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View Full Version : Re: PagePlus Rocks the Mobile World--Unlimited Texts, Unlimited Voice Minutes,20MB of Data <$34/month on Verizon's Network


Todd Allcock[_2_]
August 12th 09, 06:39 PM
At 12 Aug 2009 01:36:18 +0000 Larry wrote:
> wrote in :
>
> > How would that impact things?
> >
> >
>
> That's fairly obvious. You'd be paying big roaming charges in Hannibal.
>
> Did Hannibal have Alltel coverage? It should add to the Verizon
coverage
> shortly.


Roaming on PagePlus is $0.59/minute. While high, it beats the
alternative of no roaming at all, which is the solution most prepaid
operators choose!

SMS
August 15th 09, 04:37 PM
Todd Allcock wrote:
> At 12 Aug 2009 01:36:18 +0000 Larry wrote:
>> wrote in :
>>
>>> How would that impact things?
>>>
>>>
>> That's fairly obvious. You'd be paying big roaming charges in Hannibal.
>>
>> Did Hannibal have Alltel coverage? It should add to the Verizon
> coverage
>> shortly.
>
>
> Roaming on PagePlus is $0.59/minute. While high, it beats the
> alternative of no roaming at all, which is the solution most prepaid
> operators choose!

I wouldn't say "most." Virgin and Boost CDMA doen't allow roaming, Boost
iDEN has nothing to roam onto.

American Roaming Network, PagePlus, T-Mobile, 7-11 Speak Out, Tracfone,
Net10, Jitterbug, InPulse, AT&T, and Only1 Mobile (may be out of
business) all allow roaming either included or at extra cost.

tlvp
August 21st 09, 09:57 AM
On Sat, 15 Aug 2009 10:37:10 -0400, SMS > wrote:

> Todd Allcock wrote:
>> At 12 Aug 2009 01:36:18 +0000 Larry wrote:
>>> wrote in :
>>>
>>>> How would that impact things?
>>>>
>>>>
>>> That's fairly obvious. You'd be paying big roaming charges in Hannibal.
>>>
>>> Did Hannibal have Alltel coverage? It should add to the Verizon
>> coverage
>>> shortly.
>>
>>
>> Roaming on PagePlus is $0.59/minute. While high, it beats the
>> alternative of no roaming at all, which is the solution most prepaid
>> operators choose!
>
> I wouldn't say "most." Virgin and Boost CDMA doen't allow roaming, Boost
> iDEN has nothing to roam onto.
>
> American Roaming Network, PagePlus, T-Mobile, 7-11 Speak Out, Tracfone,
> Net10, Jitterbug, InPulse, AT&T, and Only1 Mobile (may be out of
> business) all allow roaming either included or at extra cost.

I can't speak for the other carriers, but our T-Mobile handsets,
while away in the glorious SouthWest for a couple of weeks recently,
several times found themselves in GSM territory served only by
Cingular/AT&T_Wireless, and were unable to register as roamers.

Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme (or
lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the part of T-Mo,
for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe, China, or most of
the rest of GSM Asia.

Cheers, -- tlvp



--
Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP

Steve Sobol
August 21st 09, 04:39 PM
In article >,
says...


> Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme (or
> lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the part of T-Mo,
> for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe, China, or most of


Is your phone a multi-band phone, or does it run only on 1900MHz? Most
of AT&T is 800 (850) MHz.

Having said that, our phones see AT&T's towers but I can't register on
those towers... but that's here, and T-Mo has a network here.



--
Steve Sobol, Victorville, California, USA

SMS
August 21st 09, 07:18 PM
Steve Sobol wrote:
> In article >,
> says...
>
>
>> Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme (or
>> lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the part of T-Mo,
>> for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe, China, or most of
>
>
> Is your phone a multi-band phone, or does it run only on 1900MHz? Most
> of AT&T is 800 (850) MHz.

It'd have to be a pretty old T-Mobile (or Voicestream) phone to be 1900
MHz only. Or one of those crippled tri-band phones that are
900/1800/1900 that were sold a while back.

Todd Allcock[_2_]
August 21st 09, 07:34 PM
"tlvp" > wrote...

>>>>> How would that impact things?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> That's fairly obvious. You'd be paying big roaming charges in
>>>> Hannibal.
>>>>
>>>> Did Hannibal have Alltel coverage? It should add to the Verizon
>>>> coverage shortly.
>>>
>>>
>>> Roaming on PagePlus is $0.59/minute. While high, it beats the
>>> alternative of no roaming at all, which is the solution most prepaid
>>> operators choose!
>>
>> I wouldn't say "most." Virgin and Boost CDMA doen't allow roaming, Boost
>> iDEN has nothing to roam onto.
>>
>> American Roaming Network, PagePlus, T-Mobile, 7-11 Speak Out, Tracfone,
>> Net10, Jitterbug, InPulse, AT&T, and Only1 Mobile (may be out of
>> business) all allow roaming either included or at extra cost.
>
> I can't speak for the other carriers, but our T-Mobile handsets,
> while away in the glorious SouthWest for a couple of weeks recently,
> several times found themselves in GSM territory served only by
> Cingular/AT&T_Wireless, and were unable to register as roamers.
>
> Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme (or
> lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the part of T-Mo,
> for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe, China, or most of
> the rest of GSM Asia.


It's simply a lack of roaming agreements. I was just in Arizona and New
Mexico last week and did a lot of roaming on Alltel and a New Mexico
regional carrier called Plateau Wireless. Do your phones support 850MHz? I
think the Alltel coverage is on 850 (but I could be wrong.)

Todd Allcock[_2_]
August 21st 09, 07:40 PM
"SMS" > wrote in message
...
> Steve Sobol wrote:
>> In article >,
>> says...
>>
>>
>>> Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme (or
>>> lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the part of T-Mo,
>>> for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe, China, or most of
>>
>>
>> Is your phone a multi-band phone, or does it run only on 1900MHz? Most of
>> AT&T is 800 (850) MHz.
>
> It'd have to be a pretty old T-Mobile (or Voicestream) phone to be 1900
> MHz only. Or one of those crippled tri-band phones that are 900/1800/1900
> that were sold a while back.

Or, it could be a perfectly nice modern phone designed for the European
market. I had my eye on a few European market Toshiba and Samsung
smartphones (I'm a Windows Mobile snob, but don't much care for HTC
products) about a year ago that surprisingly lacked 850, so I passed.

jj
August 21st 09, 08:15 PM
Todd Allcock wrote:
> "SMS" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Steve Sobol wrote:
>>> In article >,
>>> says...
>>>
>>>
>>>> Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme
>>>> (or lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the part
>>>> of T-Mo, for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe, China,
>>>> or most of
>>>
>>>
>>> Is your phone a multi-band phone, or does it run only on 1900MHz?
>>> Most of AT&T is 800 (850) MHz.
>>
>> It'd have to be a pretty old T-Mobile (or Voicestream) phone to be
>> 1900 MHz only. Or one of those crippled tri-band phones that are
>> 900/1800/1900 that were sold a while back.
>
> Or, it could be a perfectly nice modern phone designed for the
> European market. I had my eye on a few European market Toshiba and
> Samsung smartphones (I'm a Windows Mobile snob, but don't much care
> for HTC products) about a year ago that surprisingly lacked 850, so I passed.

What don't you like about HTC products ?

Todd Allcock[_2_]
August 21st 09, 08:27 PM
"jj" > wrote in message
...
> Todd Allcock wrote:
>> "SMS" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Steve Sobol wrote:
>>>> In article >,
>>>> says...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme
>>>>> (or lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the part
>>>>> of T-Mo, for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe, China,
>>>>> or most of
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Is your phone a multi-band phone, or does it run only on 1900MHz?
>>>> Most of AT&T is 800 (850) MHz.
>>>
>>> It'd have to be a pretty old T-Mobile (or Voicestream) phone to be
>>> 1900 MHz only. Or one of those crippled tri-band phones that are
>>> 900/1800/1900 that were sold a while back.
>>
>> Or, it could be a perfectly nice modern phone designed for the
>> European market. I had my eye on a few European market Toshiba and
>> Samsung smartphones (I'm a Windows Mobile snob, but don't much care
>> for HTC products) about a year ago that surprisingly lacked 850, so I
>> passed.
>
> What don't you like about HTC products ?

Despite making phones the size of bricks and twice as heavy, they can't seem
to squeeze in room for a standard headphone jack. Until the release of the
iPhone lit a fire under their keister, they used slow processors, precious
little memory and storage, and tiny screens. Evry HTC phone I've ever used
needed to replaced at least once (under warranty thankfully) for button or
screen faliures (my AT&T Tilt, my fourth HTC phone, is in the shop now- the
camera stopped autofocusing.)

jj
August 22nd 09, 01:14 AM
Todd Allcock wrote:
> "jj" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Todd Allcock wrote:
>>> "SMS" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> Steve Sobol wrote:
>>>>> In article >,
>>>>> says...
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme
>>>>>> (or lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the
>>>>>> part of T-Mo, for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe,
>>>>>> China, or most of
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Is your phone a multi-band phone, or does it run only on 1900MHz?
>>>>> Most of AT&T is 800 (850) MHz.
>>>>
>>>> It'd have to be a pretty old T-Mobile (or Voicestream) phone to be
>>>> 1900 MHz only. Or one of those crippled tri-band phones that are
>>>> 900/1800/1900 that were sold a while back.
>>>
>>> Or, it could be a perfectly nice modern phone designed for the
>>> European market. I had my eye on a few European market Toshiba and
>>> Samsung smartphones (I'm a Windows Mobile snob, but don't much care
>>> for HTC products) about a year ago that surprisingly lacked 850, so
>>> I passed.
>>
>> What don't you like about HTC products ?
>
> Despite making phones the size of bricks and twice as heavy, they
> can't seem to squeeze in room for a standard headphone jack. Until
> the release of the iPhone lit a fire under their keister, they used
> slow processors, precious little memory and storage, and tiny
> screens. Evry HTC phone I've ever used needed to replaced at least
> once (under warranty thankfully) for button or screen faliures (my
> AT&T Tilt, my fourth HTC phone, is in the shop now- the camera
> stopped autofocusing.)

Thanks for that. Never tried one myself, I stick with Nokias.

Todd Allcock
August 22nd 09, 01:49 AM
At 22 Aug 2009 09:14:50 +1000 jj wrote:

> >> What don't you like about HTC products ?
> >
> > Despite making phones the size of bricks and twice as heavy, they
> > can't seem to squeeze in room for a standard headphone jack. Until
> > the release of the iPhone lit a fire under their keister, they used
> > slow processors, precious little memory and storage, and tiny
> > screens. Evry HTC phone I've ever used needed to replaced at least
> > once (under warranty thankfully) for button or screen faliures (my
> > AT&T Tilt, my fourth HTC phone, is in the shop now- the camera
> > stopped autofocusing.)
>
> Thanks for that. Never tried one myself, I stick with Nokias.

As did I for about 15 years. I still think they make the best phones. I
like Windows Mobile-based touchscreen phones, though, and Nokia, as owners
of the competing Symbian OS, doesn't do WinMo. God I wish they did, though!

jj
August 22nd 09, 02:15 AM
Todd Allcock wrote:
> At 22 Aug 2009 09:14:50 +1000 jj wrote:
>
>>>> What don't you like about HTC products ?
>>>
>>> Despite making phones the size of bricks and twice as heavy, they
>>> can't seem to squeeze in room for a standard headphone jack. Until
>>> the release of the iPhone lit a fire under their keister, they used
>>> slow processors, precious little memory and storage, and tiny
>>> screens. Evry HTC phone I've ever used needed to replaced at least
>>> once (under warranty thankfully) for button or screen faliures (my
>>> AT&T Tilt, my fourth HTC phone, is in the shop now- the camera
>>> stopped autofocusing.)
>>
>> Thanks for that. Never tried one myself, I stick with Nokias.
>
> As did I for about 15 years. I still think they make the best phones.

They can be a bit late with some stuff like touchscreens.

> I like Windows Mobile-based touchscreen phones, though,

Yeah, I much prefer touch screens now having got so used to them with GPSs.

> and Nokia, as owners of the competing Symbian OS, doesn't do WinMo.
> God I wish they did, though!

Yeah, I feel the same way about that. Much more convenient for unusual apps particularly.

And I much prefer everything in the one device too, including a decent camera.

Todd Allcock[_2_]
August 22nd 09, 03:08 AM
"jj" > wrote in message
...
> Todd Allcock wrote:
>> At 22 Aug 2009 09:14:50 +1000 jj wrote:
>>
>>>>> What don't you like about HTC products ?
>>>>
>>>> Despite making phones the size of bricks and twice as heavy, they
>>>> can't seem to squeeze in room for a standard headphone jack. Until
>>>> the release of the iPhone lit a fire under their keister, they used
>>>> slow processors, precious little memory and storage, and tiny
>>>> screens. Evry HTC phone I've ever used needed to replaced at least
>>>> once (under warranty thankfully) for button or screen faliures (my
>>>> AT&T Tilt, my fourth HTC phone, is in the shop now- the camera
>>>> stopped autofocusing.)
>>>
>>> Thanks for that. Never tried one myself, I stick with Nokias.
>>
>> As did I for about 15 years. I still think they make the best phones.
>
> They can be a bit late with some stuff like touchscreens.
>
>> I like Windows Mobile-based touchscreen phones, though,
>
> Yeah, I much prefer touch screens now having got so used to them with
> GPSs.
>
>> and Nokia, as owners of the competing Symbian OS, doesn't do WinMo.
>> God I wish they did, though!
>
> Yeah, I feel the same way about that. Much more convenient for unusual
> apps particularly.
>
> And I much prefer everything in the one device too, including a decent
> camera.

Oh, I forgot to mention HTC always includes lousy cameras too! ;)

I'm actually looking forward to the possibility that the Nokia N900/RX51 is
coming to T-Mobile USA- it's the latest incarnation of the Nokia N-series
tablets running Linux. I might be tempted away from WinMo for a Nokia built
Linux-based touchscreen phone. (With the current decent quality Nokia 5MP
Carl Zeiss lens-equipped camera to boot!)

tlvp
August 22nd 09, 04:33 AM
On Fri, 21 Aug 2009 13:18:08 -0400, SMS > wrote:

> Steve Sobol wrote:
>> In article >,
>> says...
>>
>>
>>> Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme (or
>>> lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the part of T-Mo,
>>> for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe, China, or most of
>>
>>
>> Is your phone a multi-band phone, or does it run only on 1900MHz? Most
>> of AT&T is 800 (850) MHz.
>
> It'd have to be a pretty old T-Mobile (or Voicestream) phone to be 1900
> MHz only. Or one of those crippled tri-band phones that are
> 900/1800/1900 that were sold a while back.
>
Actually, Steve, SMS may have nailed it: it's an older tri-band Nokia 6610
that doesn't do 850 MHz. Yet it *was* able to detect the presence of AT&T as
potential roaming partner, offering to let me request to register with them.

A puzzle. Cheers, -- tlvp
--
Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP

tlvp
August 22nd 09, 04:39 AM
On Fri, 21 Aug 2009 13:34:16 -0400, Todd Allcock > wrote:

>
> "tlvp" > wrote...
>
>>>>>> How would that impact things?
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>> That's fairly obvious. You'd be paying big roaming charges in
>>>>> Hannibal.
>>>>>
>>>>> Did Hannibal have Alltel coverage? It should add to the Verizon
>>>>> coverage shortly.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Roaming on PagePlus is $0.59/minute. While high, it beats the
>>>> alternative of no roaming at all, which is the solution most prepaid
>>>> operators choose!
>>>
>>> I wouldn't say "most." Virgin and Boost CDMA doen't allow roaming, Boost
>>> iDEN has nothing to roam onto.
>>>
>>> American Roaming Network, PagePlus, T-Mobile, 7-11 Speak Out, Tracfone,
>>> Net10, Jitterbug, InPulse, AT&T, and Only1 Mobile (may be out of
>>> business) all allow roaming either included or at extra cost.
>>
>> I can't speak for the other carriers, but our T-Mobile handsets,
>> while away in the glorious SouthWest for a couple of weeks recently,
>> several times found themselves in GSM territory served only by
>> Cingular/AT&T_Wireless, and were unable to register as roamers.
>>
>> Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme (or
>> lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the part of T-Mo,
>> for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe, China, or most of
>> the rest of GSM Asia.
>
>
> It's simply a lack of roaming agreements. I was just in Arizona and New
> Mexico last week and did a lot of roaming on Alltel and a New Mexico
> regional carrier called Plateau Wireless. Do your phones support 850MHz? I
> think the Alltel coverage is on 850 (but I could be wrong.)

Nope, no 850 on my Nokia 6610. But if AT&T was only available on 850,
how did my Nokia even know that carrier was present, and a potential
roaming candidate, at all? Does AT&T *advertise* its presence on 1900,
but only agree to let me register if I can do so on 850 ?

Cheers, -- tlvp
--
Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP

jj
August 22nd 09, 04:42 AM
Todd Allcock wrote:
> "jj" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Todd Allcock wrote:
>>> At 22 Aug 2009 09:14:50 +1000 jj wrote:
>>>
>>>>>> What don't you like about HTC products ?
>>>>>
>>>>> Despite making phones the size of bricks and twice as heavy, they
>>>>> can't seem to squeeze in room for a standard headphone jack. Until the release of the iPhone lit a fire under
>>>>> their keister,
>>>>> they used slow processors, precious little memory and storage,
>>>>> and tiny screens. Evry HTC phone I've ever used needed to
>>>>> replaced at least once (under warranty thankfully) for button or
>>>>> screen faliures (my AT&T Tilt, my fourth HTC phone, is in the
>>>>> shop now- the camera stopped autofocusing.)
>>>>
>>>> Thanks for that. Never tried one myself, I stick with Nokias.
>>>
>>> As did I for about 15 years. I still think they make the best
>>> phones.
>>
>> They can be a bit late with some stuff like touchscreens.
>>
>>> I like Windows Mobile-based touchscreen phones, though,
>>
>> Yeah, I much prefer touch screens now having got so used to them with
>> GPSs.
>>
>>> and Nokia, as owners of the competing Symbian OS, doesn't do WinMo.
>>> God I wish they did, though!
>>
>> Yeah, I feel the same way about that. Much more convenient for
>> unusual apps particularly.
>>
>> And I much prefer everything in the one device too, including a
>> decent camera.
>
> Oh, I forgot to mention HTC always includes lousy cameras too! ;)
>
> I'm actually looking forward to the possibility that the Nokia
> N900/RX51 is coming to T-Mobile USA- it's the latest incarnation of
> the Nokia N-series tablets running Linux. I might be tempted away
> from WinMo for a Nokia built Linux-based touchscreen phone. (With
> the current decent quality Nokia 5MP Carl Zeiss lens-equipped camera
> to boot!)

Yeah, I'm currently using an N95 8G and use the camera instead of taking
notes when shopping around, and for other stuff like yard sales when
I find something that someone has asked me to look out for and I want
to ask them if its what they want etc. The cameras are all I need for
that sort of routine photo when I am out and about and want to have
with me all the time for stuff like some fool damaging your car etc.

Still prefer WinMo tho, just because there are so many more unusual apps for it.

I'd like complete iPhone compat too. There's a great app for the iphone that allows
you to use the phone as an X10 remote and I wish I could run that on my phone.

SMS
August 22nd 09, 05:15 AM
tlvp wrote:
> On Fri, 21 Aug 2009 13:18:08 -0400, SMS > wrote:

>> It'd have to be a pretty old T-Mobile (or Voicestream) phone to be 1900
>> MHz only. Or one of those crippled tri-band phones that are
>> 900/1800/1900 that were sold a while back.
>>
> Actually, Steve, SMS may have nailed it: it's an older tri-band Nokia 6610
> that doesn't do 850 MHz. Yet it *was* able to detect the presence of AT&T as
> potential roaming partner, offering to let me request to register with them.

Sometimes I'm so smart that it scares me.

Dennis Ferguson
August 22nd 09, 06:14 AM
On 2009-08-22, tlvp > wrote:
> On Fri, 21 Aug 2009 13:34:16 -0400, Todd Allcock > wrote:
>
>>
>> "tlvp" > wrote...
>>
>>> I can't speak for the other carriers, but our T-Mobile handsets,
>>> while away in the glorious SouthWest for a couple of weeks recently,
>>> several times found themselves in GSM territory served only by
>>> Cingular/AT&T_Wireless, and were unable to register as roamers.
>>>
>>> Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme (or
>>> lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the part of T-Mo,
>>> for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe, China, or most of
>>> the rest of GSM Asia.
>>
>>
>> It's simply a lack of roaming agreements. I was just in Arizona and New
>> Mexico last week and did a lot of roaming on Alltel and a New Mexico
>> regional carrier called Plateau Wireless. Do your phones support 850MHz? I
>> think the Alltel coverage is on 850 (but I could be wrong.)
>
> Nope, no 850 on my Nokia 6610. But if AT&T was only available on 850,
> how did my Nokia even know that carrier was present, and a potential
> roaming candidate, at all? Does AT&T *advertise* its presence on 1900,
> but only agree to let me register if I can do so on 850 ?

In many markets AT&T operates on both 850 and 1900 MHz. If you
can register with one you can generally register with the
other. Just because your phone can see a carrier when you
do a network scan doesn't mean you can register with that
carrier for service, though, and my experience has been that
T-Mobile (almost) never allows roaming on AT&T.

I say (almost) only because I have a distinct recollection of
roaming on AT&T with a T-Mobile phone somewhere in the US (maybe
middle-of-nowhere Texas?), but mostly when I've tried to force
it to use AT&T it has been refused.

Dennis Ferguson

The Ghost of General Lee
August 22nd 09, 07:51 AM
On Fri, 21 Aug 2009 23:14:25 -0500, Dennis Ferguson
> wrote:

>Just because your phone can see a carrier when you
>do a network scan doesn't mean you can register with that
>carrier for service, though, and my experience has been that
>T-Mobile (almost) never allows roaming on AT&T.

Ditto that. I was in Lafourche Parish, LA a couple of months ago with
friends who have T-Mobile, in an area that's supposed to have good
AT&T coverage. They were constantly using my Alltel phone because
their phones wouldn't work in most places there.

tlvp
August 23rd 09, 01:05 AM
On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 00:14:25 -0400, Dennis Ferguson > wrote:

> On 2009-08-22, tlvp > wrote:
>> On Fri, 21 Aug 2009 13:34:16 -0400, Todd Allcock > wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> "tlvp" > wrote...
>>>
>>>> I can't speak for the other carriers, but our T-Mobile handsets,
>>>> while away in the glorious SouthWest for a couple of weeks recently,
>>>> several times found themselves in GSM territory served only by
>>>> Cingular/AT&T_Wireless, and were unable to register as roamers.
>>>>
>>>> Seems like some sort of alternate-domestic-carrier lockout scheme (or
>>>> lack of appropriate roamming agreements with AT&T) on the part of T-Mo,
>>>> for roaming was never a problem in Canada, Europe, China, or most of
>>>> the rest of GSM Asia.
>>>
>>>
>>> It's simply a lack of roaming agreements. I was just in Arizona and New
>>> Mexico last week and did a lot of roaming on Alltel and a New Mexico
>>> regional carrier called Plateau Wireless. Do your phones support 850MHz? I
>>> think the Alltel coverage is on 850 (but I could be wrong.)
>>
>> Nope, no 850 on my Nokia 6610. But if AT&T was only available on 850,
>> how did my Nokia even know that carrier was present, and a potential
>> roaming candidate, at all? Does AT&T *advertise* its presence on 1900,
>> but only agree to let me register if I can do so on 850 ?
>
> In many markets AT&T operates on both 850 and 1900 MHz. If you
> can register with one you can generally register with the
> other. Just because your phone can see a carrier when you
> do a network scan doesn't mean you can register with that
> carrier for service, though, and my experience has been that
> T-Mobile (almost) never allows roaming on AT&T.
>
> I say (almost) only because I have a distinct recollection of
> roaming on AT&T with a T-Mobile phone somewhere in the US (maybe
> middle-of-nowhere Texas?), but mostly when I've tried to force
> it to use AT&T it has been refused.
>
> Dennis Ferguson

Noted, Dennis; thanks. Matches my impression. Cheers, -- tlvp
--
Avant de repondre, jeter la poubelle, SVP

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