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white dust from tap water in humidifier



 
 
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  #11  
Old March 23rd 05, 01:35 AM
dejablues
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"Dr. Rastis Fafoofnik" wrote in message
...

"Serendipity" wrote in message
...
ghbt wrote:

Hi, during the winter months the air gets very dry in our house because

of
using the central heating.

to make the air more moist we have been using a small humidifier, the

type
that you put water in, and it puts a stream of cold mist into the air.

we have been using tap water in the humidifier and it seems to lay a

white
dust on everthing nearby.

presumably that is the chalk in the tap water? (being in london u.k.
the

tap
water is quite hard [i.e. chalky].

is there a way to stop this dust. many thanks


Assuming this is a portable humidifier and not a built in furnace model,
add vinegar to the water. The vinegar will serve two purposes by
ridding of the white dust and sweetening the air. HTH


As usual dip**** (serendipity) you dont know what your talking about.....
To the original poster, "cold mist" humidifiers work with ultrasonic
energy,
it literally "cracks" the minerals in the water. the use of distilled
water
ONLY will stop the white powder.
"warm" type humidifiers WILL NOT produce the white powder at all.
Distilled
is still preferred as you will get calcium and lime buildup in either
humidifiers.
Serendip**** is giving you BAD info, adding vinegar WILL NOT stop the
dust,
will make the house smell like a salad..., but to trailer
trash.(Serendip****) thats a major plus.



Watch out, Rastis, or you'll get googled and threatened with an incoherent
stream of insults for daring to say that Ms. Dip**** isn't the veritable
fount of All Useful Knowledge. ;-)


Ads
  #12  
Old March 23rd 05, 02:39 AM
SJF
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"ghbt" wrote in message
news
Hi, during the winter months the air gets very dry in our house because of
using the central heating.

to make the air more moist we have been using a small humidifier, the type
that you put water in, and it puts a stream of cold mist into the air.

we have been using tap water in the humidifier and it seems to lay a white
dust on everthing nearby.

presumably that is the chalk in the tap water? (being in london u.k. the

tap
water is quite hard [i.e. chalky].

is there a way to stop this dust. many thanks


The dust is the salt in the water. Nothing you add to the water will remove
salts, including vinegar. There are two possible solutions to the
problem -- use distilled water or replace the humidifier with one that
evaporates the water rather than spraying it into the air. In the long
term, replacing the humidifier with an evaporative unit will probably be
cheaper. Large evaporative units cost about $100, room sized units about
$50 in the U.S. I use a larger unit for my 1200 sq. ft. house. It uses
from 3 to 5 gallons a day here in the desert southwest (mild, but dry,
winters). --- SJF


  #13  
Old March 23rd 05, 03:35 AM
Lou
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"ghbt" wrote in message
news
Hi, during the winter months the air gets very dry in our house because of
using the central heating.

to make the air more moist we have been using a small humidifier, the type
that you put water in, and it puts a stream of cold mist into the air.

we have been using tap water in the humidifier and it seems to lay a white
dust on everthing nearby.

presumably that is the chalk in the tap water? (being in london u.k. the

tap
water is quite hard [i.e. chalky].

is there a way to stop this dust. many thanks

The dust is from the mineral content of the water - it's probably calcium,
but I've never heard it referred to as "chalk" in this context. You can
either use distilled water which would be free of mineral content or switch
to a vaporizer-type humidifier, one which in essence boils the water and
emits steam. With this type, the mineral residue is left behind in the
water reservoir.


  #14  
Old March 23rd 05, 03:37 AM
Lou
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"Lucy" wrote in message
m...

"diddy" wrote in message
...
in thread news whittled the following words:


is there a way to stop this dust. many thanks


Use rainwater or distilled water. Or filtered water.


If you use distilled water, you may need to add a pinch of salt to get it

to
heat up.
lucy


Not if it's a cool mist humidifier - that type uses ultrasonics to break the
water up into drops small enough to float in the air, no heating required.


  #15  
Old March 23rd 05, 03:41 AM
Lou
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"SJF" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"ghbt" wrote in message
news
Hi, during the winter months the air gets very dry in our house because

of
using the central heating.

to make the air more moist we have been using a small humidifier, the

type
that you put water in, and it puts a stream of cold mist into the air.

we have been using tap water in the humidifier and it seems to lay a

white
dust on everthing nearby.

presumably that is the chalk in the tap water? (being in london u.k. the

tap
water is quite hard [i.e. chalky].

is there a way to stop this dust. many thanks


The dust is the salt in the water. Nothing you add to the water will

remove
salts, including vinegar. There are two possible solutions to the
problem -- use distilled water or replace the humidifier with one that
evaporates the water rather than spraying it into the air. In the long
term, replacing the humidifier with an evaporative unit will probably be
cheaper. Large evaporative units cost about $100, room sized units about
$50 in the U.S. I use a larger unit for my 1200 sq. ft. house. It uses
from 3 to 5 gallons a day here in the desert southwest (mild, but dry,
winters). --- SJF


Jeeze, where do you shop? I bought a small room size vaporizer four or five
years ago for less than ten bucks.


  #16  
Old March 23rd 05, 03:57 AM
Rod Speed
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Dr. Rastis Fafoofnik" wrote in message
...

"Serendipity" wrote in message
...
ghbt wrote:

Hi, during the winter months the air gets very dry in our house because

of
using the central heating.

to make the air more moist we have been using a small humidifier, the

type
that you put water in, and it puts a stream of cold mist into the air.

we have been using tap water in the humidifier and it seems to lay a

white
dust on everthing nearby.

presumably that is the chalk in the tap water? (being in london u.k. the

tap
water is quite hard [i.e. chalky].

is there a way to stop this dust. many thanks


Assuming this is a portable humidifier and not a built in furnace model,
add vinegar to the water. The vinegar will serve two purposes by
ridding of the white dust and sweetening the air. HTH


As usual dip**** (serendipity) you dont know what your talking about.....


You're no better on the detail.

To the original poster, "cold mist" humidifiers work with
ultrasonic energy, it literally "cracks" the minerals in the water.


Fraid not, it just creates a mist of the water ultrasonically and that
sees minerals that are in the water end up in the air as well, where
they deposit on surrounding surfaces as the water evaporates.

the use of distilled water ONLY will stop the white powder.


Demineralised water is fine too.

"warm" type humidifiers WILL NOT produce the
white powder at all. Distilled is still preferred as you
will get calcium and lime buildup in either humidifiers.


Demineralised is fine too.

Serendip**** is giving you BAD info, adding vinegar WILL NOT stop the dust,


Correct.

will make the house smell like a salad...,
but to trailer trash.(Serendip****) thats a major plus.



  #17  
Old March 23rd 05, 05:12 AM
dejablues
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"SJF" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
The dust is the salt in the water.


It's called scale, and is caused by any and all minerals in the water.
This site http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5046.html
has some useful ideas.


  #18  
Old March 23rd 05, 05:35 AM
SJF
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Jeeze, where do you shop? I bought a small room size vaporizer four or
five
years ago for less than ten bucks.


Yeh! I remember them now. Had one many years ago and it cost about $10.
Pretty sure you're referring to the boiler type -- gallon jug, two
electrodes and the resistance of the water heats it to generate steam. This
is the one that requires addition of salt if your water is too pure.

My reference to evaporative humidifiers was to the currently popular type
that draws air through wet filter pads. Guess the electric boilers are
still around but I overlooked them. --- SJF


  #19  
Old March 23rd 05, 05:44 AM
PaPaPeng
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 20:28:04 GMT, "ghbt"
wrote:


we have been using tap water in the humidifier and it seems to lay a white
dust on everthing nearby.



That's what comes from using an ultrasonic humidifier. Dissolved
minerals, in my water its mainly calcium and magnesium sulphate, is
carried in the fine mist. When that mist water evaporates the mineral
content is deposited around the humidifier.

My solution for humidifying the house is to have a lot of house
plants. If they thrive it means their respiration had kept the air in
the correct humidity. I had disconnected the power humidifier in my
forced air furnace because of lime buildup and because the water in
the water tray was often slimy. That slime is probably mold and had
caused respiratory problems.
  #20  
Old March 23rd 05, 11:16 AM
Serendipity
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Posts: n/a
Default

wrote:

"ghbt" wrote:


"Serendipity" wrote in message
...

ghbt wrote:


Hi, during the winter months the air gets very dry in our house because
of using the central heating.

to make the air more moist we have been using a small humidifier, the
type that you put water in, and it puts a stream of cold mist into the
air.

we have been using tap water in the humidifier and it seems to lay a
white dust on everthing nearby.

presumably that is the chalk in the tap water? (being in london u.k. the
tap water is quite hard [i.e. chalky].

is there a way to stop this dust. many thanks

Assuming this is a portable humidifier and not a built in furnace model,
add vinegar to the water. The vinegar will serve two purposes by ridding
of the white dust and sweetening the air. HTH


thanks for all responses. with filtering, what would i use as a filter
please? it is a portable humidifier. what percentage of vinegar 'to' water
would that be please? many thanks.


Whoa. There are some errors here.

Your "white powder" is mostly lime (Calcium oxide or CaO) and lime
compounds like calcium carbonate.

A filter will not filter out dissolved lime unless an expensive
reverse osmosis filter is used. Depending on the type, the other
filters filter out suspended particles, use redox to convert some
contaminates into hydroxides, or in the case of carbon filters, absorb
volatiles that have more affinity to the carbon than the water.

Adding vinegar (CH3COOH) to water will not remove the lime. It will
reduce the hardness or "sweeten" it by making more calcium carbonate
(CaCO3) and adding acid, but when the water is all evaporated, the
white residue will still be there.


I'm going by experience with the vinegar from few sources. I know it
works to prevent any white film on canning jars when processing them.
If you don't add vinegar, there is a white film on the jars. I've used
vinegar for removing water deposits in my dishwasher. Both these
applications work well but they envolve heat. When we had a table top
humidifier, I used vinegar in the water to prevent water deposits in the
humidifier. This reduced the white dust on the funiture from the
humidifier. I'm not sure why it worked, just that it did shrug

Adding salt to distilled water in a "cold" humidifier won't help. A
"cold" humidifier sprays the water, often in microscopicly small
droplets created by cavitation from an ultrasonic vibration, whereas a
"vaporizer" used to help people with colds uses electrodes immersed in
water to heat and boil the water. Adding salt there increases the
current flow and heating ability.

A "cold" humidifier can be a breeding ground for germs, which it then
sends into the air. The effect is worsened when the water is not
changed out regularly and the container cleaned. Because of the heat
and method of evaporation, vaporizers avoid this, but can suffer more
lime buildup.

The short answer is to use distilled water, reverse osmosis filtered
water, or rain water in a "cold" or ultrasonic humidifier.

 




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