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View Full Version : Walmart drug containers NOT recyclable!!


June 29th 09, 09:44 PM
Walmart has started dispensing drugs in a blue #6
plastic sleeve

Unfortunately the damn thing cant be recycled!!

WTF!! Why package millions of drugs in a container
that is going to wind up in landfills?

The Real Bev[_7_]
June 30th 09, 12:15 AM
wrote:

> Walmart has started dispensing drugs in a blue #6
> plastic sleeve
>
> Unfortunately the damn thing cant be recycled!!
>
> WTF!! Why package millions of drugs in a container
> that is going to wind up in landfills?

Put it in the recycling bin anyway, it probably won't make any difference and
maybe if enough of them get tossed in the bin somebody will figure out how to
recycle them..

I've never heard exactly how much of our "recycled" stuff actually gets
recycled and how much ends up in the landfills anyway. Around here we toss
everything -- paper, metal, glass, plastic -- into the same container and pay
some company to take it away. I can't believe that it's profitable for them to
actually separate out the various kinds of loose paper, etc. into salable product.

--
Cheers, Bev
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
If he had any brains, he'd take them out and play with them.

June 30th 09, 01:25 AM
The Real Bev > wrote:

>Put it in the recycling bin anyway, it probably won't make any difference and
>maybe if enough of them get tossed in the bin somebody will figure out how to
>recycle them..

Not true!

Only 1 and 2 get recycled

The Real Bev[_7_]
June 30th 09, 03:01 AM
wrote:

> The Real Bev > wrote:
>
>>Put it in the recycling bin anyway, it probably won't make any difference and
>>maybe if enough of them get tossed in the bin somebody will figure out how to
>>recycle them..
>
> Not true!
>
> Only 1 and 2 get recycled

1 in 2 WHAT?

--
Cheers, Bev
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
If he had any brains, he'd take them out and play with them.

Dave Garland
June 30th 09, 03:15 AM
The Real Bev wrote:

> I've never heard exactly how much of our "recycled" stuff actually gets
> recycled and how much ends up in the landfills anyway. Around here we
> toss everything -- paper, metal, glass, plastic -- into the same
> container and pay some company to take it away. I can't believe that
> it's profitable for them to actually separate out the various kinds of
> loose paper, etc. into salable product.

It very much depends on where you are, how it is handled, and what the
market is.

In Minneapolis, we separate glass, metal, plastic, paper, newsprint,
cardboard, batteries. The pickup trucks have large trailers with
bins for the various things. After paying the costs of pickup and
handling, the city actually makes a small profit (as opposed to the
rest of the garbage, which costs the city a bunch to get rid of).

Obviously, the more mixed the materials are, the less profitable it is.

Dave

The Real Bev[_7_]
June 30th 09, 03:26 AM
Dave Garland wrote:

> The Real Bev wrote:
>
>> I've never heard exactly how much of our "recycled" stuff actually gets
>> recycled and how much ends up in the landfills anyway. Around here we
>> toss everything -- paper, metal, glass, plastic -- into the same
>> container and pay some company to take it away. I can't believe that
>> it's profitable for them to actually separate out the various kinds of
>> loose paper, etc. into salable product.
>
> It very much depends on where you are, how it is handled, and what the
> market is.
>
> In Minneapolis, we separate glass, metal, plastic, paper, newsprint,
> cardboard, batteries. The pickup trucks have large trailers with
> bins for the various things.

Pasadena started out that way and then switched to a single container. My
mom's city put trash and recyclables in the same container. The theory is that
using only one truck to pick up everything saved money/resources/whatever.

> After paying the costs of pickup and
> handling, the city actually makes a small profit (as opposed to the
> rest of the garbage, which costs the city a bunch to get rid of).

When we started recycling they raised the rates. Later on they raised the
rates on trash, but the smallest container (30 gallons) is overkill unless I do
serious yardwork. There is no charge for recycling or yard waste containers,
and you can have as many as you like.

> Obviously, the more mixed the materials are, the less profitable it is.

I think the recycling company makes its money with the fees it charges cities,
who ultimately charge the citizens. Cynical? Moi?

--
Cheers, Bev
I love the way Microsoft follows standards. In much the
same manner that fish follow migrating caribou.
-- Paul Tomblin

Don Klipstein
June 30th 09, 04:11 AM
In article >, The Real Bev wrote:
wrote:
>
>> The Real Bev > wrote:
>>
>>>Put it in the recycling bin anyway, it probably won't make any difference and
>>>maybe if enough of them get tossed in the bin somebody will figure out how to
>>>recycle them..
>>
>> Not true!
>>
>> Only 1 and 2 get recycled
>
>1 in 2 WHAT?

I think is referring to plastic objects having recycling
symbols (triangles made with three bent arrows) that have the numerals 1
or 2 in them. 1 is polyethylene terephthalate, and 2 is high density
polyethylene. Many recycling facilities that take plastics for recycling
only take 1 and 2, sometimes even only if they are plastic food and
beverage containers.
Plastic grocery bags may even be incompatible with other plastics of
same recycling symbol, due to often having photodegration-enabling
additives. Nowadays, many supermarkets are accepting plastic bags for
recycling.

There are other recycling symbol numbers for other plastics, such as
polystyrene (6), polypropylene (5), and low density polyethylene (I forget
whether that is 3 or 4).

- Don Klipstein )

The Real Bev[_7_]
June 30th 09, 04:38 AM
Don Klipstein wrote:

> In article >, The Real Bev wrote:
wrote:
>>
>>> The Real Bev > wrote:
>>>
>>>>Put it in the recycling bin anyway, it probably won't make any difference and
>>>>maybe if enough of them get tossed in the bin somebody will figure out how to
>>>>recycle them..
>>>
>>> Not true!
>>>
>>> Only 1 and 2 get recycled
>>
>>1 in 2 WHAT?
>
> I think is referring to plastic objects having recycling
> symbols (triangles made with three bent arrows) that have the numerals 1
> or 2 in them. 1 is polyethylene terephthalate, and 2 is high density
> polyethylene. Many recycling facilities that take plastics for recycling
> only take 1 and 2, sometimes even only if they are plastic food and
> beverage containers.
> Plastic grocery bags may even be incompatible with other plastics of
> same recycling symbol, due to often having photodegration-enabling
> additives. Nowadays, many supermarkets are accepting plastic bags for
> recycling.
>
> There are other recycling symbol numbers for other plastics, such as
> polystyrene (6), polypropylene (5), and low density polyethylene (I forget
> whether that is 3 or 4).

Ours takes everything, so we don't have to care. We pay for the privilege, of
course... Lots of people put soda cans and bottles in the recycling container
rather than return them for the deposit -- I suspect this may be the only
profitable commodity the recycling companies collect.

--
Cheers, Bev
================================================== =======
"Life is actually fair. It just doesn't seem to be common
knowledge that 'fair' sometimes sucks." -- Jim Cook

Dave Garland
June 30th 09, 06:51 AM
The Real Bev wrote:
> Dave Garland wrote:
>> After paying the costs of pickup and
>> handling, the city actually makes a small profit (as opposed to the
>> rest of the garbage, which costs the city a bunch to get rid of).
>
> When we started recycling they raised the rates. Later on they raised
> the rates on trash, but the smallest container (30 gallons) is overkill
> unless I do serious yardwork. There is no charge for recycling or yard
> waste containers, and you can have as many as you like.

I think they raised the rates here, too, but it was 20 years ago and I
don't remember. But if we recycle, we get $7 off of the "regular"
monthly price. (I suppose someone could game it by putting out one
can each recycle day, but that would be almost more work than doing it
right.) Cutting down on the amount of garbage saves the county money,
in addition to the money they make on the recycling.

No yardwaste containers here, we bundle or bag it. Actually, since
the recycling containers aren't big enough, we mostly do that with
recycle too.

Dave

Dave Garland
June 30th 09, 07:06 AM
The Real Bev wrote:

> Lots of people put soda cans and bottles in the
> recycling container rather than return them for the deposit -- I suspect
> this may be the only profitable commodity the recycling companies collect.

You're probably getting ripped off, then. Or maybe it's because you
don't separate at the source. We don't have deposit containers in MN,
but our (city-run) recycler still turns a profit.

Because of that, we may get a lot more aluminum than your system does,
though. That's got to be the single most profitable item (the current
wholesale price for scrap beverage aluminum is about a cent and a half
per can, at the mill).

Dave

Evelyn Leeper
June 30th 09, 03:13 PM
Dave Garland wrote:
> The Real Bev wrote:
>
>> Lots of people put soda cans and bottles in the
>> recycling container rather than return them for the deposit -- I suspect
>> this may be the only profitable commodity the recycling companies collect.
>
> You're probably getting ripped off, then. Or maybe it's because you
> don't separate at the source. We don't have deposit containers in MN,
> but our (city-run) recycler still turns a profit.
>
> Because of that, we may get a lot more aluminum than your system does,
> though. That's got to be the single most profitable item (the current
> wholesale price for scrap beverage aluminum is about a cent and a half
> per can, at the mill).

A friend who town has "large-item" pickup days says that frequently, the
night before the pick-up someone comes around and take all the aluminum
grill covers, etc. (This is, by the way, illegal, since the proceeds
from this is how the town pays for the pick-up.)


--
Evelyn C. Leeper
Never let your sense of morals prevent you from doing
what is right. -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

Evelyn Leeper
June 30th 09, 03:20 PM
Dave Garland wrote:
> The Real Bev wrote:
>> Dave Garland wrote:
>>> After paying the costs of pickup and
>>> handling, the city actually makes a small profit (as opposed to the
>>> rest of the garbage, which costs the city a bunch to get rid of).
>> When we started recycling they raised the rates. Later on they raised
>> the rates on trash, but the smallest container (30 gallons) is overkill
>> unless I do serious yardwork. There is no charge for recycling or yard
>> waste containers, and you can have as many as you like.
>
> I think they raised the rates here, too, but it was 20 years ago and I
> don't remember. But if we recycle, we get $7 off of the "regular"
> monthly price.

Here, trash collection is by private contractor rather than the
government. I suppose recycling gets some people a break, as the trash
collector charges more if you have more than fits in the (large) rolling
vertical bin they provide. (The recycling is governmental, and free.)
Trash collection is done semi-weekly, but we generate so little that we
tend to put the bin out once every three weeks. On the other hand, some
folks have theirs full to over-flowing. (On occasion, I will take one
of our neighbor's excess bags and put it in our bin to save them money.)

--
Evelyn C. Leeper
Never let your sense of morals prevent you from doing
what is right. -Salvor Hardin, "Foundation"

George[_1_]
June 30th 09, 04:32 PM
The Real Bev wrote:
> Dave Garland wrote:
>
>> The Real Bev wrote:
>>
>>> I've never heard exactly how much of our "recycled" stuff actually gets
>>> recycled and how much ends up in the landfills anyway. Around here we
>>> toss everything -- paper, metal, glass, plastic -- into the same
>>> container and pay some company to take it away. I can't believe that
>>> it's profitable for them to actually separate out the various kinds of
>>> loose paper, etc. into salable product.
>>
>> It very much depends on where you are, how it is handled, and what the
>> market is.
>>
>> In Minneapolis, we separate glass, metal, plastic, paper, newsprint,
>> cardboard, batteries. The pickup trucks have large trailers with
>> bins for the various things.
>
> Pasadena started out that way and then switched to a single container.
> My mom's city put trash and recyclables in the same container. The
> theory is that using only one truck to pick up everything saved
> money/resources/whatever.
>
>> After paying the costs of pickup and
>> handling, the city actually makes a small profit (as opposed to the
>> rest of the garbage, which costs the city a bunch to get rid of).
>
> When we started recycling they raised the rates. Later on they raised
> the rates on trash, but the smallest container (30 gallons) is overkill
> unless I do serious yardwork. There is no charge for recycling or yard
> waste containers, and you can have as many as you like.
>
>> Obviously, the more mixed the materials are, the less profitable it is.
>
> I think the recycling company makes its money with the fees it charges
> cities, who ultimately charge the citizens. Cynical? Moi?
>

Not in my area. The adjoining county and ours built and operate a
recycling center. It actually turns a slight profit every year. The
local municipalities either collect or station a truck at a central
location.

The biggest single problem is folks who have an attitude and
intentionally can't read. They include garbage or items that can't be
accepted etc because "someone else can deal with it". So that load gets
refused and then we have to pay a tipping fee at the landfill.

The Real Bev[_7_]
June 30th 09, 05:57 PM
Dave Garland wrote:

> The Real Bev wrote:
>> Dave Garland wrote:
>>> After paying the costs of pickup and
>>> handling, the city actually makes a small profit (as opposed to the
>>> rest of the garbage, which costs the city a bunch to get rid of).
>>
>> When we started recycling they raised the rates. Later on they raised
>> the rates on trash, but the smallest container (30 gallons) is overkill
>> unless I do serious yardwork. There is no charge for recycling or yard
>> waste containers, and you can have as many as you like.
>
> I think they raised the rates here, too, but it was 20 years ago and I
> don't remember. But if we recycle, we get $7 off of the "regular"
> monthly price. (I suppose someone could game it by putting out one
> can each recycle day, but that would be almost more work than doing it
> right.) Cutting down on the amount of garbage saves the county money,
> in addition to the money they make on the recycling.
>
> No yardwaste containers here, we bundle or bag it. Actually, since
> the recycling containers aren't big enough, we mostly do that with
> recycle too.

We have machine-dumpable containers here, so that all you need is one
garbageman/truck per route. There used to be one truck+driver and a host of
guys with converted motorcycles going into people's back yards, dumping the
trash into their trucklets and then emptying the trucklets into the big truck.
Then they had the separate recycling trucks with the separate bins. Then
they converted -- at increased expense -- to the current system.

I liked the garbagemen. If you were nice and gave them sodas and helped them
load, they would take FAR more trash than we're allowed now. It takes me weeks
to get rid of the annual tree-trimming detritus.

--
Cheers, Bev
-------------------------------------------------------------------
"There is nothing wrong with it and I didn't do it and, my gosh,
well I guess I just remembered I did...sort of...but it wasn't my
fault...because my staff didn't tell me...and I was very busy
meditating on the issues and besides I thought I was in Cleveland."
-- Meg Greenfield

The Real Bev[_7_]
June 30th 09, 06:02 PM
Evelyn Leeper wrote:

> Dave Garland wrote:
>> The Real Bev wrote:
>>
>>> Lots of people put soda cans and bottles in the
>>> recycling container rather than return them for the deposit -- I suspect
>>> this may be the only profitable commodity the recycling companies collect.
>>
>> You're probably getting ripped off, then. Or maybe it's because you
>> don't separate at the source. We don't have deposit containers in MN,
>> but our (city-run) recycler still turns a profit.
>>
>> Because of that, we may get a lot more aluminum than your system does,
>> though. That's got to be the single most profitable item (the current
>> wholesale price for scrap beverage aluminum is about a cent and a half
>> per can, at the mill).

The deposit is a nickel a can and a dime (or 8 cents?) for 2-liter plastic soda
bottles, less for smaller ones. More than scrap value. Every once in a while
I take a pickupful of cans to the recycling hut. Last time I had $125 worth.
It will probably be more this time because the price has nearly doubled since then.

> A friend who town has "large-item" pickup days says that frequently, the
> night before the pick-up someone comes around and take all the aluminum
> grill covers, etc. (This is, by the way, illegal, since the proceeds
> from this is how the town pays for the pick-up.)

We used to have that, but now you can have two big-trash pickups per year. You
have to call first and tell them what you'll be getting rid of. Last time I
did it humans (not the city) picked up some of the stuff, and during the night
somebody left a ratty chest of drawers.

--
Cheers, Bev
-------------------------------------------------------------------
"There is nothing wrong with it and I didn't do it and, my gosh,
well I guess I just remembered I did...sort of...but it wasn't my
fault...because my staff didn't tell me...and I was very busy
meditating on the issues and besides I thought I was in Cleveland."
-- Meg Greenfield

jeff
June 30th 09, 09:39 PM
The Real Bev wrote:
> Dave Garland wrote:
>
>> The Real Bev wrote:
>>> Dave Garland wrote:
>>>> After paying the costs of pickup and
>>>> handling, the city actually makes a small profit (as opposed to the
>>>> rest of the garbage, which costs the city a bunch to get rid of).
>>>
>>> When we started recycling they raised the rates. Later on they raised
>>> the rates on trash, but the smallest container (30 gallons) is overkill
>>> unless I do serious yardwork. There is no charge for recycling or yard
>>> waste containers, and you can have as many as you like.
>>
>> I think they raised the rates here, too, but it was 20 years ago and I
>> don't remember. But if we recycle, we get $7 off of the "regular"
>> monthly price. (I suppose someone could game it by putting out one
>> can each recycle day, but that would be almost more work than doing it
>> right.) Cutting down on the amount of garbage saves the county money,
>> in addition to the money they make on the recycling.
>>
>> No yardwaste containers here, we bundle or bag it. Actually, since
>> the recycling containers aren't big enough, we mostly do that with
>> recycle too.
>
> We have machine-dumpable containers here, so that all you need is one
> garbageman/truck per route. There used to be one truck+driver and a
> host of guys with converted motorcycles going into people's back yards,
> dumping the trash into their trucklets and then emptying the trucklets
> into the big truck. Then they had the separate recycling trucks with
> the separate bins. Then they converted -- at increased expense -- to
> the current system.
>
> I liked the garbagemen. If you were nice and gave them sodas and helped
> them load, they would take FAR more trash than we're allowed now.

I used to put a couple cold beers on the Herby Curby on a hot day and
the service was great. Investigative reporting cracked down on them
drinking during lunch and now service sucks.

Recycling is not sorted here and is every other week.

Yard waste is separate, not sure when that is picked up, but it is a
special run.

Jeff


It
> takes me weeks to get rid of the annual tree-trimming detritus.
>

The Real Bev[_7_]
June 30th 09, 11:15 PM
jeff wrote:

> The Real Bev wrote:
>> Dave Garland wrote:
>>> The Real Bev wrote:
>>>> Dave Garland wrote:
>>>>> After paying the costs of pickup and
>>>>> handling, the city actually makes a small profit (as opposed to the
>>>>> rest of the garbage, which costs the city a bunch to get rid of).
>>>>
>>>> When we started recycling they raised the rates. Later on they raised
>>>> the rates on trash, but the smallest container (30 gallons) is overkill
>>>> unless I do serious yardwork. There is no charge for recycling or yard
>>>> waste containers, and you can have as many as you like.
>>>
>>> I think they raised the rates here, too, but it was 20 years ago and I
>>> don't remember. But if we recycle, we get $7 off of the "regular"
>>> monthly price. (I suppose someone could game it by putting out one
>>> can each recycle day, but that would be almost more work than doing it
>>> right.) Cutting down on the amount of garbage saves the county money,
>>> in addition to the money they make on the recycling.
>>>
>>> No yardwaste containers here, we bundle or bag it. Actually, since
>>> the recycling containers aren't big enough, we mostly do that with
>>> recycle too.
>>
>> We have machine-dumpable containers here, so that all you need is one
>> garbageman/truck per route. There used to be one truck+driver and a
>> host of guys with converted motorcycles going into people's back yards,
>> dumping the trash into their trucklets and then emptying the trucklets
>> into the big truck. Then they had the separate recycling trucks with
>> the separate bins. Then they converted -- at increased expense -- to
>> the current system.
>>
>> I liked the garbagemen. If you were nice and gave them sodas and helped
>> them load, they would take FAR more trash than we're allowed now.
>
> I used to put a couple cold beers on the Herby Curby on a hot day and
> the service was great. Investigative reporting cracked down on them
> drinking during lunch and now service sucks.

I gave them sodas. (a) I don't buy beer ever; and (b) I didn't want to give
guys who are driving an alcoholic beverage, even a mild one, at 9:00 in the
morning.

> Recycling is not sorted here and is every other week.
>
> Yard waste is separate, not sure when that is picked up, but it is a
> special run.

3 different runs -- one for trash, one for recycling and one for yard waste.
The containers have different colored tops. I don't know whether they use the
same trucks or different trucks, but they all come at different times on the
same day once per week. Mostly that's overkill, but I envy people who have two
pickups per week at less cost. I pay $14/month for trash, the minimum price.

--
Cheers, Bev
-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
What if there were no hypothetical questions?

jeff
July 1st 09, 05:34 AM
The Real Bev wrote:
> jeff wrote:
>
>> The Real Bev wrote:
>>> Dave Garland wrote:
>>>> The Real Bev wrote:
>>>>> Dave Garland wrote:
>>>>>> After paying the costs of pickup and
>>>>>> handling, the city actually makes a small profit (as opposed to the
>>>>>> rest of the garbage, which costs the city a bunch to get rid of).
>>>>>
>>>>> When we started recycling they raised the rates. Later on they raised
>>>>> the rates on trash, but the smallest container (30 gallons) is
>>>>> overkill
>>>>> unless I do serious yardwork. There is no charge for recycling or
>>>>> yard
>>>>> waste containers, and you can have as many as you like.
>>>>
>>>> I think they raised the rates here, too, but it was 20 years ago and I
>>>> don't remember. But if we recycle, we get $7 off of the "regular"
>>>> monthly price. (I suppose someone could game it by putting out one
>>>> can each recycle day, but that would be almost more work than doing it
>>>> right.) Cutting down on the amount of garbage saves the county money,
>>>> in addition to the money they make on the recycling.
>>>>
>>>> No yardwaste containers here, we bundle or bag it. Actually, since
>>>> the recycling containers aren't big enough, we mostly do that with
>>>> recycle too.
>>>
>>> We have machine-dumpable containers here, so that all you need is one
>>> garbageman/truck per route. There used to be one truck+driver and a
>>> host of guys with converted motorcycles going into people's back
>>> yards, dumping the trash into their trucklets and then emptying the
>>> trucklets into the big truck. Then they had the separate recycling
>>> trucks with the separate bins. Then they converted -- at increased
>>> expense -- to the current system.
>>>
>>> I liked the garbagemen. If you were nice and gave them sodas and
>>> helped them load, they would take FAR more trash than we're allowed now.
>>
>> I used to put a couple cold beers on the Herby Curby on a hot day
>> and the service was great. Investigative reporting cracked down on
>> them drinking during lunch and now service sucks.
>
> I gave them sodas. (a) I don't buy beer ever; and (b) I didn't want to
> give guys who are driving an alcoholic beverage, even a mild one, at
> 9:00 in the morning.

The beers never made it up to the driver! But soda is still good on a
hot day.

>
>> Recycling is not sorted here and is every other week.
>>
>> Yard waste is separate, not sure when that is picked up, but it is
>> a special run.
>
> 3 different runs -- one for trash, one for recycling and one for yard
> waste. The containers have different colored tops. I don't know whether
> they use the same trucks or different trucks, but they all come at
> different times on the same day once per week. Mostly that's overkill,
> but I envy people who have two pickups per week at less cost. I pay
> $14/month for trash, the minimum price.

I'm at either $289/year (I think), I think everyone pays the same
amount. They call it a Solid Waste Bill. Several years ago they changed
the way they billed property taxes (this was bundled in) and "forgot" to
bill for the solid waste. Then everyone got an overdue notice for 3
years service! The mayor at the time subsequently served a stretch in
the Big House.

The highest points in the city are the trash dumps, you can see them
for miles.

Jeff
>

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