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white dust from tap water in humidifier



 
 
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  #21  
Old March 23rd 05, 11:23 AM
Serendipity
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ghbt wrote:

"Serendipity" wrote in message
...

ghbt wrote:


Hi, during the winter months the air gets very dry in our house because
of using the central heating.

to make the air more moist we have been using a small humidifier, the
type that you put water in, and it puts a stream of cold mist into the
air.

we have been using tap water in the humidifier and it seems to lay a
white dust on everthing nearby.

presumably that is the chalk in the tap water? (being in london u.k. the
tap water is quite hard [i.e. chalky].

is there a way to stop this dust. many thanks


Assuming this is a portable humidifier and not a built in furnace model,
add vinegar to the water. The vinegar will serve two purposes by ridding
of the white dust and sweetening the air. HTH



thanks for all responses. with filtering, what would i use as a filter
please? it is a portable humidifier. what percentage of vinegar 'to' water
would that be please? many thanks.


I just added a couple of tbsp vinegar to the water.


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  #22  
Old March 23rd 05, 11:32 AM
Serendipity
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PaPaPeng wrote:

On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 20:28:04 GMT, "ghbt"
wrote:


we have been using tap water in the humidifier and it seems to lay a white
dust on everthing nearby.




That's what comes from using an ultrasonic humidifier. Dissolved
minerals, in my water its mainly calcium and magnesium sulphate, is
carried in the fine mist. When that mist water evaporates the mineral
content is deposited around the humidifier.

My solution for humidifying the house is to have a lot of house
plants. If they thrive it means their respiration had kept the air in
the correct humidity. I had disconnected the power humidifier in my
forced air furnace because of lime buildup and because the water in
the water tray was often slimy. That slime is probably mold and had
caused respiratory problems.


We just installed a power humidifier in our forced air furnace this
year. Is there a way to prevent this slime?
  #23  
Old March 23rd 05, 03:28 PM
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Serendipity wrote:

I'm going by experience with the vinegar from few sources. I know it
works to prevent any white film on canning jars when processing them.
If you don't add vinegar, there is a white film on the jars. I've used
vinegar for removing water deposits in my dishwasher. Both these
applications work well but they envolve heat.


Yes. Vinegar does work well for stuff like this.

When we had a table top
humidifier, I used vinegar in the water to prevent water deposits in the
humidifier. This reduced the white dust on the funiture from the
humidifier. I'm not sure why it worked, just that it did shrug


It is possible that the vinegar formed large percipitate particles of
some of the calcium compounds that then sunk to the bottom of the tank
without attaching to it. A lot would depend on the exact chemistry
and contamination of the water.

  #24  
Old March 23rd 05, 06:10 PM
PaPaPeng
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On Wed, 23 Mar 2005 05:32:06 -0500, Serendipity
wrote:


I had disconnected the power humidifier in my
forced air furnace because of lime buildup and because the water in
the water tray was often slimy. That slime is probably mold and had
caused respiratory problems.


We just installed a power humidifier in our forced air furnace this
year. Is there a way to prevent this slime?



Not likely as the furnace draws air from the whole house to
recirculate. The sponge pad and the water tray make an excellent
growth medium. The nutirents were probably from all the dander and
other stuff picked up from the air. The humidifier disperses several
gallons of water a day so there is no effective way of neutralizing
the water tray contents either by adding chemicals. Who wants to
breath chemical vapours anyway. I am handy enough to put in a
home-made UV light source but thought better of it. The house plants
idea is a lot more satisfying. Plants give of as much water as is
required by them to thrive. If they thrive I do. They make the whole
hose look a lot better too.
  #25  
Old March 23rd 05, 08:24 PM
Choreboy
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PaPaPeng wrote:

On Wed, 23 Mar 2005 05:32:06 -0500, Serendipity
wrote:

I had disconnected the power humidifier in my
forced air furnace because of lime buildup and because the water in
the water tray was often slimy. That slime is probably mold and had
caused respiratory problems.


We just installed a power humidifier in our forced air furnace this
year. Is there a way to prevent this slime?


Not likely as the furnace draws air from the whole house to
recirculate. The sponge pad and the water tray make an excellent
growth medium. The nutirents were probably from all the dander and
other stuff picked up from the air. The humidifier disperses several
gallons of water a day so there is no effective way of neutralizing
the water tray contents either by adding chemicals. Who wants to
breath chemical vapours anyway. I am handy enough to put in a
home-made UV light source but thought better of it. The house plants
idea is a lot more satisfying. Plants give of as much water as is
required by them to thrive. If they thrive I do. They make the whole
hose look a lot better too.


It would take a lot of houseplants to use several gallons a day. If you
want to maintain humidity, infiltration may be the first concern. The
second may be a wet-dry thermometer to monitor humidity objectively.

My sister had no way to measure humidity, but for years she ran an
ultrasonic humidifier all winter because she thought it helped her
breathing. I think she finally concluded that the moisture was doing
more harm than good by promoting the growth of allergens.

With no added humidity, my wintertime drop is seven degrees. That's
about 65%, and that's dandy. If I wanted more humidity I'd dry my
laundry on a rack indoors. If I wanted a lot more humidity I'd hang wet
towels on the rack and use a 12" fan. Those fans are quiet and run
hours for a penny.

Years ago I used a fan and towel to clean the air. I'd just put a pan
of beans on high heat to boil when a neighbor came to the door for help.
When I got back, the acrid smoke was too thick to see through. I
ventilated, then for a week hung a wet towel in front of a fan. I
rinsed the towel frequently. It picked up a lot of soot and odor.

So a wet towel can be used to add humidity and remove pollution.

Choreboy
  #26  
Old March 23rd 05, 11:27 PM
PaPaPeng
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On Wed, 23 Mar 2005 14:24:17 -0500, Choreboy
wrote:

With no added humidity, my wintertime drop is seven degrees. That's
about 65%, and that's dandy. If I wanted more humidity I'd dry my
laundry on a rack indoors. If I wanted a lot more humidity I'd hang wet
towels on the rack and use a 12" fan. Those fans are quiet and run
hours for a penny.



I took a look at my weather station - that fancy three dial thingy I
have, more for decoration than utility. The relative humidity reads
42%, and the temp is 70 deg F. That's my confort zone and I have
lived in my house for 23 years. I live in Alberta which is
comfortably dry all year round such that sweat evaporates fast enough
to keep the body dry even when I exercise. Summer temperatures can go
up to 80 deg F and I don't have air conditioning. But that's very
bearable because of the low humidity.

I have enough house plants pots to occupy three office desks. They
are spread out of course. They have adapted well enough that I need
only water them once in five days or once a week. Most of the plants
have been around since I moved in.

The rest of the humidity comes from cooking, from baths and from
laundry although as a single occupant this contribution will be less
than that of a family's. In cool or warm weather I leave the windows
open to let air circulate. I do see pollen collecting on the window
screens and some must get through. But rarely are there any fluffy
airborne seeds getting into the house. The best part is that there is
no condensation on the window glass and I have lots of glass in my
house. There are no moldy spot either.

I hardly if ever catch the flu nowadays, or have respiratory problems
although I have to admit that my place is quite dusty as I hardly ever
vacuum the place. I don't mess up so things look neat normally. A
once a year whole house commercial carpet clean takes care of the
accumulated stuff.
  #27  
Old March 24th 05, 02:15 AM
Serendipity
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PaPaPeng wrote:

On Wed, 23 Mar 2005 14:24:17 -0500, Choreboy
wrote:


With no added humidity, my wintertime drop is seven degrees. That's
about 65%, and that's dandy. If I wanted more humidity I'd dry my
laundry on a rack indoors. If I wanted a lot more humidity I'd hang wet
towels on the rack and use a 12" fan. Those fans are quiet and run
hours for a penny.




I took a look at my weather station - that fancy three dial thingy I
have, more for decoration than utility. The relative humidity reads
42%, and the temp is 70 deg F. That's my confort zone and I have
lived in my house for 23 years. I live in Alberta which is
comfortably dry all year round such that sweat evaporates fast enough
to keep the body dry even when I exercise. Summer temperatures can go
up to 80 deg F and I don't have air conditioning. But that's very
bearable because of the low humidity.

I have enough house plants pots to occupy three office desks. They
are spread out of course. They have adapted well enough that I need
only water them once in five days or once a week. Most of the plants
have been around since I moved in.

The rest of the humidity comes from cooking, from baths and from
laundry although as a single occupant this contribution will be less
than that of a family's. In cool or warm weather I leave the windows
open to let air circulate. I do see pollen collecting on the window
screens and some must get through. But rarely are there any fluffy
airborne seeds getting into the house. The best part is that there is
no condensation on the window glass and I have lots of glass in my
house. There are no moldy spot either.

I hardly if ever catch the flu nowadays, or have respiratory problems
although I have to admit that my place is quite dusty as I hardly ever
vacuum the place. I don't mess up so things look neat normally. A
once a year whole house commercial carpet clean takes care of the
accumulated stuff.

Great solution and I'm glad it works for you. I cannot have most
houseplants because of mold in the soil. Yes, I have medical
documentation of this so it is not my opinion just so the trolls know.
The pollen collecting on the windows would be a huge concern for me
given my extensive allergies. Anyway, this solution would not work for
me. Vacuuming is done here 3 - 4 times or more a week out of necessity.
I simply could not tolerate dusty conditions for personal and health
reasons. The thing is, we each have to customize our home environment
to meet our needs. While your solution works for you, it certainly will
not work for everyone!
  #28  
Old March 24th 05, 05:04 AM
Dr. Rastis Fafoofnik
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"Serendipity" wrote in message
...
PaPaPeng wrote:
me. Vacuuming is done here 3 - 4 times or more a week out of necessity.
I simply could not tolerate dusty conditions for personal and health
reasons. The thing is, we each have to customize our home environment
to meet our needs. While your solution works for you, it certainly will
not work for everyone!


It is so damn hard to keep dust out of a trailer these days!!!!



  #29  
Old March 24th 05, 02:14 PM
Matt
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SJF wrote:

My reference to evaporative humidifiers was to the currently popular type
that draws air through wet filter pads. Guess the electric boilers are
still around but I overlooked them. --- SJF


Get the electric boiler type. Within ten years it will be well known
that the cool mist humidifiers (actually atomizers) contribute to
bronchitis and pneumoniae.
  #30  
Old March 24th 05, 04:14 PM
PaPaPeng
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On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 04:04:10 GMT, "Dr. Rastis Fafoofnik"
wrote:


Vacuuming is done here 3 - 4 times or more a week out of necessity.
I simply could not tolerate dusty conditions for personal and health
reasons. The thing is, we each have to customize our home environment
to meet our needs. While your solution works for you, it certainly will
not work for everyone!


It is so damn hard to keep dust out of a trailer these days!!!!



Make me wonder if there is a equilibrium point somewhere. The air
where I live is quite clean and the inside of the house is no dustier
than the outside. If I vacuum more often it gets just as dusty as the
outside air soon.

One more frugal habit. I do simple and minimal cooking. All food is
contained in one pot. The moment it is boiled it is off the cooktop
and ready to eat. No frying or long cooktimes. Therefore practically
no cooking odors in the house or carpet. No oily film deposit.

 




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