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Human Bean
July 20th 03, 07:19 AM
I need to get rid of these roaches. From my internet research,
there's 2 cost effective method: The first one is using baking soda
with sugar combo. The second one is boric acid with flour combo.
None of them are practical in my case because we have electric fans
swirling around all day. I wouldn't want to breathe those boric acid
all day. I would also want something that would last more than 3
weeks without reapplying.

My only option is to create a roach motel. Maybe use a boric acid,
flour, and butter recipe, roll them into a ball and stick it somewhere
dark. Does this work? Won't this stink for a while? I want a bait
that can attrack roaches from half a mile away. We also have a bit of
rat problems so this concoction might just be eaten by those critters.
I guess what I want is a roach-killing recipe that can be molded into
a solid ball (so the electric fans won't blow it away), and attracts
roaches but not rats. ;p

ares
July 20th 03, 03:10 PM
I'll be watching this topic too; just yesterday I was made aware of a bad
roach infestation of a tenant. I spent 3 hours just trying to help clean
their cabinets and spray the corners with Ortho home defense (hope that
works), but I feel their entire kitchen and bathroom cabinets, and
appliances have to be 'detailed' like you detail a car, wiping down
everything and getting into every crevice to get them out of there first.
They seemed to think I need to get an exterminator; well, if the chemicals
penetrate every place where these buggers are hiding, then that's pretty
potent stuff that I wouldn't want to be exposed to, PLUS they showed me the
roaches in the drawers and it was just nasty in there, like I would have
been embarrased to show someone my drawers if they looked like that without
the bugs. Of course, my place is connected to theirs and I don't even HAVE
that problem.
Anyway, someone told me that putting stuff in the freezer kills roaches and
their eggs; I wondered that when inquiring about how to get ones that are
inside the electronics of a microwave oven. I guess you let the thing warm
up again before you try plugging it in and using it.
But thanks too for the ideas about the boric acid and baking soda, etc.
ares

"Human Bean" > wrote in message
m...
> I need to get rid of these roaches. From my internet research,
> there's 2 cost effective method: The first one is using baking soda
> with sugar combo. The second one is boric acid with flour combo.
> None of them are practical in my case because we have electric fans
> swirling around all day. I wouldn't want to breathe those boric acid
> all day. I would also want something that would last more than 3
> weeks without reapplying.
>
> My only option is to create a roach motel. Maybe use a boric acid,
> flour, and butter recipe, roll them into a ball and stick it somewhere
> dark. Does this work? Won't this stink for a while? I want a bait
> that can attrack roaches from half a mile away. We also have a bit of
> rat problems so this concoction might just be eaten by those critters.
> I guess what I want is a roach-killing recipe that can be molded into
> a solid ball (so the electric fans won't blow it away), and attracts
> roaches but not rats. ;p

ares
July 20th 03, 03:10 PM
I'll be watching this topic too; just yesterday I was made aware of a bad
roach infestation of a tenant. I spent 3 hours just trying to help clean
their cabinets and spray the corners with Ortho home defense (hope that
works), but I feel their entire kitchen and bathroom cabinets, and
appliances have to be 'detailed' like you detail a car, wiping down
everything and getting into every crevice to get them out of there first.
They seemed to think I need to get an exterminator; well, if the chemicals
penetrate every place where these buggers are hiding, then that's pretty
potent stuff that I wouldn't want to be exposed to, PLUS they showed me the
roaches in the drawers and it was just nasty in there, like I would have
been embarrased to show someone my drawers if they looked like that without
the bugs. Of course, my place is connected to theirs and I don't even HAVE
that problem.
Anyway, someone told me that putting stuff in the freezer kills roaches and
their eggs; I wondered that when inquiring about how to get ones that are
inside the electronics of a microwave oven. I guess you let the thing warm
up again before you try plugging it in and using it.
But thanks too for the ideas about the boric acid and baking soda, etc.
ares

"Human Bean" > wrote in message
m...
> I need to get rid of these roaches. From my internet research,
> there's 2 cost effective method: The first one is using baking soda
> with sugar combo. The second one is boric acid with flour combo.
> None of them are practical in my case because we have electric fans
> swirling around all day. I wouldn't want to breathe those boric acid
> all day. I would also want something that would last more than 3
> weeks without reapplying.
>
> My only option is to create a roach motel. Maybe use a boric acid,
> flour, and butter recipe, roll them into a ball and stick it somewhere
> dark. Does this work? Won't this stink for a while? I want a bait
> that can attrack roaches from half a mile away. We also have a bit of
> rat problems so this concoction might just be eaten by those critters.
> I guess what I want is a roach-killing recipe that can be molded into
> a solid ball (so the electric fans won't blow it away), and attracts
> roaches but not rats. ;p

July 20th 03, 06:48 PM
>
>"Human Bean" > wrote in message
m...
>> I need to get rid of these roaches. From my internet research,
>> there's 2 cost effective method: The first one is using baking soda
>> with sugar combo. The second one is boric acid with flour combo.
>> None of them are practical in my case because we have electric fans
>> swirling around all day. I wouldn't want to breathe those boric acid
>> all day. I would also want something that would last more than 3
>> weeks without reapplying.
>>
>> My only option is to create a roach motel. Maybe use a boric acid,
>> flour, and butter recipe, roll them into a ball and stick it somewhere
>> dark. Does this work? Won't this stink for a while? I want a bait
>> that can attrack roaches from half a mile away. We also have a bit of
>> rat problems so this concoction might just be eaten by those critters.
>> I guess what I want is a roach-killing recipe that can be molded into
>> a solid ball (so the electric fans won't blow it away), and attracts
>> roaches but not rats. ;p
>
"ares" > wrote:

>I'll be watching this topic too; just yesterday I was made aware of a bad
>roach infestation of a tenant. I spent 3 hours just trying to help clean
>their cabinets and spray the corners with Ortho home defense (hope that
>works), but I feel their entire kitchen and bathroom cabinets, and
>appliances have to be 'detailed' like you detail a car, wiping down
>everything and getting into every crevice to get them out of there first.
>They seemed to think I need to get an exterminator; well, if the chemicals
>penetrate every place where these buggers are hiding, then that's pretty
>potent stuff that I wouldn't want to be exposed to, PLUS they showed me the
>roaches in the drawers and it was just nasty in there, like I would have
>been embarrased to show someone my drawers if they looked like that without
>the bugs. Of course, my place is connected to theirs and I don't even HAVE
>that problem.
>Anyway, someone told me that putting stuff in the freezer kills roaches and
>their eggs; I wondered that when inquiring about how to get ones that are
>inside the electronics of a microwave oven. I guess you let the thing warm
>up again before you try plugging it in and using it.
>But thanks too for the ideas about the boric acid and baking soda, etc.
>ares

Please don't top post. On a subject like this it just makes more work for
anyone wanting to respond to both posts.

Roaches are attracted to heat. The will be around the coils of a refrigerator,
in the back of many electrical appliances, in wall switches and sockets,
lighting fixtures, hot water heaters, and the like. A dusting of boric acid in
those places will severely reduce any infestation. OTOH, if those areas are
NOT addressed, it can be next to impossible to clear a place. Think of any
place with moisture and heat. The overflow pipe of a tub bath or sink is often
a hiding place. Boric acid dust is no big deal to humans and pets. Sugar and
baking soda is something that is never used professionally and I doubt it would
do much. Rancid butter is a smell I'd rather not have around.

July 20th 03, 06:48 PM
>
>"Human Bean" > wrote in message
m...
>> I need to get rid of these roaches. From my internet research,
>> there's 2 cost effective method: The first one is using baking soda
>> with sugar combo. The second one is boric acid with flour combo.
>> None of them are practical in my case because we have electric fans
>> swirling around all day. I wouldn't want to breathe those boric acid
>> all day. I would also want something that would last more than 3
>> weeks without reapplying.
>>
>> My only option is to create a roach motel. Maybe use a boric acid,
>> flour, and butter recipe, roll them into a ball and stick it somewhere
>> dark. Does this work? Won't this stink for a while? I want a bait
>> that can attrack roaches from half a mile away. We also have a bit of
>> rat problems so this concoction might just be eaten by those critters.
>> I guess what I want is a roach-killing recipe that can be molded into
>> a solid ball (so the electric fans won't blow it away), and attracts
>> roaches but not rats. ;p
>
"ares" > wrote:

>I'll be watching this topic too; just yesterday I was made aware of a bad
>roach infestation of a tenant. I spent 3 hours just trying to help clean
>their cabinets and spray the corners with Ortho home defense (hope that
>works), but I feel their entire kitchen and bathroom cabinets, and
>appliances have to be 'detailed' like you detail a car, wiping down
>everything and getting into every crevice to get them out of there first.
>They seemed to think I need to get an exterminator; well, if the chemicals
>penetrate every place where these buggers are hiding, then that's pretty
>potent stuff that I wouldn't want to be exposed to, PLUS they showed me the
>roaches in the drawers and it was just nasty in there, like I would have
>been embarrased to show someone my drawers if they looked like that without
>the bugs. Of course, my place is connected to theirs and I don't even HAVE
>that problem.
>Anyway, someone told me that putting stuff in the freezer kills roaches and
>their eggs; I wondered that when inquiring about how to get ones that are
>inside the electronics of a microwave oven. I guess you let the thing warm
>up again before you try plugging it in and using it.
>But thanks too for the ideas about the boric acid and baking soda, etc.
>ares

Please don't top post. On a subject like this it just makes more work for
anyone wanting to respond to both posts.

Roaches are attracted to heat. The will be around the coils of a refrigerator,
in the back of many electrical appliances, in wall switches and sockets,
lighting fixtures, hot water heaters, and the like. A dusting of boric acid in
those places will severely reduce any infestation. OTOH, if those areas are
NOT addressed, it can be next to impossible to clear a place. Think of any
place with moisture and heat. The overflow pipe of a tub bath or sink is often
a hiding place. Boric acid dust is no big deal to humans and pets. Sugar and
baking soda is something that is never used professionally and I doubt it would
do much. Rancid butter is a smell I'd rather not have around.

July 20th 03, 11:30 PM
I once lived in an apartment with a roach problem . . . I experimented with
electricity. What I did was, I found some 1" wide aluminum tape, and put
two long pieces on the tiled sink area (don't want to do this on anything
that might burn) about 1/4" apart. I hooked each piece to the output of a
variable transformer (110 volts in, 0 to 2000 volts out), caught a few bugs
in a glass, put the glass upside down over the 'electrodes' and waited for
the boogers to step on both strips at the same time. I discovered through
trial and error that 600 volts is most effective for zapping roaches. Much
more, and parts of their anatomy just vaporize, and the bug walks away.
Much less, and they jump a bit, and walk away.
Since I lived alone at the time, I didn't have to consider other folks
getting up in the middle of the night and forgetting the system was on while
getting a drink of water. But every night I'd turn it on, and the next
morning I'd find between 50 and 100 dead roaches. Yah, the system worked
pretty well, it just wasn't particularly safe, probably something the
Underwriter's Laboratories wouldn't certify.
If it's a roach trap you want, you might try a plastic bucket with the two
strips of aluminum tape 3" from the top, connected to 600 volts, with a
porus cover and something roaches like to eat on the bottom. When the
critters walk into the trap and down the sides, as soon as they hit the two
electrified strips, they'd fall off, and wouldn't be able to climb back up.
Again, this wouldn't be the safest gizmo in the world, and nothing you'd
want if you have pets or children around, but it'd be safer than laying 600
volts out on your kitchen counter. And it just might work.
For an electrical source, you might could use maybe 60 nine-volt batteries
(those square ones) . . . they'd probably last a pretty good while, since
the only current used would be the moment the roach was getting 'juiced.'
Or you could trek down to Radio Shack and see if they can get a 110 to 600
volt transformer, or maybe dig one out of an old TV or radio. Or eBay . .
..
Just an idea . . .
--Tock

July 20th 03, 11:30 PM
I once lived in an apartment with a roach problem . . . I experimented with
electricity. What I did was, I found some 1" wide aluminum tape, and put
two long pieces on the tiled sink area (don't want to do this on anything
that might burn) about 1/4" apart. I hooked each piece to the output of a
variable transformer (110 volts in, 0 to 2000 volts out), caught a few bugs
in a glass, put the glass upside down over the 'electrodes' and waited for
the boogers to step on both strips at the same time. I discovered through
trial and error that 600 volts is most effective for zapping roaches. Much
more, and parts of their anatomy just vaporize, and the bug walks away.
Much less, and they jump a bit, and walk away.
Since I lived alone at the time, I didn't have to consider other folks
getting up in the middle of the night and forgetting the system was on while
getting a drink of water. But every night I'd turn it on, and the next
morning I'd find between 50 and 100 dead roaches. Yah, the system worked
pretty well, it just wasn't particularly safe, probably something the
Underwriter's Laboratories wouldn't certify.
If it's a roach trap you want, you might try a plastic bucket with the two
strips of aluminum tape 3" from the top, connected to 600 volts, with a
porus cover and something roaches like to eat on the bottom. When the
critters walk into the trap and down the sides, as soon as they hit the two
electrified strips, they'd fall off, and wouldn't be able to climb back up.
Again, this wouldn't be the safest gizmo in the world, and nothing you'd
want if you have pets or children around, but it'd be safer than laying 600
volts out on your kitchen counter. And it just might work.
For an electrical source, you might could use maybe 60 nine-volt batteries
(those square ones) . . . they'd probably last a pretty good while, since
the only current used would be the moment the roach was getting 'juiced.'
Or you could trek down to Radio Shack and see if they can get a 110 to 600
volt transformer, or maybe dig one out of an old TV or radio. Or eBay . .
..
Just an idea . . .
--Tock

SoCalMike
July 21st 03, 02:17 AM
"Human Bean" > wrote in message
m...
> I need to get rid of these roaches. From my internet research,
> there's 2 cost effective method: The first one is using baking soda
> with sugar combo. The second one is boric acid with flour combo.

boric acid sprinkled along the baseboards

> None of them are practical in my case because we have electric fans
> swirling around all day. I wouldn't want to breathe those boric acid

unless you have the fans aimed at the baseboard, youll be ok

> all day. I would also want something that would last more than 3
> weeks without reapplying.
>
> My only option is to create a roach motel. Maybe use a boric acid,
> flour, and butter recipe, roll them into a ball and stick it somewhere

boric acid must be dry. they walk thru it.

> dark. Does this work? Won't this stink for a while? I want a bait
> that can attrack roaches from half a mile away. We also have a bit of
> rat problems so this concoction might just be eaten by those critters.
> I guess what I want is a roach-killing recipe that can be molded into
> a solid ball (so the electric fans won't blow it away), and attracts
> roaches but not rats. ;p

SoCalMike
July 21st 03, 02:17 AM
"Human Bean" > wrote in message
m...
> I need to get rid of these roaches. From my internet research,
> there's 2 cost effective method: The first one is using baking soda
> with sugar combo. The second one is boric acid with flour combo.

boric acid sprinkled along the baseboards

> None of them are practical in my case because we have electric fans
> swirling around all day. I wouldn't want to breathe those boric acid

unless you have the fans aimed at the baseboard, youll be ok

> all day. I would also want something that would last more than 3
> weeks without reapplying.
>
> My only option is to create a roach motel. Maybe use a boric acid,
> flour, and butter recipe, roll them into a ball and stick it somewhere

boric acid must be dry. they walk thru it.

> dark. Does this work? Won't this stink for a while? I want a bait
> that can attrack roaches from half a mile away. We also have a bit of
> rat problems so this concoction might just be eaten by those critters.
> I guess what I want is a roach-killing recipe that can be molded into
> a solid ball (so the electric fans won't blow it away), and attracts
> roaches but not rats. ;p

Nicole H
July 21st 03, 09:45 PM
I found this
Hope it helps

She's Bugged
Help, I can't get rid of roaches. I've tried so many chemicals the family
and pets should be dead. I can't afford a monthly fee to have someone come
in all the time. I've emptied every cupboard and have sprayed, powdered and
sealed. Nothing works. They leave during the day but at night are back and
it seems they bring more friends. My walls, baseboards and cupboards are
being ruined by the constant spraying. Is there any help out there? Thanks
JoAnn W.


Try Combat
We have had great success with "Combat". It looks like a small brown disc
that contains one or two holes. Roaches climb in, get the powder on their
feet, and take it back to their nests. The powder kills them.
We used them in Oklahoma, Minnesota, and in Kansas. Within a few weeks, the
roaches were history. BTW, "Combat" comes in two strengths and can be
purchased at Wal-Mart.
Barbara C.


Advice from a Property Manager
I have found through working in the property management business a product
that works great. It is called Terro. They have two products, one for
roaches, and one for ants. It can be purchased in hardware stores, or a
local supercenter. Also, it is very inexpensive.
Cheryl


Homemade Recipe
Since moving to FL our home has been infested with roaches. There is an old
remedy that the Japanese people use
White flour, boric acid, and powdered sugar. Mix equal amounts of boraci
acid and flower, add just enough confectioners sugar to attract the roaches.
Add just enough water to make a soft dough. Roll the dough into little balls
and place in the little candy paper cups (like the cups muffins come in).
Place the balls in corners of cubboards, behind fruniture where other animal
life cannot reach. The roaches eat this and it causes them to dry out. It
takes about two to three weeks before they will be completely gone. Replace
the boric acid balls every month to enusre that there is no reinfestation.
BAC


Prevention
My son brought cockroaches home with him from college years ago. It was
embarrassing to me because, when my mother-in-law would visit, she thought I
must be a lousy housekeeper.
I bought some of those Roach Motels and set them around the kitchen, mostly,
and in my son's room. One thing you should do is be sure that the counters
and sink in your kitchen are completely dry at night; the roaches LOVE
moisture. And never leave food or crumbs anywhere in the open.
If you live in an apartment, as I once did, you may never be rid of them
unless the entire building is sprayed at one time. If one person sprays, the
roaches will just move on to the next-door neighbor.
Another hint: when you bring home your groceries, check rolls of toilet
paper and any other item where they could be hiding.
We finally got rid of ours; hope you do the same!
Doris N.


Bay Leaves
I went to college in Kentucky and for three years, lived in a dorm that was
(at the time) nearly 100 years old. Let your imagination run wild ... after
having years to multiply and grow, we had roaches so large, they could not
squeeze under door frames or baseboards! GROSS! (Having grown up in Colorado
my whole life which has a very dry climate and almost zero bugs of any kind,
I was totally disgusted by all of this).
Anyway - we took bay leaves and crumbled them all along the baseboards; put
whole ones in the window sills; made little "bouquet garni" bags stuffed
with them and left them sitting out on the kitchen counters, scotch-taped
them to the closet walls and doors ... we had bay leaves in one form or
another EVERYWHERE - and the roaches seemed to stay away. (Only the gals on
my floor did this and we didn't have too big a problem with the roaches,
while gals on the other floors *at first* thought it was stupid and they
were completely overrun with them). Roaches are evidently are repulsed by
the smell of bay leaves and it worked wonders. Good luck to the unfortunate
reader - maybe s/he needs to also buy some of those Roach Motels - I have
never used them but hear they work wonders and since the "lure" is
self-contained in the packaging, it would eleminate the need for spayring
caustic chemicals, etc.
D.


Baking Soda and Sugar
We controlled the roach population in our garage with a mixture of baking
soda and powdered sugar. The theory is that the sugar attracts the roaches
and the baking soda mixes with their stomach acids to explode them.
The total solution came when we adopted a couple of feral cats. It sounds
gross but much of their natural diet is roaches and other small insects.
Cynthia


Control In an Apartment
I lived in an apartment building at one time, that had a horrible roach
problem. First, I learned to caulk all cracks and openings around
baseboards, in cupboards, even in the medicine cabinet. Just use standard
caulk and a caulk gun. Look around for any cracks, etc, in the walls,which I
patched with grout, anywhere roaches can be getting in. I then purchased
Raid Max traps, the only traps I found that worked. I put at least two per
room, and changed them when they said on the package. It seems expensive,
but no more expensive than using spray cans. Now, the next thing is to put
your food in airtight containers. Flimsy cardboard boxes are no match for
roaches, and then can smell the food. Put everything in containers or in the
refridgerator. I kept bread and cereals in the refridgerator, and flour,
sugar, rice, etc. in airtight plastic containers. Coffee cans with lids work
well too. I would put a layer of plastic wrap over the can, then put the lid
on, for some extra insurance. Lastly, I never killed any spiders who lived
in my apartment, never. I was told to let them live and they would help keep
the roach population down, and it seemed to help. It also helped me overcome
my fear of spiders, and added benefit *smile*. I was the only apartment in
the complex without roaches, it was hard, and you have to be vigilant about
it, but it is possible to keep them to a minimum.
Lori


Treat the Carpets
I have the answer for the roach problem! It also works on fleas and other
hard-shell type bugs. And, the solution is CHEAP. This may not solve your
problem completely if the roaches are settled into a non-carpeted area, but
if you have them near carpeting, this will work for sure. We actually used
it for a flea problem, but it also worked on the "palmetto bugs," which were
the same as roaches, as far as I could see!
First, vacuum your rugs thoroughly. Then, apply "20 Mule Team Borax" Laundry
Booster to your carpets with a broom. (You'll need about two boxes for every
1200 sq. ft.) Break up any clumps and let it sift down into the carpet.
Leave it there for seven days, and don't walk barefoot on it. (Skin oil will
make it less effective.) After seven days, vacuum again. The Borax dries the
bugs out, as well as their eggs.
Be sure to vacuum and apply the Borax to every square inch of carpet, even
moving furniture, if you have a severe bug problem. We used this tip when we
lived in Orlando, and only had to do this twice in nine month's time. The
tip was given to us by an exterminator, after his fourth or fifth visit to
our apartment.
Shannon

Neil
July 21st 03, 10:24 PM
wrote in message >...
> >
> >"Human Bean" > wrote in message
> m...

(snip)

> >> My only option is to create a roach motel.

See other posts for a few options. Personally, I'd call in a
professional.

(snip)

> "ares" > wrote:

(snip)

> Roaches are attracted to heat.

As I discovered when I worked on a loading dock, for some reason
roaches are also attracted to cardboard boxes. And of course they're
attracted to moisture and food.

>The will be around the coils of a refrigerator,
> in the back of many electrical appliances, in wall switches and sockets,

In electrical gear, roaches can eat insulation and coatings, causing
fire hazards.

(snip)

lala
July 22nd 03, 04:49 PM
I save the tops of milk jugs, wash & dry them off, fill with Boric
Acid and place wherever I've seen a roach. I've found one or two dead
but haven't seen any live ones in weeks now and it was a pretty severe
infestation. It took about 48 hours to work.

The small amount of Boric Acid (I used Borax, actually) isn't going to
cause a fume problem. Good luck...

John Savage
July 24th 03, 03:24 AM
(Neil) writes:
>As I discovered when I worked on a loading dock, for some reason
>roaches are also attracted to cardboard boxes. And of course they're
>attracted to moisture and food.

I have heard it said that they can eat the glue. I guess it must contain
starch, or something digestible.

>>The will be around the coils of a refrigerator,
>> in the back of many electrical appliances, in wall switches and sockets,

A radio/casette-player I picked up from the kerbside was found to be a
source of small roaches. The case was moulded or welded and had recesses
which I couldn't vacuum out but I really wanted to keep the player because
it worked well and looked smart. So I sealed it in a plastic bag, with a
squirt of fly spray (not onto the electronics) and left it to sit in the
sun for a few hours while making sure it didn't get too hot to warp or
harm the gear. Naturally, the roaches didn't survive this. I half expected
that eggs would hatch and I'd have to repeat the treatment a week or two
later but that was the end of the whole problem.
--
John Savage (news reply email invalid; keep news replies in newsgroup)

Neil
July 25th 03, 04:21 AM
John Savage > wrote in message >...
> (Neil) writes:
> >As I discovered when I worked on a loading dock, for some reason
> >roaches are also attracted to cardboard boxes. And of course they're
> >attracted to moisture and food.
>
> I have heard it said that they can eat the glue. I guess it must contain
> starch, or something digestible.

We kept extra boxes in a dark corner of a rarely-used storage room. I
really dreaded going back there.

BTW, these were boxes that had contained books, clothes, and school
supplies. Awhile back, an MCFL poster described having a roach problem
with books kept in old banana boxes. I can only imagine how bad a
roach problem would be with a box that had held sweet fruit like
bananas. I suggested he get rid the boxes and use sealed containers. I
use sealed plastic boxes myself.

A local natural-history museum has Madagascar hissing cockroaches you
can handle. I ask the folks there what they feed the cockroaches, and
they said dry cat food. So if anyone reading this has cats, make sure
to keep the dry food in a sealed container.

> >>The will be around the coils of a refrigerator,
> >> in the back of many electrical appliances, in wall switches and sockets,
>
> A radio/casette-player I picked up from the kerbside was found to be a
> source of small roaches. The case was moulded or welded and had recesses
> which I couldn't vacuum out but I really wanted to keep the player because
> it worked well and looked smart. So I sealed it in a plastic bag, with a
> squirt of fly spray (not onto the electronics) and left it to sit in the
> sun for a few hours while making sure it didn't get too hot to warp or
> harm the gear. Naturally, the roaches didn't survive this. I half expected
> that eggs would hatch and I'd have to repeat the treatment a week or two
> later but that was the end of the whole problem.

I had a similar problem also. I really didn't want to open up the item
and have to deal with what might be lurking inside, so I put the gear
(and some other things from the same room that I figured might have
similar problems) into a shed and set off a bug bomb (not the spray
kind, but the kind that emits out a poisonous gas). That was the end
of my problem.

I used to bug bomb the whole house a few times a year, but now I have
a contract with a professional exterminator who also provides
insurance against termite damage.

I still see a bug or two occasionally, but in my hot, humid climate
that's inevitable.

Google