A bargain and discount forum. BargainBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » BargainBanter forum » Discount and bargain forums » UK discounts & bargains
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Which solvent to dilute Tippex?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old September 27th 06, 04:11 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,sci.chem,uk.d-i-y
Andy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 77
Default Which solvent to dilute Tippex?

I am in the UK. I think Tippex is not available in the US.

These days correction fluids like Tippex seem to have been reformulated
compared to several years ago.

I think the old chemicals used were too hazardous and the dilution fluid
for them was something hazardous like 1,1,1 trichloroethylene.

----

I have some new style Tippex Rapid and it has started to thicken.
See http://tinyurl.com/qyht6

What household solvent can I use to dilute it?

(1) Isopropyl alcohol doesn't do it.
(2) Acetone didn't seem to work.
(3) I think ethyl acetate (nail polish remover) might have worked
although it was getting hard to tell after 1 and 2. But it smells
hazardous.

What can be used?

--------------

PS: Note that the other Tippex correction fluid is Tippex Aqua.
See http://tinyurl.com/rpwz9
Ads
  #2  
Old September 27th 06, 04:12 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,sci.chem,uk.d-i-y
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 179
Default Which solvent to dilute Tippex?


"Andy" wrote in message
...

What can be used?


Have you tried water?


  #3  
Old September 27th 06, 06:59 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,sci.chem,uk.d-i-y
Staffbull
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Which solvent to dilute Tippex?


Andy wrote:
I am in the UK. I think Tippex is not available in the US.

These days correction fluids like Tippex seem to have been reformulated
compared to several years ago.

I think the old chemicals used were too hazardous and the dilution fluid
for them was something hazardous like 1,1,1 trichloroethylene.

----

I have some new style Tippex Rapid and it has started to thicken.
See http://tinyurl.com/qyht6

What household solvent can I use to dilute it?

(1) Isopropyl alcohol doesn't do it.
(2) Acetone didn't seem to work.
(3) I think ethyl acetate (nail polish remover) might have worked
although it was getting hard to tell after 1 and 2. But it smells
hazardous.

What can be used?

--------------

PS: Note that the other Tippex correction fluid is Tippex Aqua.
See http://tinyurl.com/rpwz9


They banned tippex thinners when I was in school due to the kids
sniffing it !!

  #4  
Old September 27th 06, 07:05 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,sci.chem,uk.d-i-y
Andy Hall
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 51
Default Which solvent to dilute Tippex?

On 2006-09-27 17:59:06 +0100, "Staffbull" said:


Andy wrote:
I am in the UK. I think Tippex is not available in the US.

These days correction fluids like Tippex seem to have been reformulated
compared to several years ago.

I think the old chemicals used were too hazardous and the dilution fluid
for them was something hazardous like 1,1,1 trichloroethylene.

----

I have some new style Tippex Rapid and it has started to thicken.
See http://tinyurl.com/qyht6

What household solvent can I use to dilute it?

(1) Isopropyl alcohol doesn't do it.
(2) Acetone didn't seem to work.
(3) I think ethyl acetate (nail polish remover) might have worked
although it was getting hard to tell after 1 and 2. But it smells
hazardous.

What can be used?

--------------

PS: Note that the other Tippex correction fluid is Tippex Aqua.
See http://tinyurl.com/rpwz9


They banned tippex thinners when I was in school due to the kids
sniffing it !!


IIRC, the correct, and politically incorrect solvent for proper Tippex
(not the girl's school version) is Toluene.

Apparently it clears sinuses as well....


  #5  
Old September 27th 06, 09:17 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,sci.chem,uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Which solvent to dilute Tippex?


"Andy" wrote in message
...
I am in the UK. I think Tippex is not available in the US.

These days correction fluids like Tippex seem to have been reformulated
compared to several years ago.


That sounds similar to "White-Out" in the US, and my comments below assume
the UK version is similar to the US version.


I think the old chemicals used were too hazardous and the dilution fluid
for them was something hazardous like 1,1,1 trichloroethylene.


While that name is chemically impossible, I believe the solvent used to be
either 1,1,1-trichloroethane or 1,1,2-trichloroethylene. In my youth, my
dad worked in an AEP research lab, and he used to bring pints of what he
called "trichlor" or "electrosol" home, but it was never clear to me whether
it was the -ane or the -ene. Both have very similar physical properties and
chemical properties. While both are very weak acute toxins (LD50 is on the
order of 6 g/kg), they have longer-term effects (carcinogen, teratogen and
mutagen). Too bad, because nothing beat the stuff my dad brought home for
cleaning my bicycle chain. I tried methylene chloride in grad school, but
it evaporates too quickly and leaves too much grit behind (not to mention
the burning sensation under my watch band.) Trichlor floated the grit right
away, leaving smooth metal behind for re-greasing.

The new White-Out (now sold in the US as "correction pens" that dispense
white ink) smell to me like they still contain some chlorocarbon (maybe
trichlor)...it may be that nothing but chlorocarbons form stable suspensions
with the TiO2 (or is it ZnO2?). I also think I smell some toluene and some
ketone, perhaps MIBK. The label says "Contains petroleum distillates",
which could be the toluene. When the stuff dries, it smells like linseed
oil, which may be the binder that keeps the TiO2 (or is it ZnO2) from
crumbling away. By smell, it is a real gemisch of solvents.

It may be that no safe solvent works especially well, because more and more,
I'm seeing pen-dispensed correction tape replacing the correction fluid.


I have some new style Tippex Rapid and it has started to thicken.
See http://tinyurl.com/qyht6

What household solvent can I use to dilute it?

(1) Isopropyl alcohol doesn't do it.
(2) Acetone didn't seem to work.
(3) I think ethyl acetate (nail polish remover) might have worked
although it was getting hard to tell after 1 and 2. But it smells
hazardous.


Actually, ethyl acetate is probably the least hazardous of those three you
tried. If it works, I'd go for it. (I used to really like the smell of
ethyl acetate, until one time the airlock went dry on a batch of wine I was
making, and the air exposure converted a detectable amount of the ethanol to
ethyl acetate. It smelled pretty, but boy did it taste awful.

I've used methylene chloride to rejuvenate White-Out in the past. It
resuspends the pigment very well, but it doesn't work great--it evaporates
too quickly. I would try some trichlor (electronics supply shop?) or
methylene chloride (hardware store, as furniture stripper), or maybe toluene
(hardware store--paint thinner or lacquer thinner).

Eric Lucas


  #6  
Old September 27th 06, 09:43 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,sci.chem,uk.d-i-y
Ron Jones
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Which solvent to dilute Tippex?

wrote:
"Andy" wrote in message
...
I am in the UK. I think Tippex is not available in the US.

These days correction fluids like Tippex seem to have been
reformulated compared to several years ago.


That sounds similar to "White-Out" in the US, and my comments below
assume the UK version is similar to the US version.


I think the old chemicals used were too hazardous and the dilution
fluid for them was something hazardous like 1,1,1 trichloroethylene.


While that name is chemically impossible, I believe the solvent used
to be either 1,1,1-trichloroethane or 1,1,2-trichloroethylene. In my


It was 1,1,1-trichloroethane.

I've used methylene chloride to rejuvenate White-Out in the past. It
resuspends the pigment very well, but it doesn't work great--it
evaporates too quickly. I would try some trichlor (electronics
supply shop?) or methylene chloride (hardware store, as furniture
stripper), or maybe toluene (hardware store--paint thinner or lacquer
thinner).


Yes DCM will work. You need a halogenated solvent for Tippex.
DCM also tends to make the plastic bottle a bit "soft" and it dries way too
fast.
I would guess dichlorethane or maybe perchlorethylene would work well


--
Ron Jones
Process Safety & Development Specialist
Don't repeat history, unreported chemical lab/plant near missesa at
http://www.crhf.org.uk Only two things are certain: The universe and
human stupidity; and I'm not certain about the universe. ~ Albert
Einstein


  #7  
Old September 27th 06, 10:41 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,sci.chem,uk.d-i-y
magicman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 26
Default Which solvent to dilute Tippex?


"Staffbull" wrote in message
oups.com...

Andy wrote:
I am in the UK. I think Tippex is not available in the US.

These days correction fluids like Tippex seem to have been reformulated
compared to several years ago.

I think the old chemicals used were too hazardous and the dilution fluid
for them was something hazardous like 1,1,1 trichloroethylene.

----

I have some new style Tippex Rapid and it has started to thicken.
See http://tinyurl.com/qyht6

What household solvent can I use to dilute it?

(1) Isopropyl alcohol doesn't do it.
(2) Acetone didn't seem to work.
(3) I think ethyl acetate (nail polish remover) might have worked
although it was getting hard to tell after 1 and 2. But it smells
hazardous.

What can be used?

--------------

PS: Note that the other Tippex correction fluid is Tippex Aqua.
See http://tinyurl.com/rpwz9


They banned tippex thinners when I was in school due to the kids
sniffing it !!


The good old days


  #8  
Old September 28th 06, 02:29 AM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,sci.chem,uk.d-i-y
Andy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 77
Default Which solvent to dilute Tippex?

On 27 Sep 2006, wrote:


It may be that no safe solvent works especially well, because more
and more, I'm seeing pen-dispensed correction tape replacing the
correction fluid.



I really dislike those things!
  #9  
Old September 28th 06, 04:44 AM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,sci.chem,uk.d-i-y
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Which solvent to dilute Tippex?


"magicman" wrote in message
...

"Staffbull" wrote in message
oups.com...

Andy wrote:
I am in the UK. I think Tippex is not available in the US.

These days correction fluids like Tippex seem to have been reformulated
compared to several years ago.

I think the old chemicals used were too hazardous and the dilution fluid
for them was something hazardous like 1,1,1 trichloroethylene.

----

I have some new style Tippex Rapid and it has started to thicken.
See http://tinyurl.com/qyht6

What household solvent can I use to dilute it?

(1) Isopropyl alcohol doesn't do it.
(2) Acetone didn't seem to work.
(3) I think ethyl acetate (nail polish remover) might have worked
although it was getting hard to tell after 1 and 2. But it smells
hazardous.

What can be used?


They banned tippex thinners when I was in school due to the kids
sniffing it !!


The good old days


Nah, in the good old days, they used mimeograph for school duplication. A
good snootful of chlorinated ink solvent really put one in the mood for
excellent performance on an exam.

Eric Lucas


  #10  
Old September 28th 06, 09:36 AM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,sci.chem,uk.d-i-y
The Natural Philosopher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 24
Default Which solvent to dilute Tippex?

wrote:
"Andy" wrote in message
...
I am in the UK. I think Tippex is not available in the US.

These days correction fluids like Tippex seem to have been reformulated
compared to several years ago.


That sounds similar to "White-Out" in the US, and my comments below assume
the UK version is similar to the US version.


I think the old chemicals used were too hazardous and the dilution fluid
for them was something hazardous like 1,1,1 trichloroethylene.


While that name is chemically impossible, I believe the solvent used to be
either 1,1,1-trichloroethane or 1,1,2-trichloroethylene. In my youth, my
dad worked in an AEP research lab, and he used to bring pints of what he
called "trichlor" or "electrosol" home, but it was never clear to me whether
it was the -ane or the -ene. Both have very similar physical properties and
chemical properties. While both are very weak acute toxins (LD50 is on the
order of 6 g/kg), they have longer-term effects (carcinogen, teratogen and
mutagen). Too bad, because nothing beat the stuff my dad brought home for
cleaning my bicycle chain. I tried methylene chloride in grad school, but
it evaporates too quickly and leaves too much grit behind (not to mention
the burning sensation under my watch band.) Trichlor floated the grit right
away, leaving smooth metal behind for re-greasing.

The new White-Out (now sold in the US as "correction pens" that dispense
white ink) smell to me like they still contain some chlorocarbon (maybe
trichlor)...it may be that nothing but chlorocarbons form stable suspensions
with the TiO2 (or is it ZnO2?). I also think I smell some toluene and some
ketone, perhaps MIBK. The label says "Contains petroleum distillates",
which could be the toluene. When the stuff dries, it smells like linseed
oil, which may be the binder that keeps the TiO2 (or is it ZnO2) from
crumbling away. By smell, it is a real gemisch of solvents.

It may be that no safe solvent works especially well, because more and more,
I'm seeing pen-dispensed correction tape replacing the correction fluid.


I have some new style Tippex Rapid and it has started to thicken.
See
http://tinyurl.com/qyht6

What household solvent can I use to dilute it?

(1) Isopropyl alcohol doesn't do it.
(2) Acetone didn't seem to work.
(3) I think ethyl acetate (nail polish remover) might have worked
although it was getting hard to tell after 1 and 2. But it smells
hazardous.


Actually, ethyl acetate is probably the least hazardous of those three you
tried. If it works, I'd go for it. (I used to really like the smell of
ethyl acetate, until one time the airlock went dry on a batch of wine I was
making, and the air exposure converted a detectable amount of the ethanol to
ethyl acetate. It smelled pretty, but boy did it taste awful.

I've used methylene chloride to rejuvenate White-Out in the past. It
resuspends the pigment very well, but it doesn't work great--it evaporates
too quickly. I would try some trichlor (electronics supply shop?) or
methylene chloride (hardware store, as furniture stripper), or maybe toluene
(hardware store--paint thinner or lacquer thinner).

Eric Lucas


Also try dope thinners from a model shop. Or cellulose thinners from
builders merchants etc.


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bronner's Soap--DILUTE! DILUTE! STILL NOT OK! Paul Ciszek Frugal living 2 July 19th 06 11:20 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 BargainBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.