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View Full Version : Re: Merchants who ask for ID on credit card purchases


Jonathan Kamens
June 19th 09, 06:26 AM
" > writes:
>I don't see how the credit card companies can even begin to enforce
>this rule since so many places ask for ID (and will refuse to accept
>the card if the customer refuses to produce ID).

I pay by credit card at every possible opportunity, several
times per week. My memory isn't what it used to be, but I can
only remember being asked to show ID once for as far back as I
can remember, so I really don't understand what you're talking
about when you keep referring to the "so many places" that ask
for ID. Perhaps you patronize different kinds of
establishments than I.

That one time, incidentally, was CVS, which for a time had a
policy of asking for ID for any credit-card transaction over
$50. Now, the CVS at which this occurred is less than a block
from my house, I shop there several times a week, and the
clerk who was ringing me up knows me by sight and has chatted
with me on many occasions. So it was particularly absurd that
I was asked to produce ID.

I refused. The clerk called over the manager, and I explained
that I was a regular at the store and they both knew it, I
thought it was stupid, offensive, and a waste of time that I
was being asked ofr ID, and both he and I knew full well that
his merchant agreement required him to accept my card
regardless of whether I produced ID. He told the clerk to
complete the transaction.

I believe CVS has since stopped asking for ID for purchases
over $50. Good for them.

Jonathan Kamens
June 19th 09, 04:26 PM
Scott in SoCal > writes:
>Where do you live?

Boston.

>In SoCal *every* store asks for ID with a credit card.

Why? What's different there?

Is it just a cultural thing, i.e., it became the norm so now
everybody does it, or is there something different there that
makes it necessary and appropriate?

If it's so widespread, and if the credit-card companies don't
want it happening, then why don't they put a stop to it?

I mean, if it happens everywhere, then couldn't Visa or
MasterCard simply send someone to make a pass through all the
stores, make credit-card purchases, get carded, and then send
cease and desist letters to all the violators telling them if
they don't stop it their merchant accounts will be pulled?

Surely if given a choice between not carding and no longer
being able to accept credit cards, most merchants would choose
the former, since it would be a significant competitive
disadvantage for them to be unable to take plastic.

Rod Speed[_1_]
June 19th 09, 07:32 PM
Jonathan Kamens wrote
> Scott in SoCal > writes

>> Where do you live?

> Boston.

>> In SoCal *every* store asks for ID with a credit card.

> Why? What's different there?

> Is it just a cultural thing, i.e., it became the norm so
> now everybody does it, or is there something different
> there that makes it necessary and appropriate?

> If it's so widespread, and if the credit-card companies don't
> want it happening, then why don't they put a stop to it?

> I mean, if it happens everywhere, then couldn't Visa or
> MasterCard simply send someone to make a pass through all the
> stores, make credit-card purchases, get carded, and then send
> cease and desist letters to all the violators telling them if
> they don't stop it their merchant accounts will be pulled?

Yes, they couldnt but the dont bother. They dont even bother
when one of the holders of one of their cards whines about it.

> Surely if given a choice between not carding and
> no longer being able to accept credit cards,

None of the card companys is silly enough
to go that route, particularly with the majors.

> most merchants would choose the former, since it would be a significant
> competitive disadvantage for them to be unable to take plastic.

Yes, but the card companys arent silly enough to go that route.

Its easier for them to just bluff the most stupid merchants
by having that in their alleged 'merchant agreement' which
is in fact nothing of the sort, and do nothing about the
merchants who realise its pure bluff and legaly unenforceable.

And VASTLY cheaper to do it that way, which is why they do it that way.

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