soap molds (rebatched or
> > unwrapped CP only - I discovered the hard way that soap heating through
> the
> > gel stage will blow out one of those containers). Each vehicle's first
> aid
> > kit lives in one of these boxes; the one in the car is held closed with
> > rubberbands and is velcroed to the inside of the trunk lid, the one in
the
> > truck is velcroed under the passenger seat.
> >
>
> The small Velveeta boxes are perfect for making a pound of soap for
> experimenting.
>
> Tonya
>
>

George
July 18th 03, 05:01 PM
"myname" > wrote in message
om...
> "Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
>...
> > One way to save a little bit is to use empty everyday-product containers
> > which are the perfect size to store your stuff.
> >
> > For example, the following are the perfect size to store the following:
> >
> > Diskettes:
> > - An Velveeta box (as a previous reader pointed out)
> > - An empty 1.89 liter (half US gallon) cardboard milk or orange juice
> > container.
> >
> > Audio cassettes:
> > - Store 12 in an empty Kleenex box. Cut top off.
> >
> > Videoes:
> > - 10 videoes fit perfectly in a Reebox size 9 shoe box
> >
> > Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> > for other things that people store?
>
> An airplane is the perfect size for storing passengers. It is just
> large enough to allow them to sit upright in rows.

Probably not perfect because sometimes the passengers are damaged after
spending a long time in an optimum storage position...

>
> If you need to store any airline passengers, I suggest you use an
> airplane to do it.

George
July 18th 03, 05:01 PM
"myname" > wrote in message
om...
> "Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
>...
> > One way to save a little bit is to use empty everyday-product containers
> > which are the perfect size to store your stuff.
> >
> > For example, the following are the perfect size to store the following:
> >
> > Diskettes:
> > - An Velveeta box (as a previous reader pointed out)
> > - An empty 1.89 liter (half US gallon) cardboard milk or orange juice
> > container.
> >
> > Audio cassettes:
> > - Store 12 in an empty Kleenex box. Cut top off.
> >
> > Videoes:
> > - 10 videoes fit perfectly in a Reebox size 9 shoe box
> >
> > Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> > for other things that people store?
>
> An airplane is the perfect size for storing passengers. It is just
> large enough to allow them to sit upright in rows.

Probably not perfect because sometimes the passengers are damaged after
spending a long time in an optimum storage position...

>
> If you need to store any airline passengers, I suggest you use an
> airplane to do it.

The Powerful Katrinka
July 18th 03, 05:12 PM
Dennis wrote:

> On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 18:18:34 -0600, "Bob Benjamin" > wrote:
>
>> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size for
>> other things that people store?
>>
> A human heart fits nicely in a sour cream carton.

NOW you tell me.


-- Katrinka

-----------
To email me, please just take away the pain.

The Powerful Katrinka
July 18th 03, 05:12 PM
Dennis wrote:

> On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 18:18:34 -0600, "Bob Benjamin" > wrote:
>
>> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size for
>> other things that people store?
>>
> A human heart fits nicely in a sour cream carton.

NOW you tell me.


-- Katrinka

-----------
To email me, please just take away the pain.

silvasurfa
July 18th 03, 05:41 PM
"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
...

>
> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> for other things that people store?

I use spaghetti sauce jars to store the leftover parts of plastic bags of
lentils, rice etc from the supermarket. I don't buy Tupperware type stuff
anymore because I always seem to end up with mismatched lids etc.

I've got some large empty Quik containers, and I'm thinking of using them to
store fabric circles cut out using the lid as a pattern... thinking of
making a yo-yo bed coverlet using old clothes.

Old baby formula tins are an OK size for short term storage of lots of
foodstuffs, but they look pretty tacky.

silvasurfa
July 18th 03, 05:41 PM
"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
...

>
> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> for other things that people store?

I use spaghetti sauce jars to store the leftover parts of plastic bags of
lentils, rice etc from the supermarket. I don't buy Tupperware type stuff
anymore because I always seem to end up with mismatched lids etc.

I've got some large empty Quik containers, and I'm thinking of using them to
store fabric circles cut out using the lid as a pattern... thinking of
making a yo-yo bed coverlet using old clothes.

Old baby formula tins are an OK size for short term storage of lots of
foodstuffs, but they look pretty tacky.

ares
July 18th 03, 08:08 PM
OK, now that you gave an example this question doesn't seem as off the wall.
The cardboard boxes that have the frozen cheesecakes at Sam's club are
perfect to make those stand up magazine holders. You cut a triangle shape
front and back on the top corner and also take off the top edge where you'd
slide in the magazines.
ares


"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
...
> One way to save a little bit is to use empty everyday-product containers
> which are the perfect size to store your stuff.
>
> For example, the following are the perfect size to store the following:
>
> Diskettes:
> - An Velveeta box (as a previous reader pointed out)
> - An empty 1.89 liter (half US gallon) cardboard milk or orange juice
> container.
>
> Audio cassettes:
> - Store 12 in an empty Kleenex box. Cut top off.
>
> Videoes:
> - 10 videoes fit perfectly in a Reebox size 9 shoe box
>
> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> for other things that people store?
>
>
>

ares
July 18th 03, 08:08 PM
OK, now that you gave an example this question doesn't seem as off the wall.
The cardboard boxes that have the frozen cheesecakes at Sam's club are
perfect to make those stand up magazine holders. You cut a triangle shape
front and back on the top corner and also take off the top edge where you'd
slide in the magazines.
ares


"Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
...
> One way to save a little bit is to use empty everyday-product containers
> which are the perfect size to store your stuff.
>
> For example, the following are the perfect size to store the following:
>
> Diskettes:
> - An Velveeta box (as a previous reader pointed out)
> - An empty 1.89 liter (half US gallon) cardboard milk or orange juice
> container.
>
> Audio cassettes:
> - Store 12 in an empty Kleenex box. Cut top off.
>
> Videoes:
> - 10 videoes fit perfectly in a Reebox size 9 shoe box
>
> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> for other things that people store?
>
>
>

Neil
July 18th 03, 08:54 PM
Dennis > wrote in message >...
> On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 18:18:34 -0600, "Bob Benjamin" >
> wrote:
>
> >Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> >for other things that people store?
>
> A human heart fits nicely in a sour cream carton.

LOL!

The clear plastic, rectangular Ferrero-Rocher candy boxes make a great
case for audio MiniDiscs. Back at my job, I use one of these boxes for
all my pens and markers. See:

http://www.indiagiftcenter.com/ferro4.jpg

And the candy's good also! It's sold in local drugstores,
supermarkets, etc.

I won't keep any containers made of paper or cardboard. They look
junky to me and they won't last either. I prefer either plastic or
metal containers for my stuff, and I especially prefer anything clear
or with holes that let me see what's inside. I'm willing to spend some
$$$ on storage containers if they're clear and I can see what's inside
easily. Being able to see inside containers saves me a lot of time
when I need to look inside. One source:

http://www.organizes-it.com/plastic.htm

Also, I used to work on a loading dock and I noticed that cardboard
boxes attract cockroaches.

For MiniDisc and other portable audio gear, the following type of
organizer will store that gear nicely in a notebook. (BTW, I can't
resist adding that the reason you'll find such gear at the following
site is because I suggested it.) I think portable audio gear is
probably much safer in a notebook:

http://www.minidiscaccess.com/item.html?PRID=997812

I find organizers like this in a large office-supply store. I often
find good storage doodads and ideas in such stores. Organize-It and
similar sellers and stores have a lot of good containers and ideas,
such as the appliance and bed risers mentioned in another recent MCFL
thread.

Another adaptation of something meant for another purpose: I've seen
photographers use Tupperware and other plastic lids as lens caps when
the front of the lens had a lens shade (or whatever that thing is
called) attached. The plastic lid fit over the entire lens shade, so
that the lid protected the lens and there was no need to take the
shade off.

I've also seen home-made radio receivers in coffee cans and cigar
boxes, as well as a pocket-sized electric guitar amp built into a
cigarette box. I'm always intrigued by anything where someone
obviously must have looked at something and said, "that would be
almost perfect for creating something completely different."

> the Dennis formerly known as (evil)

Neil
July 18th 03, 08:54 PM
Dennis > wrote in message >...
> On Thu, 17 Jul 2003 18:18:34 -0600, "Bob Benjamin" >
> wrote:
>
> >Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> >for other things that people store?
>
> A human heart fits nicely in a sour cream carton.

LOL!

The clear plastic, rectangular Ferrero-Rocher candy boxes make a great
case for audio MiniDiscs. Back at my job, I use one of these boxes for
all my pens and markers. See:

http://www.indiagiftcenter.com/ferro4.jpg

And the candy's good also! It's sold in local drugstores,
supermarkets, etc.

I won't keep any containers made of paper or cardboard. They look
junky to me and they won't last either. I prefer either plastic or
metal containers for my stuff, and I especially prefer anything clear
or with holes that let me see what's inside. I'm willing to spend some
$$$ on storage containers if they're clear and I can see what's inside
easily. Being able to see inside containers saves me a lot of time
when I need to look inside. One source:

http://www.organizes-it.com/plastic.htm

Also, I used to work on a loading dock and I noticed that cardboard
boxes attract cockroaches.

For MiniDisc and other portable audio gear, the following type of
organizer will store that gear nicely in a notebook. (BTW, I can't
resist adding that the reason you'll find such gear at the following
site is because I suggested it.) I think portable audio gear is
probably much safer in a notebook:

http://www.minidiscaccess.com/item.html?PRID=997812

I find organizers like this in a large office-supply store. I often
find good storage doodads and ideas in such stores. Organize-It and
similar sellers and stores have a lot of good containers and ideas,
such as the appliance and bed risers mentioned in another recent MCFL
thread.

Another adaptation of something meant for another purpose: I've seen
photographers use Tupperware and other plastic lids as lens caps when
the front of the lens had a lens shade (or whatever that thing is
called) attached. The plastic lid fit over the entire lens shade, so
that the lid protected the lens and there was no need to take the
shade off.

I've also seen home-made radio receivers in coffee cans and cigar
boxes, as well as a pocket-sized electric guitar amp built into a
cigarette box. I'm always intrigued by anything where someone
obviously must have looked at something and said, "that would be
almost perfect for creating something completely different."

> the Dennis formerly known as (evil)

Neil
July 18th 03, 09:03 PM
"George" > wrote in message >...
> "myname" > wrote in message
> om...
> > "Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
> >...

(snip)

> Probably not perfect because sometimes the passengers are damaged after
> spending a long time in an optimum storage position...
>
> >
> > If you need to store any airline passengers, I suggest you use an
> > airplane to do it.

This is starting to remind me of the recent MCFL comments about homemade coffins...

Neil
July 18th 03, 09:03 PM
"George" > wrote in message >...
> "myname" > wrote in message
> om...
> > "Bob Benjamin" > wrote in message
> >...

(snip)

> Probably not perfect because sometimes the passengers are damaged after
> spending a long time in an optimum storage position...
>
> >
> > If you need to store any airline passengers, I suggest you use an
> > airplane to do it.

This is starting to remind me of the recent MCFL comments about homemade coffins...

TLB
July 18th 03, 10:10 PM
New combo's of oils, scents, ect. Rather than finding out you dislike a
combination or the combination doesn't behave how you expect. I can't
afford to not like an 8 lb batch of soap.

Tonya

"Derald Martin" > wrote in message
...
> "TLB" > wrote:
>
> >The small Velveeta boxes are perfect for making a pound of soap for
> >experimenting.
> Dare I ask what sorts of experiments one performs on/with/to a
> pound of soap :-)?
> --
> Derald

TLB
July 18th 03, 10:10 PM
New combo's of oils, scents, ect. Rather than finding out you dislike a
combination or the combination doesn't behave how you expect. I can't
afford to not like an 8 lb batch of soap.

Tonya

"Derald Martin" > wrote in message
...
> "TLB" > wrote:
>
> >The small Velveeta boxes are perfect for making a pound of soap for
> >experimenting.
> Dare I ask what sorts of experiments one performs on/with/to a
> pound of soap :-)?
> --
> Derald

jean and bill
July 18th 03, 10:13 PM
In article >,
says...
> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> > for other things that people store?
>
>
The clear plastic containers that strawberries, etc. come in are great
for many things, there are quite a few different sizes available
depending on what's sold in them.

Jeannie
--
To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

jean and bill
July 18th 03, 10:13 PM
In article >,
says...
> Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> > for other things that people store?
>
>
The clear plastic containers that strawberries, etc. come in are great
for many things, there are quite a few different sizes available
depending on what's sold in them.

Jeannie
--
To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

Anthony Matonak
July 19th 03, 09:22 AM
suzn wrote:
> "SlinkyToy" > wrote in message
>
>>Baby wipes boxes are great for storing just about any damned thing
>
> I work in the infant room at a pre-school and I save all the baby wipe
> containers for storage. They stack nicely on a shelf too.

So how many infants fit on the shelf or in the containers anyhow?

Anthony

Anthony Matonak
July 19th 03, 09:22 AM
suzn wrote:
> "SlinkyToy" > wrote in message
>
>>Baby wipes boxes are great for storing just about any damned thing
>
> I work in the infant room at a pre-school and I save all the baby wipe
> containers for storage. They stack nicely on a shelf too.

So how many infants fit on the shelf or in the containers anyhow?

Anthony

Bonita and/or William F. Kale
July 19th 03, 01:26 PM
Cereal boxes cut on the diagonal for magazines.
Our local Chinese take-out place uses those rectangular aluminum
pans with plastic lids. A dozen brownies to take to church will
fit in one, and you don't have to get the pan back.

A big coffee can (the kind that will hold three pounds of coffee
if you pack it, but these days they fluff it and only put in 39
oz) will hold five pounds of sugar or rice. It won't hold five
pounds of flour, though; you have to put the excess in something
else, or another can.
I've used those big coffee cans for canisters for years; they fit
on a shorter shelf than most regular canisters do. In fact, they
used to have promotions in which they sold the coffee in pretty
cans for that purpose.

Bonita






jean and bill wrote:
>
> In article >,
> says...
> > Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> > > for other things that people store?
> >
> >
> The clear plastic containers that strawberries, etc. come in are great
> for many things, there are quite a few different sizes available
> depending on what's sold in them.
>
> Jeannie
> --
> To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

Bonita and/or William F. Kale
July 19th 03, 01:26 PM
Cereal boxes cut on the diagonal for magazines.
Our local Chinese take-out place uses those rectangular aluminum
pans with plastic lids. A dozen brownies to take to church will
fit in one, and you don't have to get the pan back.

A big coffee can (the kind that will hold three pounds of coffee
if you pack it, but these days they fluff it and only put in 39
oz) will hold five pounds of sugar or rice. It won't hold five
pounds of flour, though; you have to put the excess in something
else, or another can.
I've used those big coffee cans for canisters for years; they fit
on a shorter shelf than most regular canisters do. In fact, they
used to have promotions in which they sold the coffee in pretty
cans for that purpose.

Bonita






jean and bill wrote:
>
> In article >,
> says...
> > Are you aware of any other types of containers that are the perfect size
> > > for other things that people store?
> >
> >
> The clear plastic containers that strawberries, etc. come in are great
> for many things, there are quite a few different sizes available
> depending on what's sold in them.
>
> Jeannie
> --
> To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

Don K
July 19th 03, 02:31 PM
Glass baby food jars are great for storing sorted hardware like
screws, nuts, washers, etc. They are just the right size for small
hardware and you can easily see what is in each jar.

If you have a baby, you'll end up buying a couple hundred jars
anyway, so you might as well get further use out of them.

I still have 50 year-old baby food jars full of hardware that
my father collected.

Don

Don K
July 19th 03, 02:31 PM
Glass baby food jars are great for storing sorted hardware like
screws, nuts, washers, etc. They are just the right size for small
hardware and you can easily see what is in each jar.

If you have a baby, you'll end up buying a couple hundred jars
anyway, so you might as well get further use out of them.

I still have 50 year-old baby food jars full of hardware that
my father collected.

Don

Nina
July 19th 03, 07:58 PM
"Don K" > wrote in message
...
> Glass baby food jars are great for storing sorted hardware like
> screws, nuts, washers, etc. They are just the right size for small
> hardware and you can easily see what is in each jar.
>
> If you have a baby, you'll end up buying a couple hundred jars
> anyway, so you might as well get further use out of them.
>

Bah, I had maybe 20. No way would I spend 50 cents for 2 oz of squash, when
I can get it for 39cents/lb at the store and pop it in the blender myself.

Nina
July 19th 03, 07:58 PM
"Don K" > wrote in message
...
> Glass baby food jars are great for storing sorted hardware like
> screws, nuts, washers, etc. They are just the right size for small
> hardware and you can easily see what is in each jar.
>
> If you have a baby, you'll end up buying a couple hundred jars
> anyway, so you might as well get further use out of them.
>

Bah, I had maybe 20. No way would I spend 50 cents for 2 oz of squash, when
I can get it for 39cents/lb at the store and pop it in the blender myself.

Patricia
July 19th 03, 09:30 PM
A large size Windex bottle makes a great container for my clorox and water
mix.

I use it to spray my porch furniture (after dusting it lightly). The spray
conconction removes all the black material that collects in the cracks and
it's easy to just hose it off to complete the job.

Makes life in Florida a bit simpler. (G)

Save several...the cloros mixture affects the spray nozzle after a while.

Patricia

Patricia
July 19th 03, 09:30 PM
A large size Windex bottle makes a great container for my clorox and water
mix.

I use it to spray my porch furniture (after dusting it lightly). The spray
conconction removes all the black material that collects in the cracks and
it's easy to just hose it off to complete the job.

Makes life in Florida a bit simpler. (G)

Save several...the cloros mixture affects the spray nozzle after a while.

Patricia

July 19th 03, 11:27 PM
>A large size Windex bottle makes a great
> container for my clorox and water mix.

Since Windex contains ammonia, be sure to wash out the bottle thoroughly
before putting bleach into it.

Speaking of, how long can you keep bleach and water mixture? I've read
that it loses effectiveness fairly quickly.

Diva

July 19th 03, 11:27 PM
>A large size Windex bottle makes a great
> container for my clorox and water mix.

Since Windex contains ammonia, be sure to wash out the bottle thoroughly
before putting bleach into it.

Speaking of, how long can you keep bleach and water mixture? I've read
that it loses effectiveness fairly quickly.

Diva

Patricia
July 19th 03, 11:58 PM
Hi, Diva:

> From:

>> A large size Windex bottle makes a great
>> container for my clorox and water mix.
>
> Since Windex contains ammonia, be sure to wash out the bottle thoroughly
> before putting bleach into it.

Yes, I should have mentioned that. I do rinse it out thoroughly.
>
> Speaking of, how long can you keep bleach and water mixture? I've read
> that it loses effectiveness fairly quickly.

By the time I have done six chairs, a large table, two small tables, a lamp
and shade and a lounge...I have filled it several times. There usually isn't
much left..if there is I pour it on any discolorations on the pool deck.

Not much goes to waste in this house. LOL

Patricia

Patricia
July 19th 03, 11:58 PM
Hi, Diva:

> From:

>> A large size Windex bottle makes a great
>> container for my clorox and water mix.
>
> Since Windex contains ammonia, be sure to wash out the bottle thoroughly
> before putting bleach into it.

Yes, I should have mentioned that. I do rinse it out thoroughly.
>
> Speaking of, how long can you keep bleach and water mixture? I've read
> that it loses effectiveness fairly quickly.

By the time I have done six chairs, a large table, two small tables, a lamp
and shade and a lounge...I have filled it several times. There usually isn't
much left..if there is I pour it on any discolorations on the pool deck.

Not much goes to waste in this house. LOL

Patricia

SlinkyToy
July 20th 03, 12:28 AM
We didn't use babyfood at all -- the boy started on cheese cubes, cheerios
and banana chunks when he was 10mos old and already had 8 teeth...

Fortunately lots of moms at our preschool DO use babyfood, so when I need
jars I just post a note on the bulletin board.

"Don K" > wrote in message
...

> If you have a baby, you'll end up buying a couple hundred jars
> anyway, so you might as well get further use out of them.
>
> I still have 50 year-old baby food jars full of hardware that
> my father collected.
>
> Don
>
>

SlinkyToy
July 20th 03, 12:28 AM
We didn't use babyfood at all -- the boy started on cheese cubes, cheerios
and banana chunks when he was 10mos old and already had 8 teeth...

Fortunately lots of moms at our preschool DO use babyfood, so when I need
jars I just post a note on the bulletin board.

"Don K" > wrote in message
...

> If you have a baby, you'll end up buying a couple hundred jars
> anyway, so you might as well get further use out of them.
>
> I still have 50 year-old baby food jars full of hardware that
> my father collected.
>
> Don
>
>

July 20th 03, 01:35 AM
Hi Patricia!

Thanks for the info, sounds like you make the bleach water solution
fresh every day, which is pretty much what the information I read said
to do.

What dilution do you use - how weak or strong?

Diva

July 20th 03, 01:35 AM
Hi Patricia!

Thanks for the info, sounds like you make the bleach water solution
fresh every day, which is pretty much what the information I read said
to do.

What dilution do you use - how weak or strong?

Diva

ares
July 20th 03, 02:40 AM
I find that the clorox cleanup bottles do better as the sprayer goes bad
quickly in some of those other bottles.
ares


"Patricia" > wrote in message
...
> A large size Windex bottle makes a great container for my clorox and water
> mix.
>
> I use it to spray my porch furniture (after dusting it lightly). The spray
> conconction removes all the black material that collects in the cracks and
> it's easy to just hose it off to complete the job.
>
> Makes life in Florida a bit simpler. (G)
>
> Save several...the cloros mixture affects the spray nozzle after a while.
>
> Patricia
>

ares
July 20th 03, 02:40 AM
I find that the clorox cleanup bottles do better as the sprayer goes bad
quickly in some of those other bottles.
ares


"Patricia" > wrote in message
...
> A large size Windex bottle makes a great container for my clorox and water
> mix.
>
> I use it to spray my porch furniture (after dusting it lightly). The spray
> conconction removes all the black material that collects in the cracks and
> it's easy to just hose it off to complete the job.
>
> Makes life in Florida a bit simpler. (G)
>
> Save several...the cloros mixture affects the spray nozzle after a while.
>
> Patricia
>

Patricia
July 20th 03, 03:01 AM
> From: "ares" >
> Newsgroups: misc.consumers.frugal-living
> Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2003 00:40:44 GMT
> Subject: Re: Are there other perfect sized containers for other things?
>
> I find that the clorox cleanup bottles do better as the sprayer goes bad
> quickly in some of those other bottles.
> ares
>
Good idea !

I save Windex bottles only because I use it a lot for general cleaning and
always seem to have empties.

Next time.....Clorix Clean up ...LOL

Thanks,
Patricia

Patricia
July 20th 03, 03:01 AM
> From: "ares" >
> Newsgroups: misc.consumers.frugal-living
> Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2003 00:40:44 GMT
> Subject: Re: Are there other perfect sized containers for other things?
>
> I find that the clorox cleanup bottles do better as the sprayer goes bad
> quickly in some of those other bottles.
> ares
>
Good idea !

I save Windex bottles only because I use it a lot for general cleaning and
always seem to have empties.

Next time.....Clorix Clean up ...LOL

Thanks,
Patricia

Patricia
July 20th 03, 03:16 AM
> From:

> Thanks for the info, sounds like you make the bleach water solution
> fresh every day, which is pretty much what the information I read said
> to do.
>
> What dilution do you use - how weak or strong?
>
> Diva
=====================

It's all very scientific...LOL

I pour in what seems to be about 2 inches in the empty bottle....then fill
it up with warm water when I do the porch furniture. A friend says she adds
about 2 drops of dish liquid to this mix. I didn't see any real difference.

Have you tried the new Dawn liquid ? It blue and works like a charm on
roasting pans and other gritty stuff. I put some in the pan, fill it with
hot water and in about 15 minutes you can easily wipe away most of the mess.
Couple spots need elbow grease but it's very good.

Even removed some really OLD burnt on stuff I didn't think I could ever get
off.

I like it.

Patricia


>

Patricia
July 20th 03, 03:16 AM
> From:

> Thanks for the info, sounds like you make the bleach water solution
> fresh every day, which is pretty much what the information I read said
> to do.
>
> What dilution do you use - how weak or strong?
>
> Diva
=====================

It's all very scientific...LOL

I pour in what seems to be about 2 inches in the empty bottle....then fill
it up with warm water when I do the porch furniture. A friend says she adds
about 2 drops of dish liquid to this mix. I didn't see any real difference.

Have you tried the new Dawn liquid ? It blue and works like a charm on
roasting pans and other gritty stuff. I put some in the pan, fill it with
hot water and in about 15 minutes you can easily wipe away most of the mess.
Couple spots need elbow grease but it's very good.

Even removed some really OLD burnt on stuff I didn't think I could ever get
off.

I like it.

Patricia


>

Bonita and/or William F. Kale
July 20th 03, 02:26 PM
Question: Why would chlorine bleach lose effectiveness in water,
when it -is- mostly water when you buy it?

Bonita

Pat Meadows wrote:

> As said above in this thread, chlorine bleach itself loses
> effectiveness when mixed with water, so that's kind of a
> PITA - mixing it fresh each time.
>
> Pat

Bonita and/or William F. Kale
July 20th 03, 02:26 PM
Question: Why would chlorine bleach lose effectiveness in water,
when it -is- mostly water when you buy it?

Bonita

Pat Meadows wrote:

> As said above in this thread, chlorine bleach itself loses
> effectiveness when mixed with water, so that's kind of a
> PITA - mixing it fresh each time.
>
> Pat

jean and bill
July 20th 03, 08:19 PM
Chinese soup pint containers are great for holding basket-type coffee
filters, to prevent them from stretching out of shape. I keep the bag
of filters in the basement, and put a "chunk" of filters in the
container in the kitchen.

Jeannie

To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

jean and bill
July 20th 03, 08:19 PM
Chinese soup pint containers are great for holding basket-type coffee
filters, to prevent them from stretching out of shape. I keep the bag
of filters in the basement, and put a "chunk" of filters in the
container in the kitchen.

Jeannie

To reply to me, remove *spamenot* from address.

val189
July 20th 03, 09:21 PM
Oil of Olay facials come in a plastic box which is flat topped and
bottomed, almost a cube, and the lid is hinged.

I like those cubish clear plastic containers various types of rice
come in - stack easily on shelves, has handy grip indentation too.

val

val189
July 20th 03, 09:21 PM
Oil of Olay facials come in a plastic box which is flat topped and
bottomed, almost a cube, and the lid is hinged.

I like those cubish clear plastic containers various types of rice
come in - stack easily on shelves, has handy grip indentation too.

val

ares
July 21st 03, 01:44 AM
I don't understand it; my bleach and water mixture seems to last for weeks;
I spray it in my tea stained cups before I dishwash and the stains come out
fine; I don't have to mix it fresh every day; I don't understand it.
ares


"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 08:26:03 -0400, "Bonita and/or William
> F. Kale" > wrote:
>
> >Question: Why would chlorine bleach lose effectiveness in water,
> >when it -is- mostly water when you buy it?
> >
>
> I asked my husband this. (Chemistry is his field - he has a
> PhD in it - so he's a fairly good person to ask this,
> although chlorine bleach as such wasn't the subject of his
> dissertation or anything like that.)
>
> He said: "When you buy it, it has stabilizer. The amount
> of stabilizer added by the manufacturer is dependent on the
> dilution of the bleach. When you add more water, the
> stabilizer is no longer sufficient."
>
> Pat

ares
July 21st 03, 01:44 AM
I don't understand it; my bleach and water mixture seems to last for weeks;
I spray it in my tea stained cups before I dishwash and the stains come out
fine; I don't have to mix it fresh every day; I don't understand it.
ares


"Pat Meadows" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 20 Jul 2003 08:26:03 -0400, "Bonita and/or William
> F. Kale" > wrote:
>
> >Question: Why would chlorine bleach lose effectiveness in water,
> >when it -is- mostly water when you buy it?
> >
>
> I asked my husband this. (Chemistry is his field - he has a
> PhD in it - so he's a fairly good person to ask this,
> although chlorine bleach as such wasn't the subject of his
> dissertation or anything like that.)
>
> He said: "When you buy it, it has stabilizer. The amount
> of stabilizer added by the manufacturer is dependent on the
> dilution of the bleach. When you add more water, the
> stabilizer is no longer sufficient."
>
> Pat

Tess
August 1st 03, 12:31 AM
What a good thread! I don't believe anyone mentioned Pringles cans, which
are good for a whole raft of things. For one thing, you can put them over
tent stakes, to keep from stubbing your toe in the night. Also good for
knitting needles and spaghetti. No kids here, but I have heard that they'll
hold three baby food jars, like, for travelling.

Once we had to take our wedding champagne flutes travelling with us so we
could have them for our anniversary; I packed each of them in a Pringles
can, liberally padded with Easter grass. ( Bought on sale at Big Lots' after
Easter sale for next to nothing. )

Frugally,

- Tess




> >
> > I still have 50 year-old baby food jars full of hardware that
> > my father collected.
> >
> > Don
> >
> >
>
>
>

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