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VOIP cost effectiveness



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 21st 06, 12:14 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
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Default VOIP cost effectiveness

larry wrote:
Lena, did you do a post on your call-advantage? Point me to
it, but I don't see how it could be cost effective? thanks



Cost effectiveness: POTS with Caller ID, Call Waiting, Voicemail, 8 cpm

Long Distance (Verizon Regional Essentials Plan) $37/mo with taxes and
fees.

AT&T CallVantage (VOIP) with unlimited local calling, 4 cpm LD, CID,
CW, VM, Call Forwarding, "Locate Me", "Do Not Disturb", Call Filtering,

call logs, online retreival of VM (or by phone), speed dial, and many
other features; $27/mo with taxes and fees.


Both Vonage and VoiceWing (Verizon) have VOIP plans with unlimited
local and long distance and many, many calling features for $25/mo,
taxes and fees adding about $7/mo.


I chose CallVantage after reading a lot of reviews on the major VOIPs
(Vonage, VoiceWing, CallVantage). Didn't need LD, and AT&T had a $20
local plan with 4 cpm LD or unlimited LD plan for $30. At the time,
VoiceWing was $35 for unlimited LD, but since then, they dropped the
price to match Vonage at $25/mo.


Voice quality was the major consideration in choosing AT&T, but also
AT&T claims one can use the house wiring after disconnecting the
incoming POTS line, where Verizon insists that only one phone (multiple

handsets are o.k.) be connected to the telephone adapter. Vonage has
the most customers and also the most complaints in the reviews I read.


HTH


Lena

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  #2  
Old May 21st 06, 03:48 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
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Posts: n/a
Default VOIP cost effectiveness


Cost effectiveness: POTS with Caller ID, Call Waiting, Voicemail, 8 cpm

Long Distance (Verizon Regional Essentials Plan) $37/mo with taxes and
fees.

AT&T CallVantage (VOIP) with unlimited local calling, 4 cpm LD, CID,
CW, VM, Call Forwarding, "Locate Me", "Do Not Disturb", Call Filtering,

call logs, online retreival of VM (or by phone), speed dial, and many
other features; $27/mo with taxes and fees.


Both Vonage and VoiceWing (Verizon) have VOIP plans with unlimited
local and long distance and many, many calling features for $25/mo,
taxes and fees adding about $7/mo.


I chose CallVantage after reading a lot of reviews on the major VOIPs
(Vonage, VoiceWing, CallVantage). Didn't need LD, and AT&T had a $20
local plan with 4 cpm LD or unlimited LD plan for $30. At the time,
VoiceWing was $35 for unlimited LD, but since then, they dropped the
price to match Vonage at $25/mo.


Voice quality was the major consideration in choosing AT&T, but also
AT&T claims one can use the house wiring after disconnecting the
incoming POTS line, where Verizon insists that only one phone (multiple

handsets are o.k.) be connected to the telephone adapter. Vonage has
the most customers and also the most complaints in the reviews I read.


You might want to read the recent Wall Street Journal article on
Vonage in which they quote, you might be better off with two tin cans
and a string.

To a businessperson who needs reliable, consistently available phone
service, there is more involved to the costs involved than the monthly
fee.

Vonage is criticized for often having little to non-existent customer
service. Numerous users complain that once they sign up and turn over
their phone number, they are basically "hijacked" and find it
near-impossible to transfer their number anywhere else.

Beachcomber


  #3  
Old May 21st 06, 03:55 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
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Posts: n/a
Default VOIP cost effectiveness

Beachcomber wrote:



You might want to read the recent Wall Street Journal article on
Vonage in which they quote, you might be better off with two tin cans
and a string.

To a businessperson who needs reliable, consistently available phone
service, there is more involved to the costs involved than the monthly
fee.


For sure, Vonage is a cheepo service targeted at home users. Usually
cheap is not frugal.



Vonage is criticized for often having little to non-existent customer
service. Numerous users complain that once they sign up and turn over
their phone number, they are basically "hijacked" and find it
near-impossible to transfer their number anywhere else.

Beachcomber


  #4  
Old May 21st 06, 05:04 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default VOIP cost effectiveness


"Lena" wrote in message
ups.com...
larry wrote:
Lena, did you do a post on your call-advantage? Point me to
it, but I don't see how it could be cost effective? thanks



Cost effectiveness: POTS with Caller ID, Call Waiting, Voicemail, 8 cpm

Long Distance (Verizon Regional Essentials Plan) $37/mo with taxes and
fees.

AT&T CallVantage (VOIP) with unlimited local calling, 4 cpm LD, CID,
CW, VM, Call Forwarding, "Locate Me", "Do Not Disturb", Call Filtering,

call logs, online retreival of VM (or by phone), speed dial, and many
other features; $27/mo with taxes and fees.


Both Vonage and VoiceWing (Verizon) have VOIP plans with unlimited
local and long distance and many, many calling features for $25/mo,
taxes and fees adding about $7/mo.


I chose CallVantage after reading a lot of reviews on the major VOIPs
(Vonage, VoiceWing, CallVantage). Didn't need LD, and AT&T had a $20
local plan with 4 cpm LD or unlimited LD plan for $30. At the time,
VoiceWing was $35 for unlimited LD, but since then, they dropped the
price to match Vonage at $25/mo.


Voice quality was the major consideration in choosing AT&T, but also
AT&T claims one can use the house wiring after disconnecting the
incoming POTS line, where Verizon insists that only one phone (multiple

handsets are o.k.) be connected to the telephone adapter. Vonage has
the most customers and also the most complaints in the reviews I read.


HTH


Lena


What Vonage doesn't tell you is that if you've got an alarm system, you need
a hard-wired phone line (which Vonage does *not* have), and it also doesn't
work most of the time with a home network.

We had it and dumped it because of the above, and they went and totally
hosed my original phone number because they sent through a disconnect notice
to my phone company, a cancellation of the disconnect notice, and then sent
through another disconnect notice that the phone company told me would take
7-10 business days to get cancelled again. If not for a friend calling me
on my cell to say that our home number was disconnected, I never would've
known.

They're crap.


  #5  
Old May 21st 06, 05:34 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
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Posts: n/a
Default VOIP cost effectiveness

George wrote:
Beachcomber wrote:



You might want to read the recent Wall Street Journal article on
Vonage in which they quote, you might be better off with two tin cans
and a string.

To a businessperson who needs reliable, consistently available phone
service, there is more involved to the costs involved than the monthly
fee.


For sure, Vonage is a cheepo service targeted at home users. Usually
cheap is not frugal.



Vonage is criticized for often having little to non-existent customer
service. Numerous users complain that once they sign up and turn over
their phone number, they are basically "hijacked" and find it
near-impossible to transfer their number anywhere else.

Beachcomber


Sine I work in telecom,often at home. the savings are not worth the
diminished quality. Not a very good opening when,on the first call, the
prospective customer has trouble hearing me.

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  #6  
Old May 21st 06, 05:37 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
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Default VOIP cost effectiveness

My IDT service give me unlimited local,toll and long distance along
will caller ID,privacy manager,three way and call waiting for $35 which
comes out to $51 with all the taxes and fees.

--
To reply via e-mail please delete 1 c from paccbell
  #7  
Old May 21st 06, 05:51 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
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Default VOIP cost effectiveness

In article ,
(Beachcomber) wrote:


You might want to read the recent Wall Street Journal article on
Vonage in which they quote, you might be better off with two tin cans
and a string.

To a businessperson who needs reliable, consistently available phone
service, there is more involved to the costs involved than the monthly
fee.

Vonage is criticized for often having little to non-existent customer
service. Numerous users complain that once they sign up and turn over
their phone number, they are basically "hijacked" and find it
near-impossible to transfer their number anywhere else.


I have been a Vonage VoIP user since 11/2004. I know some other people
who have been Vonage customers even longer. I am not a business user
though and my call patterns are very light because I hate talking on the
phone; its a total distraction.

I have the cheapest plan Vonage offers and I am thrilled with it. I am
saving a lot compared to the Verizon residential service I used to use.
The CallerID feature works great and I love the option to send voicemail
messages to me as email. On the two or three occasions when my cable
modem service went out on me, the few incoming phone calls I received
were properly directed to my cell phone.

I have had to use Vonage's customer service two or three times. It was a
bit slow, but the quality of the responses I received was fine.

As I said, I am a light residential phone user. I would definitely have
concerns about using any VoIP service for a business that depends on
telephone service for its income.
  #8  
Old May 21st 06, 05:53 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default VOIP cost effectiveness

In article ,
George wrote:

Beachcomber wrote:



You might want to read the recent Wall Street Journal article on
Vonage in which they quote, you might be better off with two tin cans
and a string.

To a businessperson who needs reliable, consistently available phone
service, there is more involved to the costs involved than the monthly
fee.


For sure, Vonage is a cheepo service targeted at home users. Usually
cheap is not frugal.


In my case, cheap = frugal. I am saving roughly about $20 a month with
Vonage and I have never had a reason to regret switching from Verizon's
residential service to Vonage and I get considerably more service
options than Verizon offers.
  #9  
Old May 21st 06, 07:19 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default VOIP cost effectiveness


Beachcomber wrote:

You might want to read the recent Wall Street Journal article on
Vonage in which they quote, you might be better off with two tin cans
and a string.


If you read my post, you would see that I chose CallVantage over
Vonage, based on reviews including call quality.

If you read some technical reviews rather than just an article in the
Wall Street Journal, or had tried VOIP yourself, you may find that the
service works well in most cases.

My CallVantage is clear as a bell.

It is to easy to be negative about something new, but I challenge you
to try it; you'll like it.

Lena

  #10  
Old May 21st 06, 07:36 PM posted to misc.consumers.frugal-living
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default VOIP cost effectiveness

Shawn Hirn wrote:
In article ,
George wrote:


Beachcomber wrote:



You might want to read the recent Wall Street Journal article on
Vonage in which they quote, you might be better off with two tin cans
and a string.

To a businessperson who needs reliable, consistently available phone
service, there is more involved to the costs involved than the monthly
fee.


For sure, Vonage is a cheepo service targeted at home users. Usually
cheap is not frugal.



In my case, cheap = frugal. I am saving roughly about $20 a month with
Vonage and I have never had a reason to regret switching from Verizon's
residential service to Vonage and I get considerably more service
options than Verizon offers.


But if you were using it for a business it may be another story. Outfits
that have cheap service need to cut a lot of corners as far as
redundancy. Remember when one of those $0.03/minute LD outfits "melted
down" earlier this year and just didn't work? What if you were running a
business and Vonage "melted down" and your business number went dead for
a few days?
 




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