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August 25th 09, 03:36 AM
I'm not sure whether you'd call this "frugal living" or just
"shopping" generally.

In the event that people don't know what a Milk Jug Cover is (also
applies to Sugar Bowl Covers) I'll fill you in. Back in the good old
days when Queen Victoria reigned over an empire on which the sun never
set, Englishmen in the far off colonies (excluding of course those who
hadn't gone "native") used to have tea, usually outside.Milk was kept
in a small milk jug served with the tea service. Unfortunately the
local flies and assorted other insects didn't respect the institution
and had the nasty habit of drinking from/crapping in/dying in the
aforementioned jug. The ever inventive Victorians solved the problem
by designing a porous cloth netting a little bigger than the milk jug
mouth to prevent the insects' entry. One little problem was that the
netting would sometimes blow away so the manufacturer would sew little
glass beads around the periphery of the cover causing it to hang down
and remain in place. Often these were quite decorative and frequently
they were made of lace or at least the edges were.

If you look up "milk jug cover" in google you'll find a large number
of people, particularly in Australia (something to do with excessive
dung there), selling antique covers but no one selling a new one. I'd
like to buy about a half dozen new ones which surprisingly enough I
use for a similar application: covering fruit bowls which attract
little gnats.

Back around 2004 I had one of my English relatives buy two in John
Lewis in Oxford St in London. Unfortunately the wife, who's there now,
had no success. John Lewis's staff said that they haven't had those
(the milk jug covers) in years. Maybe I got their last two. It's the
sort of thing that might be difficult to get on the internet due to
its old-fashioned nature. There's probably some store in downtown
Madras that has dozens in their back room!

Anybody have any suggestions? Oh, I'm not interested in making one
myself, a fact which cuts out 90% of the google entries (the other 10%
are antique ones for sale).

One we get past this, you can turn your attention to the disk that you
put in a saucepan of milk which prevents it from boiling over. I have
two so this isn't urgent. They do work but the physics completely
baffles me.

Rod Speed[_1_]
August 25th 09, 04:57 AM
wrote:
> I'm not sure whether you'd call this "frugal living" or just
> "shopping" generally.
>
> In the event that people don't know what a Milk Jug Cover is (also
> applies to Sugar Bowl Covers) I'll fill you in. Back in the good old
> days when Queen Victoria reigned over an empire on which the sun never
> set, Englishmen in the far off colonies (excluding of course those who
> hadn't gone "native") used to have tea, usually outside.Milk was kept
> in a small milk jug served with the tea service. Unfortunately the
> local flies and assorted other insects didn't respect the institution
> and had the nasty habit of drinking from/crapping in/dying in the
> aforementioned jug. The ever inventive Victorians solved the problem
> by designing a porous cloth netting a little bigger than the milk jug
> mouth to prevent the insects' entry. One little problem was that the
> netting would sometimes blow away so the manufacturer would sew little
> glass beads around the periphery of the cover causing it to hang down
> and remain in place. Often these were quite decorative and frequently
> they were made of lace or at least the edges were.
>
> If you look up "milk jug cover" in google you'll find a large number
> of people, particularly in Australia (something to do with excessive
> dung there), selling antique covers but no one selling a new one. I'd
> like to buy about a half dozen new ones which surprisingly enough I
> use for a similar application: covering fruit bowls which attract
> little gnats.
>
> Back around 2004 I had one of my English relatives buy two in John
> Lewis in Oxford St in London. Unfortunately the wife, who's there now,
> had no success. John Lewis's staff said that they haven't had those
> (the milk jug covers) in years. Maybe I got their last two. It's the
> sort of thing that might be difficult to get on the internet due to
> its old-fashioned nature. There's probably some store in downtown
> Madras that has dozens in their back room!
>
> Anybody have any suggestions? Oh, I'm not interested in making one
> myself, a fact which cuts out 90% of the google entries (the other 10%
> are antique ones for sale).
>
> One we get past this, you can turn your attention to the disk that you
> put in a saucepan of milk which prevents it from boiling over. I have two
> so this isn't urgent. They do work but the physics completely baffles me.

They work by providing a nucleation site so that bubbles bubbles
form easily and you dont see the liquid getting above the boiling
point and then boiling energetically and boiling over.

The same thing is done in chem labs, usually with a few grains of ground china.
That approach has some obvious downsides with milk that will be drunk.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milk_watcher

Rod Speed[_1_]
August 25th 09, 07:11 AM
wrote:
> I'm not sure whether you'd call this "frugal living" or just
> "shopping" generally.
>
> In the event that people don't know what a Milk Jug Cover is (also
> applies to Sugar Bowl Covers) I'll fill you in. Back in the good old
> days when Queen Victoria reigned over an empire on which the sun never
> set, Englishmen in the far off colonies (excluding of course those who
> hadn't gone "native") used to have tea, usually outside.Milk was kept
> in a small milk jug served with the tea service. Unfortunately the
> local flies and assorted other insects didn't respect the institution
> and had the nasty habit of drinking from/crapping in/dying in the
> aforementioned jug. The ever inventive Victorians solved the problem
> by designing a porous cloth netting a little bigger than the milk jug
> mouth to prevent the insects' entry. One little problem was that the
> netting would sometimes blow away so the manufacturer would sew little
> glass beads around the periphery of the cover causing it to hang down
> and remain in place. Often these were quite decorative and frequently
> they were made of lace or at least the edges were.
>
> If you look up "milk jug cover" in google you'll find a large number
> of people, particularly in Australia (something to do with excessive
> dung there), selling antique covers but no one selling a new one. I'd
> like to buy about a half dozen new ones which surprisingly enough I
> use for a similar application: covering fruit bowls which attract
> little gnats.

Why cant you use one of the countless bowls with plastic covers instead ?

Or ramekins with ceramic/glass covers ?

> Back around 2004 I had one of my English relatives buy two in John
> Lewis in Oxford St in London. Unfortunately the wife, who's there now,
> had no success. John Lewis's staff said that they haven't had those
> (the milk jug covers) in years. Maybe I got their last two. It's the
> sort of thing that might be difficult to get on the internet due to
> its old-fashioned nature. There's probably some store in downtown
> Madras that has dozens in their back room!
>
> Anybody have any suggestions? Oh, I'm not interested in making one
> myself, a fact which cuts out 90% of the google entries (the other 10%
> are antique ones for sale).
>
> One we get past this, you can turn your attention to the disk that you
> put in a saucepan of milk which prevents it from boiling over. I have
> two so this isn't urgent. They do work but the physics completely
> baffles me.

The Real Bev[_7_]
August 25th 09, 07:29 AM
Rod Speed wrote:

> wrote:
>>
>> If you look up "milk jug cover" in google you'll find a large number
>> of people, particularly in Australia (something to do with excessive
>> dung there), selling antique covers but no one selling a new one. I'd
>> like to buy about a half dozen new ones which surprisingly enough I
>> use for a similar application: covering fruit bowls which attract
>> little gnats.

You can get little net umbrellas designed for exactly that. Various sizes.
Check the cheesy mail-order catalogs -- Lillian Vernon, etc.

> Why cant you use one of the countless bowls with plastic covers instead ?
>
> Or ramekins with ceramic/glass covers ?

Flexible frisbees. Dog bowls designed for hikers. Baseball caps. The Chinese
hats that used to be called 'coolie hats' but are probably called something
else now. A cardboard box of the appropriate size.

The possibilities are endless.

--
Cheers, Bev
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++
"Giving money and power to government is like giving whiskey
and car keys to teenage boys." -- P.J. O'Rourke

August 26th 09, 03:17 AM
The Real Bev > wrote:

>Rod Speed wrote:

>> wrote:

>>> If you look up "milk jug cover" in google you'll find a large number
>>> of people, particularly in Australia (something to do with excessive
>>> dung there), selling antique covers but no one selling a new one. I'd
>>> like to buy about a half dozen new ones which surprisingly enough I
>>> use for a similar application: covering fruit bowls which attract
>>> little gnats.

>You can get little net umbrellas designed for exactly that. Various sizes.
>Check the cheesy mail-order catalogs -- Lillian Vernon, etc.

Yes but far too "cheesy". The lace embroidered netting with the
multi-colored beads (jewels) is much more elegant.The umbrella type
frequently lets the bugs in at the bottom and they're a problem to
store too.

>> Why cant you use one of the countless bowls with plastic covers instead ?

>> Or ramekins with ceramic/glass covers ?

>Flexible frisbees. Dog bowls designed for hikers. Baseball caps. The Chinese
>hats that used to be called 'coolie hats' but are probably called something
>else now. A cardboard box of the appropriate size.

Aaaagh! You and Rod are missing the point. The netting allows the item
it's covering to breathe. If you enclose fruit in an airtight
container especially if you then have it heating in the sun the fruit
will rot. In the case of milk I imagine the temperature would rise by
a few degrees which in the un-refrigerated environment of the empire
on which the sun never set would be enough to turn it sour. Even in
the refrigerated environment of today I frequently find the
bottled/cartoned/plasticed milk expires before its sell-by date.

Besides it's a great conversation piece. I stumped my in-laws the
first time they visited.

>The possibilities are endless.

It's a pity those possibilities aren't in the nature of places to buy
new ones.

The Real Bev[_7_]
August 26th 09, 03:45 AM
wrote:

> The Real Bev > wrote:
>
>>Rod Speed wrote:
>
>>> wrote:
>
>>>> If you look up "milk jug cover" in google you'll find a large number
>>>> of people, particularly in Australia (something to do with excessive
>>>> dung there), selling antique covers but no one selling a new one. I'd
>>>> like to buy about a half dozen new ones which surprisingly enough I
>>>> use for a similar application: covering fruit bowls which attract
>>>> little gnats.
>
>>You can get little net umbrellas designed for exactly that. Various sizes.
>>Check the cheesy mail-order catalogs -- Lillian Vernon, etc.
>
> Yes but far too "cheesy". The lace embroidered netting with the
> multi-colored beads (jewels) is much more elegant.The umbrella type
> frequently lets the bugs in at the bottom and they're a problem to
> store too.
>
>>> Why cant you use one of the countless bowls with plastic covers instead ?
>
>>> Or ramekins with ceramic/glass covers ?
>
>>Flexible frisbees. Dog bowls designed for hikers. Baseball caps. The Chinese
>>hats that used to be called 'coolie hats' but are probably called something
>>else now. A cardboard box of the appropriate size.
>
> Aaaagh! You and Rod are missing the point. The netting allows the item
> it's covering to breathe. If you enclose fruit in an airtight
> container especially if you then have it heating in the sun the fruit
> will rot. In the case of milk I imagine the temperature would rise by
> a few degrees which in the un-refrigerated environment of the empire
> on which the sun never set would be enough to turn it sour. Even in
> the refrigerated environment of today I frequently find the
> bottled/cartoned/plasticed milk expires before its sell-by date.
>
> Besides it's a great conversation piece. I stumped my in-laws the
> first time they visited.
>
>>The possibilities are endless.
>
> It's a pity those possibilities aren't in the nature of places to buy
> new ones.

If you want one this badly, I don't see why you don't make one or more
yourself. In the time you have used posting about it you could have made
several. Try illusion veiling rather than plain net, it's finer and will keep
smaller bugs out, and round crimp-on lead fishing weights are easier to apply
than beads, and heavier.

--
Cheers, Bev
-----------------------------------------
There's something wrong with my keyboard.
Whenever I type x I get x.

Rod Speed[_1_]
August 26th 09, 05:10 AM
wrote
> The Real Bev > wrote
>> Rod Speed wrote
>>> wrote

>>>> If you look up "milk jug cover" in google you'll find a large
>>>> number of people, particularly in Australia (something to do with
>>>> excessive dung there), selling antique covers but no one selling a
>>>> new one. I'd like to buy about a half dozen new ones which
>>>> surprisingly enough I use for a similar application: covering
>>>> fruit bowls which attract little gnats.

>> You can get little net umbrellas designed for exactly that. Various
>> sizes. Check the cheesy mail-order catalogs -- Lillian Vernon, etc.

> Yes but far too "cheesy". The lace embroidered netting with the
> multi-colored beads (jewels) is much more elegant.The umbrella type
> frequently lets the bugs in at the bottom and they're a problem to
> store too.

>>> Why cant you use one of the countless bowls with plastic covers instead ?

>>> Or ramekins with ceramic/glass covers ?

>> Flexible frisbees. Dog bowls designed for hikers. Baseball caps.
>> The Chinese hats that used to be called 'coolie hats' but are
>> probably called something else now. A cardboard box of the
>> appropriate size.

> Aaaagh! You and Rod are missing the point.

Nope.

> The netting allows the item it's covering to breathe.

Fruit doesnt need to breath, and neither does milk or sugar either.

> If you enclose fruit in an airtight container

I didnt say anything about airtight, and neither did Bev.

> especially if you then have it heating in the sun the fruit will rot.

Like hell it will.

> In the case of milk I imagine the temperature would rise by a few degrees

If you dont like that, you dont put it in the sun, stupid.

> which in the un-refrigerated environment of the empire
> on which the sun never set would be enough to turn it sour.

They had enough of a clue to not put it in the sun.

> Even in the refrigerated environment of today I frequently find the
> bottled/cartoned/plasticed milk expires before its sell-by date.

It will expire even quicker out of the fridge in
a jug with one of the traditional milk jug covers.

And in fact will expire slower in a container with an airtight
lid, just because that stops yeast getting into the milk.

> Besides it's a great conversation piece.
> I stumped my in-laws the first time they visited.

They're completely trivial to make. Just cut it out as big as you want,
hem it, attach the beads or even use clamp on fishing weights as bev said.

>> The possibilities are endless.

> It's a pity those possibilities aren't in the nature of places to buy new ones.

Because hardly anyone sells them anymore now that virtually everyone has fridges now.

And even the english got enough of a clue to have worked out what flyscreens are about eventually too.

Pat and Chris
August 26th 09, 04:13 PM
Top posting. I assume you're looking for these:

http://www.cookmatesouthwest.co.uk/acatalog/Food_Cover___Beaded.html

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Faringdon-Beaded-food-cover-netting/dp/B0012DU0WW

I Googled "net food cover weighted beads". If you do that, you'll find more
sources for these, but I'm not sure you'll find a seller in the States.

Pat McC.


> wrote in message
...
> I'm not sure whether you'd call this "frugal living" or just
> "shopping" generally.
>
> In the event that people don't know what a Milk Jug Cover is (also
> applies to Sugar Bowl Covers) I'll fill you in. Back in the good old
> days when Queen Victoria reigned over an empire on which the sun never
> set, Englishmen in the far off colonies (excluding of course those who
> hadn't gone "native") used to have tea, usually outside.Milk was kept
> in a small milk jug served with the tea service. Unfortunately the
> local flies and assorted other insects didn't respect the institution
> and had the nasty habit of drinking from/crapping in/dying in the
> aforementioned jug. The ever inventive Victorians solved the problem
> by designing a porous cloth netting a little bigger than the milk jug
> mouth to prevent the insects' entry. One little problem was that the
> netting would sometimes blow away so the manufacturer would sew little
> glass beads around the periphery of the cover causing it to hang down
> and remain in place. Often these were quite decorative and frequently
> they were made of lace or at least the edges were.
>
> If you look up "milk jug cover" in google you'll find a large number
> of people, particularly in Australia (something to do with excessive
> dung there), selling antique covers but no one selling a new one. I'd
> like to buy about a half dozen new ones which surprisingly enough I
> use for a similar application: covering fruit bowls which attract
> little gnats.
>
> Back around 2004 I had one of my English relatives buy two in John
> Lewis in Oxford St in London. Unfortunately the wife, who's there now,
> had no success. John Lewis's staff said that they haven't had those
> (the milk jug covers) in years. Maybe I got their last two. It's the
> sort of thing that might be difficult to get on the internet due to
> its old-fashioned nature. There's probably some store in downtown
> Madras that has dozens in their back room!
>
> Anybody have any suggestions? Oh, I'm not interested in making one
> myself, a fact which cuts out 90% of the google entries (the other 10%
> are antique ones for sale).
>
> One we get past this, you can turn your attention to the disk that you
> put in a saucepan of milk which prevents it from boiling over. I have
> two so this isn't urgent. They do work but the physics completely
> baffles me.
>

August 27th 09, 05:17 AM
"Pat and Chris" > wrote:

>Top posting. I assume you're looking for these:

>http://www.cookmatesouthwest.co.uk/acatalog/Food_Cover___Beaded.html

>http://www.amazon.co.uk/Faringdon-Beaded-food-cover-netting/dp/B0012DU0WW

>I Googled "net food cover weighted beads". If you do that, you'll find more
>sources for these, but I'm not sure you'll find a seller in the States.

>Pat McC.

Thank you. That's exactly what I want and buying it in the UK isn't a
problem even if they don't ship overseas.

I don't know whether they do or not but the point is moot because my
resourceful relatives, once pressured, appropriately got their act
together and found two sources: A business called Kitchen Craft (UK)
(the non-UK one is a kitchen cabinet manufacturer) who sells a
"Traditional Lace Bowl Cover" which looks identical to the one in the
URL's supplied above (I now have one in front of me); and a smaller
more ornate one labeled "Beaded Jug Cover" from Norfolk Lavender.
Norfolk Lavender have a website but they don't list it so I presume
it's just something available at their store. Kitchen Craft's website
is under construction.

To the regulars (you know who you are): Consumer Reports, when
reviewing something like shampoo, used to come up with their own
formula and tell the reader how easy it was to make and how much
better and cheaper it was than the store version. Well, I don't do
shampoo, or laundry detergent, or windows, or (in this case) bowl
covers! While you might have no problem procuring and sewing a round
piece of lace fabric and attaching glass beads appropriately, my
skills do not run in that direction. My first questions would be
something like "Where do I get the parts" or "Where do I buy the
sewing machine" and if you think that would be anything like
cost-effective you're nuts. And BTW lead shot or fishing weights
(where would I buy those, no one fishes in Manhattan) look anything
but elegant. Compare with the products in the URL's above. If you
don't want to play by the rules (i.e. respect the OP's original
parameters -- a purchased product) keep off the field.

I had rather hoped that Rod had slightly reformed but obviously not.
In this case, Rod, given that you've nothing better to do, you could
have gone to the local general store in whatever backwater of
Australia you live in and in amongst the hats with the corks hung
around the rim to ward off the flies you probably would have found a
whole assortment of these covers. Or maybe the store owner could have
told you about a particularly well-stocked anachronism out in the ...
well ... outback and you could have announced it to the world (via
this NG) just to show you aren't as backward as we think.

FYI (Rod's):

When you talk in today's context of bowls with covers, the reader is
entitled to presume you're talking about something like Tupperware.
Aitrtightness, at least to the extent necessary is a given. If you
don't believe that fruit will rot especially if heat is applied I
suggest you experiment. Opening it after a few days should convince
you: it did me.

On the question of milk turning sour, this is not due to yeast but
rather to the bacteria not killed during pasteurization. Those
unkilled bugs under the influence of heat and light will eventually
multiply and produce enough lactic acid to sour the milk. Yeast only
comes along later as part of a process of putrefaction. Argue with
Yahoo Answers if you don't believe me.

The gnats that hover over fruit are small enough to pass through
normal window wire mesh. Further both currently and in the Victorian
era people like/d to eat outside especially in summer thus window mesh
is irrelevant. No suggestions about bug zappers please! Then as now
milk and fruit and other foodstuffs were temporarily placed on outdoor
tables sometimes in the sun with no refrigeration and it was and is
important to deny insects access to them.

Just because there's a functional purpose doesn't mean aesthetics are
totally ignored. A portable refrigerator or cooler may well be more
efficient however it lacks elegance. Same with ice buckets.

Rod Speed[_1_]
August 27th 09, 07:08 AM
wrote:
> "Pat and Chris" > wrote:
>
>> Top posting. I assume you're looking for these:
>
>> http://www.cookmatesouthwest.co.uk/acatalog/Food_Cover___Beaded.html
>
>> http://www.amazon.co.uk/Faringdon-Beaded-food-cover-netting/dp/B0012DU0WW
>
>> I Googled "net food cover weighted beads". If you do that, you'll
>> find more sources for these, but I'm not sure you'll find a seller
>> in the States.
>
>> Pat McC.
>
> Thank you. That's exactly what I want and buying it in the UK isn't a
> problem even if they don't ship overseas.
>
> I don't know whether they do or not but the point is moot because my
> resourceful relatives, once pressured, appropriately got their act
> together and found two sources: A business called Kitchen Craft (UK)
> (the non-UK one is a kitchen cabinet manufacturer) who sells a
> "Traditional Lace Bowl Cover" which looks identical to the one in the
> URL's supplied above (I now have one in front of me); and a smaller
> more ornate one labeled "Beaded Jug Cover" from Norfolk Lavender.
> Norfolk Lavender have a website but they don't list it so I presume
> it's just something available at their store. Kitchen Craft's website
> is under construction.
>
> To the regulars (you know who you are): Consumer Reports, when
> reviewing something like shampoo, used to come up with their own
> formula and tell the reader how easy it was to make and how much
> better and cheaper it was than the store version. Well, I don't do
> shampoo, or laundry detergent, or windows, or (in this case) bowl
> covers! While you might have no problem procuring and sewing a round
> piece of lace fabric and attaching glass beads appropriately, my
> skills do not run in that direction. My first questions would be
> something like "Where do I get the parts" or "Where do I buy the
> sewing machine" and if you think that would be anything like
> cost-effective you're nuts. And BTW lead shot or fishing weights
> (where would I buy those, no one fishes in Manhattan) look anything
> but elegant. Compare with the products in the URL's above. If you
> don't want to play by the rules (i.e. respect the OP's original
> parameters -- a purchased product) keep off the field.

> I had rather hoped that Rod had slightly reformed but obviously not.
> In this case, Rod, given that you've nothing better to do, you could
> have gone to the local general store in whatever backwater of
> Australia you live in and in amongst the hats with the corks hung
> around the rim to ward off the flies you probably would have found a
> whole assortment of these covers.

Wrong, as always.

> Or maybe the store owner could have
> told you about a particularly well-stocked anachronism out in the ...
> well ... outback and you could have announced it to the world (via
> this NG) just to show you aren't as backward as we think.

> FYI (Rod's):

> When you talk in today's context of bowls with covers, the reader is
> entitled to presume you're talking about something like Tupperware.
> Aitrtightness, at least to the extent necessary is a given. If you
> don't believe that fruit will rot especially if heat is applied I
> suggest you experiment. Opening it after a few days should convince
> you: it did me.

You aint keeping it out of the fridge in one for days, ****wit.

> On the question of milk turning sour, this is not due to yeast
> but rather to the bacteria not killed during pasteurization.

Wrong, as always.

> Those unkilled bugs under the influence of heat and light will eventually
> multiply and produce enough lactic acid to sour the milk. Yeast only
> comes along later as part of a process of putrefaction.

Wrong, as always.

> Argue with Yahoo Answers if you don't believe me.

It doesnt even say that.

> The gnats that hover over fruit are small enough
> to pass through normal window wire mesh.

Wrong, as always.

> Further both currently and in the Victorian era people like/d
> to eat outside especially in summer thus window mesh is irrelevant.

Wrong, as always. Plenty with a clue use the gauze outside.

> No suggestions about bug zappers please! Then as now
> milk and fruit and other foodstuffs were temporarily placed
> on outdoor tables sometimes in the sun with no refrigeration

Yes.

> and it was and is important to deny insects access to them.

Wrong, as always.

> Just because there's a functional purpose doesn't mean aesthetics
> are totally ignored. A portable refrigerator or cooler may well be
> more efficient however it lacks elegance. Same with ice buckets.

So stupid that it cant grasp that the sort of lids seen with ramekins etc work fine.

Didy Ward
September 16th 13, 12:08 AM
Interesting thread on beaded milk jug covers. I googled this and came upon this site as I am currently making these very items and wanted to find out how widely available they are.

Not very by the look of it!

They do take a long time to do so I won't be making very many...

Not sure where I'll be selling them yet. My local tea shoppe will be taking some and I'll sell some at craft fairs. Maybe in my Folksy shop. I think the way to go might be custom orders.

Didy
(Bonny Lass)

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